In Like a Lion: Mar 2, 2015 Cambridge City Council meeting

In Like a LionHere's my preliminary list of interesting agenda items. Comments will follow.

Reconsideration #1. Councillor Mazen notified the City Clerk of his intention to file reconsideration of the vote taken on Feb 20, 2015 failing to adopt an order that the City Manager is requested to identify an organization or organizations to study and present options to the City Council regarding possibilities for publicly funded municipal elections that takes into account issues unique to Cambridge. Order failed of adoption 3-4-1-1 and Reconsideration was filed by Councillor Mazen on Feb 23, 2015.

Manager's Agenda #5. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to the City of Cambridge retaining the noteworthy distinction of being one of approximately 34 municipalities in the United States with three AAA ratings from the nation's three major credit rating agencies. [Attachment]

Charter Right #1. That the City Manager is requested to create and fund the position of ombudsman, with degrees of both organizational independence to serve as an advocate and organizational ties to be effective, to serve as a liaison with and an internal advocate for community members. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor McGovern on Order Number Ten of Feb 20, 2015.]

Charter Right #2. That the City Manager is requested to contact the current owners of the Vail Court property and demand that graffiti be removed, exterminators assess the property, and any other maintenance that would improve the appearance and safety of this building be conducted immediately. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Mazen on Order Number Seven of Feb 23, 2015.]

On the Table #12. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Community Development Department to abandon the "Complete Street" plan for Pearl Street. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on Order Number Seven of Jan 5, 2015. Placed on the Table on the motion of Councillor Cheung on Jan 29, 2015.]

Order #4. That the City Manager is requested to confer with local business associations, the Arts Council, and other appropriate city departments to determine the feasibility of hosting a series of "End of Winter" Festivals in our City Squares (Harvard, Central, Inman, Porter, Huron Village, and Kendall) to celebrate our city's resilience and strength.   Vice Mayor Benzan, Councillor McGovern, Councillor Cheung and Councillor Toomey

Order #7. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Information Technology Department to create a space on the city website, where agendas can be made available prior to committee meetings.   Councillor Mazen

Select Stories from the Cambridge Chronicle (the paper of record):

Cambridge Planning Board wants more info on Central Square zoning petition (Sara Feijo, Feb 25, 2015)

First step toward redeveloping Volpe Center (Erin Baldassari, Feb 25, 2015)

Cambridge City Council rejects study of public campaign funding (Monica Jimenez, Feb 25, 2015)
[Note: the actual vote was 3-4-1-1 and one councillor has filed for Reconsideration]

A ‘visionary' leader: Friends, colleagues pay tribute to Cambridge's Brian Murphy (Erin Baldassari, Feb 11, 2015)


Parking Space Saver Removal Operations Begin on March 2
Efforts to Occur on Regularly Scheduled Trash Collection Days

The WorksOn March 2, 2015, the Department of Public Works (DPW) will begin to remove parking “space savers”. This includes any items placed in the roadway to hold an on-street parking spot (ie chairs, toters, barrels, crates). Items will be removed from each neighborhood on its regularly scheduled trash collection day.

“We understand the challenges that residents and businesses have experienced due to the near back-to-back snow storms that have impacted the region, Your patience and cooperation has helped us significantly with our snow removal operations,” said City Manager Richard C. Rossi. “Any major snow storm in an urban setting will cause on-street parking challenges. While we are sensitive to and acknowledge the effort that goes into shoveling out a vehicle that is parked on a public street, City regulations do not allow for space savers.”

Article 18 section 8 of the City of Cambridge Traffic, Parking, and Transportation Regulations states that “No person shall place, erect or cause to be placed or erected within any roadway, any fixture or structure unless or until a permit has been issued by the Traffic Director.” Public Works has not removed space savers during past month because of the demand that record snow clearing operations have placed on personnel and equipment. While snow clearing continues, the current status of operations is such that trash collection trucks are now able to incorporate the removal of space savers in their weekly collection efforts.

For current information on snow operations visit Cambridgema.gov. Updates are also available on Twitter at @CambMA and Facebook at CambridgeMA.Gov. The City is utilizing the hash tag #CambMASnow on Twitter to help the public follow the conversation.


Do You Have What it Takes to be a Cambridge Police Officer?
Register for the 2015 Police Officer Written Exam

Cambridge PoliceDo you or someone you know possess integrity, courage, and a willingness to help those in need? Perhaps you are ready to pursue a career as a police officer!

The City of Cambridge is currently recruiting applicants to take the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Open Competitive Examination for Police Officers scheduled for Saturday, Apr. 25, 2015. An Informational Open House for Cambridge residents will be held Monday, Mar. 9, from 6-7:30 p.m., at the Robert W. Healy Public Safety Building, 125 Sixth St., Cambridge. Check out this informative new video from Cambridge Police Department. For more information, call 617-349-4332, 617-349-3374 or 617-349-4331.

The Open Competitive Examination for Police Officers is held to establish an eligible list from which to fill Police Officer vacancies in civil service cities and towns, and MBTA Transit Police. This eligible list may also be used to fill Police Officer vacancies in non-civil service jurisdictions. The early application deadline for the next Open Competitive Examination for Police Officers is March 13, for a $100 fee and the final deadline is March 26, for a $150 fee. To apply, visit www.mass.gov/civilservice or call 617-878-9895.

More job information is available online at www.CambridgeMA.gov/Jobs or by contacting Personnel@cambridgepolice.org.


Cambridge Works Transitional Jobs Program Graduates 14th Class

Feb 20, 2015 – Cambridge Works, the City’s transitional jobs program for younger residents (age 18-35) who haven’t been able to get or keep jobs, celebrated its 14th graduating class during a special ceremony Feb. 19, at Cambridge City Hall. The program provides a temporary job with the City of Cambridge, and/or other partner employers, while also offering intensive case management, soft skills development and job search assistance to help participants secure an unsubsidized job upon program completion.

Cambridge Works is coordinated through the Office of Workforce Development for the Department of Human Services Program (DHSP).

Mayor David P. Maher congratulated the graduates from the latest class. “We are so proud of you,” Maher said. “We are all so lucky to live in a community that cares deeply about its residents and works hard to get it right. This is a community that is built on neighborhoods and the people that live here. And this program is about government and businesses coming together to effect positive change.”

A former Cambridge Works graduate, Chris Rodriguez, returned to give the recent class some words of advice, encouraging them to never give up and reminding them of the dedicate staff team that will be there for them even after the program has ended, to help them secure employment utilizing the skills they learned.

Comments from the Cambridge Works Class of 2015:
“I’m grateful to them (referring to staff at Cambridge Works) for believing in me and coaching me through tough times.” – Christine Boireau

“The support of the staff and my fellow participants helped me become an enhanced version of myself. The reflection I see in the mirror is of someone who is equipped with the tools needed for success. Thank you.” – Isaiah Jackson

Cambridge Works graduates - Feb 2015
Cambridge Works participants and program staff


Forward FundHOW WILL YOU MOVE CAMBRIDGE FORWARD?

The Cambridge Redevelopment Authority (CRA) announced on Feb 18, 2015 the establishment of the Forward Fund, a new microgrant program intended to support innovative pilot projects by non-profit organizations, community groups, and small businesses throughout Cambridge. They will be awarding Planning & Design grants up to $2,500 and Capital grants up to $10,000 for a wide variety of projects that contribute to the civic and social capital of Cambridge.


Flotsam and Jetsam - Coming up at the Feb 23, 2015 Cambridge City Council meeting

“Flotsam and jetsam are terms that describe two types of marine debris associated with vessels. Flotsam is defined as debris in the water that was not deliberately thrown overboard, often as a result from a shipwreck or accident. Jetsam describes debris that was deliberately thrown overboard by a crew of a ship in distress, most often to lighten the ship's load. The word flotsam derives from the French word floter, to float. Jetsam is a shortened word for jettison.”

Most of the business from the three delayed or cancelled City Council meetings was taken up on Friday, Feb 20 at the first of these twin meetings, but there are a few items left, including all of the Calendar. Before getting to the flotsam and jetsam on Monday's agenda, I would like to say a few words about something extraordinary that took place at the Friday meeting. Specifically, the City Council showed some resolve, and I hope this continues - especially if and when more serious matters are before the Council later this year. We sure could have used this last year when the misguided Carlone Petition was dragged out for months even though only fools believed it ever had the votes of more than 2 or 3 councillors (and it needed as least 6 to be ordained). Of course the Carlone Petition was really all about political organizing and not especially about governance.

Specifically, there was an Order on the Friday agenda contained in a report from a Government Operations Committee meeting that called for developing one or more approaches to publicly financed municipal elections in Cambridge. There are many reasonable people who can make a good case for doing this at the state and/or federal level, but I have not yet heard any convincing rationale for doing this for our municipal PR elections. There has also been more than a passive suggestion that such "clean elections" would be a response to implied corruption among elected city councillors who have accepted donations from major property owners/developers. I have never personally seen any evidence of this. There is also a very low threshold for candidacy in the municipal elections - just 50 valid signatures - and Councillor Kelley has convincingly proven that you don't need a big bankroll to be reelected as long as you can maintain the respect of the people who have voted for you in the past. New candidates often face a challenge in wrestling away #1 votes from incumbents or corralling their own quota of ballots from uncommitted voters to gain election, but the most recent election showed that it's not impossible and it may even be getting easier in this day of social media.

Councillor Kelley asked simply: "What's the problem that this proposal is trying to fix?" That's exactly the point. Normally I would have expected the City Council, out of some misguided notion of courtesy, to kick this can down the road, generate a shelf full of studies, waste lots of staff time and ultimately say, "Never mind." This time, they voted and defeated this pointless initiative on a 2-4-1-2 vote (2 Yes, 4 No, 1 Abstain, 2 Absent). Had there not been two councillors absent, I suspect it would have been a 3-5-1 or a 3-6 vote. [Note: Mazen arrived late and added his YES vote to make this 3-4-1-1.] In any case, I would like to commend Councillors Cheung, Kelley, Toomey and Mayor Maher for their resolve in throwing this overboard. There may yet be discussion about this in Government Operations, but at least the Council will then be deciding whether or not to do something prior to drafting plans for how it is to be done.

Another Order that called for the creation of an "ombudsman" position came close to a similar fate, though ultimately it was made subject to the Charter Right by Councillor McGovern. Anyone who has ever dealt with the Community Development Department or just about any other City Department knows just how helpful and cooperative (to a fault) most City staff are. Councillor Toomey and Vice Mayor Benzan also correctly pointed out that one of the most fundamental roles a city councillor plays is as a go-between when residents feel they need an advocate. I really had hoped the City Council would have just voted this Order down, but the Charter Right is nondebatable and we'll just have to wait until another day (maybe Monday) to see what happens.

Oh, yeah, and on Friday they also talked a lot about snow. That's why they're our representatives. We've all been talking a lot about snow.

As for this Monday's agenda, there are only the 12 Orders pulled (most as a courtesy to Councillor Mazen who did eventually show up over 2 hours late to the meeting) plus the items on the Calendar. The only remaining items of some interest to me are these (and there may be some misnumbering caused by the unusual nature of this double-meeting):

Charter Right #2. That the City Manager is requested to create and fund the position of ombudsman, with degrees of both organizational independence to serve as an advocate and organizational ties to be effective, to serve as a liaison with and an internal advocate for community members.   Councillor Cheung, Councillor Carlone and Councillor Mazen [Charter Right exercised by Councillor McGovern on Order Number Ten of Feb 20, 2015.]

See my comments above or in my notes for the Fri, Feb 20 meeting. I'm not sure if this item can be properly acted upon yet. If the interpretation is that these twin meetings are really formally the same meeting, then we'll have to wait until the March 2 meeting before the City Council can take up the question.

On the Table #11. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Community Development Department to abandon the "Complete Street" plan for Pearl Street. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on Order Number Seven of Jan 5, 2015. Placed on the Table on the motion of Councillor Cheung on Jan 29, 2015.]

Again, see my comments in my notes for the Fri, Feb 20 meeting or in my notes for the Jan 29 meeting. There are much better ways to make Pearl Street better for all users, and the City Council really should send a message that it's not OK to railroad residents based on a biased and nondemocratic process to force an outcome based on the agenda of a select group of individuals, especially when that agenda will compromise resident parking needs and other curbside activities and yield no net safety or environmental benefits. - Robert Winters

Comments?

Catch Up - The City Council will have a Special Meeting on Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 9:00am

City SealIn order to catch up on the multiple meetings cancelled due to snow, the City Council will have a Special Meeting on Fri, Feb 20 at 9:00am. Any business not addressed at that meeting will carry over to the regular meeting on Mon, Feb 23 at 5:30pm. City councillors have been requested to resubmit any new items for the following (Mar 2) meeting. The most notable agenda items (at least to me) are these:

Resolution #15. Resolution on the death of Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager for Community Development.   Councillor Simmons

The people who work at CDD are my neighbors and friends, and Brian was a great friend to me personally and to many other people throughout Cambridge and elsewhere in Massachusetts.

Manager's Agenda #2. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to a requesting that the City Council refile and again refer the Normandy/Twining Zoning Petition to the Planning Board.

Order #28. Refiling of Normandy/Twining Petition to amend the Zoning Ordinances to amend Article 20.000 of the Zoning Ordinances and the zoning map of the City of Cambridge by adding a new section 20.800 entitled Mass and Main Residential Mixed Income Subdistrict within the Central Square Overlay District.   Mayor Maher

This re-filing is necessary because of the snow cancellations that prevented the scheduled Planning Board meeting to occur within the legally required time frame. Meanwhile the Cambridge Residents Alliance, a.k.a. the Peoples' Revolutionary Front to Stop Everything has already drafted its TalkingPoints Memo for its drone activists to recite at meetings explaining why new housing near transit is bad for people.

Manager's Agenda #6. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to amendments and other related documents associated with the proposed Plastic Bag Ordinance.

The proposed amendments are all well-founded and should be given proper consideration by the City Council prior to ordination.

On the Table #10. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Community Development Department to abandon the "Complete Street" plan for Pearl Street. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on Order Number Seven of Jan 5, 2015. Placed on the Table on the motion of Councillor Cheung on Jan 29, 2015.]

I have commented on this previously, so I'll simply say that the City Council should pass this Order. If not, the majority of city councillors who have expressed support for this rebuke will have been played by those who want to use delay in order to solidify their propaganda. Sometimes a rebuke is exactly the right thing to do. There are better plans circulating for Pearl Street that would designate it as a bike/ped priority street without segregating cyclists and compromising resident parking needs and other curbside activities.

Order #4. That the City Manager is requested to work with the Mayor to reach out to representatives and city officials in Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Everett and Somerville to gauge interest in forming an inter-city committee which would meet three times per year to discuss and develop strategies for common issues that would be best handled regionally with support from the state.   Councillor McGovern, Vice Mayor Benzan and Councillor Cheung

Order #9. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments and elected officials from Somerville to arrange a public meeting of the two cities to discuss regionalism and potential regular scheduling.   Councillor Mazen

Again, I have commented previously about the idea of a standing intercommunity committee of local elected officials from Cambridge and its neighbors. It would be a good way to address more regional concerns, especially in the areas of housing and transportation.

Order #10. That the City Manager is requested to create and fund the position of ombudsman, with degrees of both organizational independence to serve as an advocate and organizational ties to be effective, to serve as a liaison with and an internal advocate for community members.   Councillor Cheung, Councillor Carlone and Councillor Mazen

This policy order is an insult to all of the good people who work for the City who have been consistently helpful to residents in practically every way. I sincerely hope the City Council has the wisdom to reject it.

Committee Report #1. A communication was received from Paula Crane, Deputy City Clerk, transmitting a report from Vice Mayor Dennis A. Benzan, Co-Chair of the Economic Development and University Relations Committee and Councillor Nadeem A. Mazen, Chair of the Neighborhood and Long Term Planning, Public Facilities, Arts & Celebration Committee conducted a STEAM Summit on Dec 10, 2014 to present research by the STEAM Working Group and to present the Working Group's recommendations.

Order #25. That the City Manager is requested to determine the feasibility of executing the recommendations of the STEAM Working Group with the appropriate City departments.   Councillor Mazen, Vice Mayor Benzan, Councillor Carlone and Councillor McGovern

I have also commented on this previously. Suffice to say that the intention of these efforts is commendable and I hope that we can capture the interest of young people in every possible way to find a future that takes full advantage of those industries and educational institutions that are all around us in Cambridge. I am not yet convinced that a City Council-inspired plan is the best approach. What is really needed is some re-thinking among all local educational institutions about how to best match Cambridge residents, especially very young Cambridge residents, with the wealth of opportunities all around them. This should be as much about inspiration as facilitation.

Order #29. That the City Manager is requested to work with all relevant City staff to revise the proposed zoning for the Volpe site to include an option for a 7.5 acre public park as originally planned.   Councillor Carlone

We all like parks and open space, but I'm not yet convinced that this proposal is about creating amenities so much as simply blocking new construction, including the construction of new housing. It's definitely worth pointing out that the original 7.5 acre proposal predates the donation of open space that grew out of the Alexandria re-zoning process. No plan should remain static as circumstances change, and until very recently very few people actually believed that the Volpe site might actually become available anytime soon.

Order #32. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the City Solicitor to release a legal opinion regarding the discretion of the Planning Board to deny special permits, even when the special permit criteria have been met, reflecting in particular on the bearing that the case Humble Oil and Refining Company vs. Board of Appeals of Amherst has on discretionary authority of the board.   Councillor Mazen

Give us a break. This effort to politicize the Special Permit process expired with two-thirds of the latest Teague Petition.

Committee Report #6. A communication was received from Donna P. Lopez, City Clerk transmitting a report from Councillor Timothy J. Toomey, Chair of the Government Operations, Rules and Claims Committee for a public hearing held on Jan 20, 2015 to discuss changing the method by which surplus votes are transferred in Municipal elections whether the Fractional Transfer Method could replace the Cincinnati Method and whether this requires a Chapter change and to discuss the Clean Election Law.

This committee meeting only began to scratch the surface of the two topics - (a) practical changes to the Cambridge municipal elections, and (b) the pros and cons of public funding for local elections. I look forward to the continued conversation. - Robert Winters

Comments?

East Cambridge Traffic Pattern Changes Begin Thursday, February 19

The recent winter storm events have narrowed many streets in Cambridge. East Cambridge has been particularly impacted by these conditions, and the City is taking steps to improve public safety during current snow conditions. Starting Thursday, February 19, selected streets in East Cambridge will temporarily change from two-way streets to one-way streets. Crews will begin posting “Do Not Enter” signs throughout the neighborhood on Thursday. We expect these traffic shifts to be in place until April 1. Please refer to the attached map for affected streets. Over the next week, city staff will continue to evaluate streets throughout the city to determine if additional changes are warranted.

We appreciate your continued patience and efforts as we manage historic amounts of snow in our city. For more information on the City’s snow operations, please visit www.cambridgema.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter (@CambridgeDPW, @CambMA, #CambMASnow).

Residents with questions about these traffic changes can contact Public Works at 617-349-4800 or the Traffic Department at 617-349-4700.

East Cambridge One Way Streets


Upcoming Civic Opportunities

Mon, Mar 2

5:30pm   City Council meeting  (Henrietta S. Attles Meeting Room, 459 Broadway)

Tues, Mar 3

4:00pm   The City Council's Ordinance Committee will conduct a public hearing to continue discussions on the zoning petition filed by Whitehead Institute to amend the Zoning Ordinance, Sections 14.32.1 and 14.32.2 to provide for an increment of 60,000 square feet of GFA to be allowed by special permit in a portion of the MXD District, in Section 14.70 by retitling "Special Provisions Applicable Within the Ames Street District" and by adding a new Section 14.72 "Special Provisions Applicable Outside the Ames Street District. (Lombardi Conference Room, 831 Mass. Ave.)

7:00pm   Planning Board meeting  (2nd floor meeting room, City Hall Annex, 344 Broadway)

General Business

1. Update from the Assistant City Manager for the Community Development Department

2. Adoption of the Meeting Transcript(s)

3. Board of Zoning

(1) 10 Canal Park, Special Permit for replacement antenna installation by Sprint

(2) 9 Dinsmore Court, parking in the front yard setback requirement

(3) 209 Broadway, construction of 6 residential units on the former gas station site

Public Hearing

7:00pm   Continued, PB#294, 88 Ames Street, Project Review Special Permit Section 19.20 –Project Review Special Permit for a new development within the existing Cambridge Center block at 88 Ames Street. The proposal is for up to 280 housing units with ground floor retail. Petitioner seeks a modification to the bicycle parking requirements pursuant to Section 6.108, including Sec. 6.104 Location of Bicycle Parking 6.104.1; Sec. 6.105 Design and Layout of Bicycle Parking 6.105.1 (d) and (f); Sec. 6.106 Access Standards for Bicycle Parking 6.106.1 (a) and (b).

Wed, Mar 4

5:30pm   The City Council's Transportation and Public Utilities Committee will conduct a public hearing to consider a presentation from Mothers Out Front and to discuss ways of advancing the goal of net zero emissions by promoting the use of renewable energy and exploring the potential for a utility aggregation program. (Lombardi Conference Room, 831 Mass. Ave.)

Thurs, Mar 12

5:30pm   The City Council's Ordinance Committee will conduct a public hearing to discuss amendments and other related documents associated with the plastic bags ordinance. (Sullivan Chamber)

6:00pm   Kendall Square Urban Renewal Plan Amendment Public Forum (Cambridge Police Department*, Fourth Floor Main Classroom, 125 Sixth Street)

* The Cambridge Police Department requires all participants to sign in and present identification to enter this portion of the building.

The Cambridge Redevelopment Authority (CRA) is hosting a public forum to discuss a proposed amendment to the Kendall Square Urban Renewal Plan (KSURP), following the recommendations of the K2 Planning Study, completed by the City of Cambridge in December 2013. We invite community members to participate in a presentation and discussion of the potential next phase of commercial and housing development within the MXD portion of the Plan Area.

Mon, Mar 16

5:30pm   City Council meeting  (Henrietta S. Attles Meeting Room, 459 Broadway)

Tues, Mar 17

6:00-8:30pm   Interim results of the Cambridge Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment (Kirsch Auditorium, Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, MIT)

The interim results of the Cambridge Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment will be presented and discussed at this public meeting. The meeting will focus on the physical and social vulnerabilities identified by the assessment based on scenarios for inland flooding and increasing temperatures. Preliminary coastal storm surge modeling results for 2030 will also be presented. Coastal storm surge modeling with sea level rise for 2070 is in progress. The vulnerability assessment for storm surge risks will be completed in the spring.

The City would like to hear responses to the interim results and draft findings to inform the vulnerability assessment report, which will provide a basis for the forthcoming Climate Change Preparedness & Resilience Plan, and discuss the community's thoughts about the direction of the plan. The meeting is open to all. Please see the draft agenda here.

For more information on the  Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment, please look to the project page or contact John Bolduc, jbolduc@cambridgema.gov, or 617/349-4628.

Wed, Mar 18

5:30pm   Cambridge Redevelopment Authority Board Meeting  (Cambridge Police Dept., 1st Floor Community Room, 125 Sixth St.)

5:30pm   The City Council's Ordinance Committee will conduct a public hearing to discuss the C2 portion of the K2C2 Study. (Henrietta S. Attles Meeting Room, 459 Broadway)

Thurs, Mar 19

3:00pm   Cambridge Biosafety Committee meeting. (Windsor Community Health Center, 119 Windsor Street, 2nd Floor Conference Room)

5:30pm   The City Council's Housing Committee will conduct a public hearing to provide an update and continue discussion on the incentive zoning study from the Community Development Department. (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 23

5:30pm   Roundtable/Working City Council Meeting on Community Health. No public comment. No votes will be taken. Meeting will not be televised. (Henrietta S. Attles Meeting Room, 459 Broadway)

Wed, Mar 25

4:00pm   The City Council's Transportation and Public Utilities Committee will conduct a public hearing to receive updates and to discuss next steps for the shared-use, rail-with-trail path along the City's Grand Junction corridor. (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 30

5:30pm   City Council meeting  (Henrietta S. Attles Meeting Room, 459 Broadway)


Likely City Council Challengers for 2015 (as of Feb 14, 2015)

Likely School Committee Challengers for 2015 (as of Feb 13, 2015)

Who else are you hearing about?


Hello Recycling & Composting Neighbors! - February 2015

recycling symbol

Love Food? Top Tips to Prevent Wasting It
Be Kind to Collection Crews
Love Recycling? Distribute Recycling Flyers
Love Clementines? Compost the Boxes
Free Document Shredding 3/7

Love Food? Top Tips to Prevent Wasting It

Check out these top 8 tips from Love Food Hate Waste, as well as their “Hints and Tips” resource where you can click on the food you want to rescue. Remember, reducing and reusing are even better than recycling and composting. Thanks for all your efforts to reduce food waste. The Recycling Division’s web page about reducing food waste is another helpful resource.

Be Kind to Collection Crews

Please clear snow to curb so collection crews can access your recycling toters and trash barrels without major obstructions. For more click here. If there is not access we will not be able to empty the containers. Thank you.

Love Recycling? Distribute Recycling Flyers

Please order recycling flyers to distribute at your building. It’s important to distribute recycling flyers periodically as it refreshes residents on what can be recycled and reinforces that it’s a community norm and priority. Thank you for your help! You can also use this link to order refrigerator magnets, laminated signs, toter labels and toters. We look forward to fulfilling your request!

Love Clementines? Compost the Boxes

Once all the plastic has been removed from wooden clementine boxes they can go with food scraps at the food waste drop-off sites around Cambridge. Thanks for removing all plastic first.

Free Document Shredding 3/7

The Cambridge Consumers’ Council and US Postal Service are offering a free document shredding on Saturday, March 7 from 10am-2pm, at the Central Square Post Office, 770 Mass. Ave, snow or shine. Members of the public can securely dispose of personal and confidential paper documents. Documents will be destroyed on the spot in a highly advanced technical mobile shredding truck and sent for recycling. Ten minute drop-off parking will be available on Mass Ave between Sellers & Pleasant Street. Please call the Consumers Council at 617-349-6150 or email consumer@cambridgema.gov.


  • Missed recycling or trash? Please use iReport or call DPW at 617-349-4800 no later than 12 noon the day after collection to make a request.
  • During winter, clear snow to curb so that collection crews can access your trash barrels and recycling toters and they are not behind snow banks. For more click here. Thank you!
  • Request for toters, brochures, stickers or posters? Use our online form.
  • "Like" the Cambridge DPW on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.
  • During holidays weeks, trash, recycling and yard waste collection is delayed one day. Check the 2015 collection schedule online for full details.
  • Furniture in good condition? Schedule a free pick up from inside your home with the Coalition for the Homeless for the for the last Friday and the first Monday of every month, except holidays.. Items must be clean and usable. Someone’s gonna love your stuff.  Email pictures of your good-condition furniture to donations@mahomeless.org and include your address, phone number and put “Cambridge Pickup” in the subject line. They take kitchen tables & chairs, couches & sofa chairs, ottomans, hutches, end tables, coffee tables, bed frames, dressers, bookshelves, cabinets, rugs, lamps, dishes, pots & pans, and blankets & linens. Your donation helps low-income and formerly homeless families furnish their apartments at no cost to them. For more, visit CambridgeMA.Gov/Furniture.

Take the 50% recycling pledge today at www.cambridgema.gov/recycle and get a free sticker!
Recycle More. Trash Less.

February Programs at Fresh Pond Reservation

These events are FREE and open to the public. Children are welcome in the company of an adult.

A Remembrance of Chip Norton, Watershed Manager for the Cambridge Water Department:
http://www.friendsoffreshpond.org/calendar2014/photopages2014cal/jan14/p01-13-14chipnorton.htm
Evergreen Tree Identification Workshop
Dates: Saturday, February 28
Time: 1 to 3pm
Meeting Place: Reservation side of the Parkway crosswalk near Dunkin' Donuts
    Join Ranger Jean Rogers to match samples of evergreens with living specimens on the Reservation and create a map for further study and enjoyment. Inside we’ll use keys and photos to identify them. Learn how these evergreens differ from trees like maples and oaks that shed their leaves before going dormant for the winter. Please register so materials can be prepared and you can be informed of storm plans. Contact Ranger Jean Rogers: jrogers@cambridgema.gov.

Film Screening: The Incredible Journey of the Butterflies!
Date: Monday, March 2
Time: 6 to 7:30pm
Meeting Place: Russell Youth Center, 680 Huron Ave.
    Fresh Pond Monarch Watch will return to the Reservation in 2015! Gear up for the season and learn more about this amazing butterfly with this NOVA documentary that charts the epic migration of the monarch across North America. The film features superb aerial views using helicopter, ultralight, and hot-air balloon cameras along the 2,000 mile journey. This film will be screened at the Russell Youth Center, followed by brief discussion. For more details, and to sign-up for updates in event of stormy weather, contact Kirsten: 617-349-6489, klindquist@cambridgema.gov.

Whole Tree Identification (Resched. from Jan 17)
Date: Saturday, March 7
Time: 1 to 3pm
Meeting Place: Neville Place front door, 650 Concord Ave.
    Come get acquainted with some extraordinary trees that you will find easy to remember because of their unique shapes, bark, and branching patterns. Many of these impressive "specimen trees"* are out on the golf course, and are inaccessible to the public during other seasons. The program will start outside and finish inside with refreshments. Prepare for cold, with hats, gloves, and warm, waterproof footwear for walking off-path, possibly in snow. All levels of experience are welcome! Register with Elizabeth Wylde at friendsoffreshpond@yahoo.com.
*Trees that illustrate the outstanding characteristics of their species.
Growing Up WILD - a nature-education workshop for teachers, caregivers and parents of young children
Date: Saturday, March 14
Time: 9am to 3:30pm
Meeting Place: Maynard Ecology Center, bsmt. of Neville Place, 650 Concord Ave.
    Growing Up WILD is an early childhood education guide that builds on children's sense of wonder and invites them to explore the natural world. Through a wide range of activities, it provides a foundation for developing positive impressions about nature while building social and cognitive skills. Join CWD staff to learn how WILD activities work and ways they can be used at the Reservation. All program participants receive a copy of the guide. Materials fee is $25 to cover the cost of the book. REGISTER by February 26th. Contact Jean for more info and to register: jrogers@cambridgema.gov.
Nature Lives!
Date: Sunday, March 15
Time: 2 to 4:30pm
Meeting Place: Maynard Ecology Center, bsmt. of Neville Place 650 Concord Ave.
    Take a walk with naturalists Larry Millman, Joe Warfel, and Elizabeth Wylde as we explore the Reservation in search of fungi, insects, plants, birds, and anything else that shows signs of life in these lengthening days of early spring. There is a lot happening in, on, and above ground! We may even find some species that are new to our Reservation species lists. Dress for the weather and wear boots for walking off-path. To register and for important parking information, email Elizabeth Wylde at friendsoffreshpond@yahoo.com.
Welcome Spring Bird Walk
Date: Sunday, March 22
Time: 1 to 3pm
Meeting Place: Location given on registration
    Spring is here! The earliest migrating birds are beginning to arrive at the Reservation, where they will either stay for the breeding season, or rest before continuing their journey northward. The new arrivals and year-round residents will soon be busy building nests and defending territories. We may see a variety of migrating waterfowl on the ponds as well as songbirds in trees. Beginners are welcome! We have binoculars to lend and will show you how to use them. To register and for meeting place, email Elizabeth Wylde at friendsoffreshpond@yahoo.com.
Winter Tree Identification by Buds, Bark and Branching Patterns
Date: Saturday, March 28
Time: 1 to 3pm
Meeting Place: Neville Place Parking Lot, 650 Concord Ave.
    REGISTER by March 26! Learn to identify members of the maple, ash, birch, elm, willow and sycamore families - all species threatened by the Asian Longhorned Beetle-by their most distinguishable winter characteristics. With the guidance of Ranger Jean Rogers, keys and photos, we'll discover these species around the Reservation. Bring a field notebook, binoculars and a camera if you have them. Dress to be outside for the first half of the program! Meets at Neville Place parking lot; stormy weather cancels. Please register to be updated in the event of bad weather. Contact: Ranger Jean Rogers at jrogers@cambridgema.gov.

Would you like to join Friends of Fresh Pond Reservation? Membership in Friends of Fresh Pond Reservation costs only $10 per year ($5 for seniors and students, $15 for families). To join, fill out a membership form available in the Ranger Station information racks, e-mail friendsoffreshpond@yahoo.com, call 617-349-6489, or visit our website at www.friendsoffreshpond.org to download a form.

Keep up to date on events at the Pond. Visit the Friends group website at http://friendsoffreshpond.org to learn more about Friends group activities and the reservation and its inhabitants. Upcoming Programs

The Fresh Pond Reservation Stewardship Program
Fresh Pond Reservation users are getting involved! The Cambridge Water Department's Fresh Pond Reservation Stewardship Program brings people together on a regular basis to monitor plants, conduct maintenance activities, and to learn about the ecology and history of the area. You can find out about projects that are being planned for this summer, including invasive plants removal, Purple Loosestrife nursery monitoring, bird box monitoring, and more. Call Kirsten Kindquist at 617-349 6489 or email klindquist@cambridgema.gov for more information.

Read the Friends of Fresh Pond Reservation Annual "Year in Review (2013)"

Grow Native Massachusetts is offering a series of free nature-related "Evenings with Experts" lectures at the Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway. Details are at www.grownativemass.org and grownativemass.org/programs/eveningswithexperts in particular. First Wednesdays of the Month, 7:00-8:30pm.

• Sign up for the City of Cambridge's informative "Recycling and Composting Newsletter" by e-mailing recycle@cambridgema.gov.

AMC Local Walks/Hikes - Come for a walk or hike with us.
AMC Local WalksSat, Feb 28. Blue Hills Skyline Trail, Quincy. 6.5-mile hike, rocky terrain with a number of steep hills with views. Moderate-rated hike, not for beginners. 10:00am-3:00pm, mainly on Skyline Trail, lunch on Nahanton Hill with great view. Bring lunch/water/hiking shoes. Bring traction devices if snow. Email if severe weather. No dogs. Non-AMC members $1. Meet at Shea Ice Rink, Willard St., Quincy. From SE Expressway Exit 8, S 0.6mi. on Willard St. From I-93/Route128 Exit 6 Braintree, N 0.7mi. Storm cancels. L Mike Tuohey. AMC Local WalksSun, Mar 1. Bedford/Burlington/Lexington Woodlands. Very hilly 6-mi. wander through various conservation & municipal lands. 9:45am-2:30pm. Meet at the new Wilson Mill Park, Old Burlington Rd., Bedford, MA. From Rte. 128 exit 32 merge on Rte. 3N for 1.5 mi. to exit 26, turn L on Burlington Rd (Rte. 62) toward Bedford for 0.6 mi., turn sharp L on Old Burlington Rd. Pkg. lot is 0.3 mi. at dead end. Rain cancels. Conditions may require traction devices/snowshoes. L Mark Levine.
AMC Local WalksSat, Mar 7, 2015. Wompatuck State Park, Hingham. 8.5 mile hike w/lunch at scenic pond, 9:30am-2:00pm. Bring lunch/water/hiking shoes. Rte. 3 Exit 14 to Rte. 228N toward Hingham, 4 mi. to Wompatuck sign, then R on Free St. 1.3 mi. to visitor center pkg. lot. Email if severe weather. L Mike Tuohey. AMC Local WalksMar 14, 2015. Blue Hills Hike, Milton. Seven-mile hike in the Houghton section of the Blue Hills Reservation on a variety of trails with several views and lunch on Buck Hill, 10am-3pm. Meet at Houghton's Pond parking lot. From I-93/Route 128 Exit 3, go north to the stop sign at Hillside Street and turn right. Go 0.2 miles to the lot on the right. Joint with Friends of the Blue Hills. L Steve Olanoff.
AMC Local WalksSun, Mar 15, 2015. Skinner Forest and Duck Pond, Groton. 1:00pm. Come for a nice stroll through typical New England woods and along the shore of a beautiful pond. About 2 hours. Meet at the end of Duck Pond Drive, 42.5942N 71.5102W. L Olin Lathrop. AMC Local WalksWed, Mar 18, 2015. AMC Boston - 3rd Wednesday Social in Waban featuring Local Walks/Hikes7:00pm start. The 3rd Wednesday Socials are organized by the Membership Committee of AMC Boston. This one features the Local Walks/Hikes Committee. Union Church of Waban, 14 Collins Rd. (Corner of Beacon St.), Waban, MA. Please RSVP: membership@amcboston.org.
AMC Local WalksSat, Mar 21, 2015. World's End Reservation, Hingham. 5 mile hike/snowshoe, 9:00am-noon. Bring snack/water. From Rte. 3 exit 14, take Rte. 228N 6.5 mi., L on Rte. 3A 1.0mi. to rotary, R on Summer St. 0.5 mi. to light, L on Martin's Lane to entr. $6 fee for non-members of the Trustees of Reservations. Storm cancels. L Beth Mosias. AMC Local WalksSat, Mar 21, 2015. Middlesex Fells, Winchester. Hike/snowshoe; decision made on Thursday. 10am. Wedgmere Station (Lowell Line). Return for 1:30pm train. Bring water and lunch. From Route 3, take Church Street for 0.3 miles and turn right on Bacon Street. Continue 0.4 miles to parking lot on Mystic Valley Parkway. I-93 Exit 33 (Medford) to South Border Road. Head west 2.2 miles, then take Mystic Valley Parkway. Go 0.9 miles and turn right (Bacon Street) under tracks to parking lot on the left. Storm cancels. L Betsy Goeke.
AMC Local WalksSat, Mar 21, 2015. Wright Forest, Walden Woods, and Emerson's Cliff, Concord. Brisk 6-mile hike/snowshoe including ponds, views, some steep trails. 9:30am-1:00pm. Bring lunch/water. From Rte. 2, take 126 North 0.6 mile. Park on R behind Concord Courthouse. Storm cancels. L Marc Hurwitz. AMC Local WalksSun, Mar 22, 2015. Marblehead Light and Castle Rock, Marblehead. Approx 4-mi walk from Deveraux Beach to Castle Rock and Marblehead Light followed by optional hot chocolate break. 12:30-3:30pm. Take Rte. 114 or Rte. 127 to Ocean St. or Beach St. Go E to Devereaux beach pkg lot. Storm/icy roads cancels. L Sara Epstein.

Brian P. Murphy, Esq. of Cambridge, suddenly February 5, 2014. Beloved husband of Katherine (Champion). Loving father of Molly K. and Joseph C. Dear son of the late Joseph G., Esq. and Mary T. (Keaney) Murphy. Visiting hours in the Sullivan Chamber of the Cambridge City Hall, 795 Mass Ave. on Wednesday 3-7pm. Funeral mass in St. Paul's Church Bow & Arrow Sts. Cambridge Thursday at 10:00am. Complete notice to follow. [Obituary & Guestbook]

Funeral Home
Brown & Hickey Funeral Home
36 Trapelo Road
Belmont, MA
Map / Directions
Visitation
Sullivan Chamber of the Cambridge City Hall
795 Mass Ave 
Cambridge, MA
Map / Directions
Wednesday, February 11, 2015; 3:00pm-7:00pm
Service
St. Paul's Church
Bow & Arrow Sts.
Cambridge, MA
Map / Directions
Thursday, February 12, 2015; 10:00am
Cemetery
Cambridge Cemetery
76 Coolidge Ave
Cambridge,  MA  US  02138
Map / Directions
Thursday, February 12, 2015

Feb 5, 2015 - I am stunned upon hearing of the unexpected death of a friend - Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager for Community Development and former Cambridge City Councillor (2002-2009) - an essential person in the civic life of Cambridge. I simply have no words to express my grief. - RW

Brian MurphyMESSAGE FROM THE CITY MANAGER:
It with great sadness that I inform you of the death of Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager for Community Development. Brian was a dedicated husband and father, and a close personal friend to so many of us in this City.

We mourn the sudden loss of our colleague and friend and our thoughts and support go out to Brian’s family at this time.

Employees will be notified of funeral arrangements, once they are determined.

I recognize that we all deal with grief in a very personal way. I encourage you utilize the services available through our Employee Assistance Program. - Richard Rossi

I wrote in February 2011 - just 4 short years ago: "As was noted in a Late Order at the February 7 City Council meeting, former City Councillor Brian Murphy will soon take the reins as Assistant City Manager in charge of the Community Development Department. I met at length with Brian when he first ran for City Council (2001). I suggested that he attend the Budget Hearings to learn more about City government and meet all the players in the City administration. Brian attended every one of those hearings. As a councillor, he then chaired the Finance Committee. He and David Maher were also the prime players among the elected officials in negotiating with Harvard in their major Riverside development a few years ago. You have to respect a guy who actually shows up and does his job, and I'm sure Brian will be a popular hands-on manager at Community Development." - Robert Winters

Brian Murphy (2003)
Brian Murphy in 2003


THE SEGREGATION OF THE STREET - With all the swirling controversy about whether to install segregated bicycle facilities on Pearl Street, this article provides a great perspective on the difference between perceived safety and actual safety.

Marathon, Part 2 - Coming up at the February 2, 2015 Cambridge City Council meeting
This meeting has been cancelled. Agenda items will roll over to the next (Feb 9 Feb 23) meeting.

As expected, the City Council wasn't able to make it through last week's long agenda and many of the items (all of the Orders, in fact) are being carried over to this meeting. In addition to the 27 Policy Orders from last week, there's an additional 10 this week. Several other items from last week are also on the Calendar. I won't repeat my comments from last week for the Old Business and will focus this week primarily on the New Business (after the football game is over).

See below for remarks on Orders #1-27 and other matters from last week.

On the Table #10. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Community Development Department to abandon the "Complete Street" plan for Pearl Street. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on Order Number Seven of Jan 5, 2015. Placed on the Table on the motion of Councillor Cheung on Jan 29, 2015.]

Manager's Agenda #2. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to a requesting that the City Council refile and again refer the Normandy/Twining Zoning Petition to the Planning Board.

Order #28. Refiling of Normandy/Twining Petition to amend the Zoning Ordinances to amend Article 20.000 of the Zoning Ordinances and the zoning map of the City of Cambridge by adding a new section 20.800 entitled Mass and Main Residential Mixed Income Subdistrict within the Central Square Overlay District.   Mayor Maher

Order #29. That the City Manager work with all relevant City Staff to revise the proposed zoning for the Volpe site to include an option for a 7.5 acre public park as originally planned.   Councillor Carlone

Order #30. That the City Manager confer with the appropriate departments and determine the feasibility of renaming the Area IV Youth Center the "Dr. Robert and Janet Moses Youth Center" in honor of these two great community leaders, and report back to the Council.   Vice Mayor Benzan

Order #32. That the City Manager instruct the City Solicitor to release a legal opinion regarding the discretion of the planning board to deny special permits, even when the special permit criteria have been met, reflecting in particular on the bearing that the case Humble Oil and Refining Company vs. Board of Appeals of Amherst has on discretionary authority of the board.   Councillor Mazen

Order #35. That the City Manager report on the rationale behind why there are so many "No Turn on Red" signs in the city at intersections where residents would otherwise feel safe to turn right on red.?   Councillor Cheung

Order #36. That the City Manager confer with the Mayor and various boards and agencies of the City to confers such a working group [of representative members from the City Council, Planning Board, Board of Zoning Appeals, License Commission, and any other boards charged with enacting Council policy].   Councillor Cheung

Early Marathon Monday - Coming up at the January 29, 2015 Cambridge City Council meeting

NOTICE: Due to the expected snowstorm this meeting has been postponed
to Thurs, Jan 29, 5:30pm at the Attles Meeting Room (CRLS)

This should be a rollicking meeting (still up at the high school) with plenty of interesting and controversial items on the agenda. Honestly, there are enough significant items to fill the agendas of several meetings. To provide time for a fair discussion of all of them, this would be a good time to use the Charter Right option to spread some of them over the next several weeks. It may also be wise to refer some of them to the appropriate Council subcommittees for more detailed discussion. Here are some of the items that are especially noteworthy together with some brief comments.

Manager's Agenda #3. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to an appropriation of $10,000 for the Healthy Aging through Healthy Community Design grant from the Massachusetts Association of Councils on Aging to the Community Development Grant Fund Other Ordinary Maintenance account which will allow for the Community Development Department to collaborate with the Council on Aging and the Cambridge Public Health Department to ensure that the bicycle network planning process incorporates measures of and actions for mobility and accessibility for the 55+ population on bicycle infrastructure.

Manager's Agenda #5. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to the status of the reconstruction plan of Pearl Street.

Charter Right #2. That the City Manager is requested to report back on any progress made in acquiring state funding for design and construction of the portion of the Watertown branch B&M Line railroad property to construct the Watertown-Cambridge Greenway and on the feasibility of a low-cost, temporary paving solution for the Greenway in order to realize the community benefits while the path awaits permanent construction. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on Order Number Two of Jan 5, 2015.]

Charter Right #4. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Community Development Department to abandon the "Complete Street" plan for Pearl Street. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on Order Number Seven of Jan 5, 2015.]

BicycleThese are some of the bike-related items on the agenda. Manager's Agenda #3 is a bit mysterious to this 55+ daily cyclist since I've always understood the "bicycle infrastructure" to be the street network. There are, unfortunately, some people in the City administration who are convinced that cyclists need to be segregated into separate facilities rather than share the roads with motor vehicles. This is also the central issue with Manager's Agenda #5 and Charter Right #4 which is a proposed City Council Order to stop the City from removing all parking from one side of Pearl Street in order to segregate those pesky cyclists. My sense is that the Order in Charter Right #2 was only delayed as a response to the Pearl Street plan in order to force a discussion. There is, however, a big difference between making use of an abandoned rail line as a bike/pedestrian path and radically changing the way an existing residential street functions.

Expect some serious self-righteous commentary during Public Comment about how the unenlightened residents of Cambridgeport are standing in the way of progress by not bending over and accepting what is being shoved at them.


Manager's Agenda #6. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to a communication from Director of Environmental Health Sam Lipson relative to proposed amendments to the Tobacco Ordinance along with new red-lined draft amendments addressing the most recent changes requested by the Council at its meeting of Dec 15, 2014 regarding e-cigarettes being banned in workplaces and hookahs being allowed in restaurants. Also attached is the Appendix A list of parks and plazas (Option B) that was previously sent to the Council.

Unfinished Business #15. A communication was received from Donna P. Lopez, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Vice Mayor Dennis A. Benzan and Councillor Dennis J. Carlone, Co-Chairs of the Ordinance Committee, for a public hearing held on Oct 30, 2014 to discuss a proposed amendment to the Municipal Code in Chapter 8.28 entitled "Restrictions on Youth Access and Sale of Tobacco Products and Smoking in Workplaces and Public Places. The question comes on passing to be ordained on or after Jan 5, 2015.

Not much to say on this other than to observe that the last several City Council meetings have brought out a significant number of people passionately opposed to the banning of smoking in public parks.


Manager's Agenda #11. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 14-116, regarding a report on Cambridge Youth Programs usage rates and space.

This report reminds me of similar reports back around 2000 that showed less than full utilization of some of our well-intentioned youth programs and facilities.

Manager's Agenda #15. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to the appointment of Joseph Barr as the Director of the Traffic, Parking & Transportation Department, effective Mar 2, 2015.

Welcome back, Joseph.

Manager's Agenda #21. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 14-103, regarding a report on making the Foundry Building available for a major installation of the 2015 Fab Lab Conference.

Manager's Agenda #24. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to a Disposition Report for the Foundry Building.

The evolving story of "The Gift" continues.

Manager's Agenda #22. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 14-144, regarding the drafting of a framework for a Community Benefits and Mitigation Plan. [Attachment]

Manager's Agenda #23. Transmitting communication from Richard C. Rossi, City Manager, relative to the Incentive Zoning Nexus Study.

Both of these reports have been a long time coming, and the substance of either one of them could dominate an entire City Council meeting. Read the reports and form your own opinions.


Resolution #1. Congratulations to Yoni Appelbaum on being named The Atlantic's politics editor.   Councillor Cheung

Yoni Appelbaum is an incredibly insightful fellow, and The Atlantic chose well in naming him as their politics editor. Perhaps he can exchange notes with Thomas Edsall, a son of Cambridge, who currently writes a weekly New York Times opinion column and who was political editor of the Huffington Post from 2007 to 2009 after working many years as a newspaper journalist.

Resolution #86. Congratulations to Jim Braude on being named the new host of Greater Boston.   Councillor Toomey

Another great choice of our friend and former Cambridge City Councillor Jim Braude.


Order #4. That the City Manager is requested to work with the Mayor to reach out to representatives and city officials in Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Everett and Somerville to gauge interest in forming an inter-city committee which would meet three times per year to discuss and develop strategies for common issues that would be best handled regionally with support from the state.   Councillor McGovern, Vice Mayor Benzan and Councillor Cheung

Order #9. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments and elected officials from Somerville to arrange a public meeting of the two cities to discuss regionalism and potential regular scheduling.   Councillor Mazen

I have spoken with several city councillors during this past year about this very idea and I think it's an idea whose time has come, especially in regard to regional housing and transportation planning and economic issues of mutual interest. Somerville has big plans for Union Square and there's a need to expand housing opportunities in the urban core of Greater Boston. Few would disagree about the need for a more coordinated discussion of regional transportation. Some of our elected officials and their counterparts in neighboring cities and towns would be well-suited for this kind of inter-city committee.


Order #6. That the attached amendment to the Municipal Code entitled "Prohibition on the Use of Polystyrene Based Disposable Food Containers," together with the input of the Recycling Advisory Committee, be referred to the Ordinance Committee for a hearing and report.   Councillor Cheung

On balance this is probably a good thing but, as we saw with the discussion of the proposed plastic bag ban, the alternatives are not always so obviously beneficial from an environmental perspective.

Order #7. That the City Manager is requested to contact the current owners of the Vail Court property and demand that graffiti be removed, exterminators assess the property, and any other maintenance that would improve the appearance and safety of this building be conducted immediately.   Councillor McGovern, Vice Mayor Benzan and Councillor Simmons

The Vail Court saga continues. Perhaps the political contributions of the property owners to local City Council campaigns can be redirected toward rodent extermination and graffiti removal. That might be a good step toward clean elections.

Order #8. That the City Manager is requested to ask all City Departments to have documents and presentations made available to the public and the City Council at least three business days in advance of the scheduled meeting to allow ample time for review.   Councillor McGovern and Councillor Carlone

Why stop there? Each City Council committee should have its own web page where information on all matters before the committee is posted so that it's easy to understand all issues that have been decided, are under consideration, or are planned to be taken up by that committee. Instead of City Council personal aides, there should instead be staff charged with gathering, organizing, and posting this information and facilitating the business of the committee. Each Roundtable meeting should also have a page containing all relevant reference material, but meetings should not be postponed simply because of late submissions of reference materials.

Order #10. That the City Manager is requested to create and fund the position of ombudsman, with degrees of both organizational independence to serve as an advocate and organizational ties to be effective, to serve as a liaison with and an internal advocate for community members.   Councillor Cheung

I'm sure there will be a number of people speaking during Public Comment in favor of this proposal. I respectfully disagree with that point of view. There are plenty of helpful City staff who are always available to assist the public, but advocacy should be left to residents and their various organizations.

Order #12. That the City Manager is requested to take the necessary measures to formally designate the 2nd Floor meeting room at the City Hall Annex, located at 344 Broadway, as the Bayard Rustin Meeting Room.   Councillor Simmons

Bayard Rustin was a great man, but it is perhaps advisable to reserve the naming of public meeting rooms for distinguished Cantabrigians.

Order #15. That the City Manager is requested to work with applicable boards and commissions to assist them in clarifying yearly goals and initiatives, to provide increased administrative oversight and accountability where necessary, and where possible, discuss ways to increase resident involvement.   Councillor Mazen

I'm not quite sure what the real intention of this Order is. Most if not all of the City's boards and commissions already do set annual goals and objectives. Public input is generally very welcome, but it's not always so easy to know the specifics of what is before a given board - even if they have a posted agenda. It is, however, a lot better than it used to be.

Order #16. That the City Manager is requested to report to the City Council any existing agreements that may have been signed between the City of Cambridge and Boston 2024, the US Olympic Committee, or any other organizations representing Olympic interests and that the City Manager is requested to bring any proposed agreement regarding the Olympics to the City Council for discussion and debate prior to signing.   Councillor Cheung, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Carlone and Councillor Kelley

Perhaps I'm misreading this, but it sure seems as though we're setting Cambridge up to be voice of the Loyal Opposition in all matters relating to the 2024 Olympics bid. Boston employees will be under a gag order and all of the criticism will be routed through voices in Cambridge and Somerville.

Order #17. That the City Council go on record in support of the We the People Act.   Councillor Carlone and Councillor Mazen

It's a sure bet that some people will step up to the microphone in support of this Order. The referenced Act centers on a proposed U.S. Constitutional amendment in response to the Citizens United decision of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Order #18. That the City Manager be and hereby is requested not to enter into any future contracts to obtain electricity from TransCanada and to investigate the possibility of entering into an agreement to obtain up to 100% renewable power for all municipal electricity needs.   Councillor Carlone

Buy the cheapest electricity regardless of the source. Focus your advocacy on making alternate energy sources more economically competitive rather than just making economically poor choices based on political criteria.

Order #19. That the City Manager is requested to work with all relevant City Staff to explore the potential for installing composting facilities inside City Hall and other key municipal buildings.   Councillor Carlone

Perhaps the intention of this Order is to facilitate organics collection at City Hall and other municipal buildings. That's NOT the same thing as installing composting facilities in these buildings which will likely be problematic and ill-advised.


Order #23. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Cambridge Redevelopment Authority to determine if they can be of further assistance in understanding how the portion of the [Grand Junction Multiuse] path from Binney to the Somerville border can be completed and to report back to the City Council.   Councillor Toomey

Order #24. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Assistant City Manager of Community Development and report back to the City Council with language that could create a Grand Junction Overlay District that would help to create incentives and ensure the completion of the Grand Junction Multiuse Path.   Councillor Toomey

Anything that helps to facilitate the improvement of this corridor to support a multi-use path is worth it - as long as future rail passenger service can still be accommodated. This corridor has great potential for linking Cambridge and MIT with new and existing housing in Somerville and Allston and beyond.


Order #25. That the City Manager is requested to determine the feasibility of executing the recommendations of the STEAM Working Group with the appropriate City departments.   Councillor Mazen, Vice Mayor Benzan, Councillor Carlone and Councillor McGovern

Committee Report #1. A communication was received from Paula Crane, Deputy City Clerk, transmitting a report from Vice Mayor Dennis A. Benzan, Co-Chair of the Economic Development and University Relations Committee and Councillor Nadeem A. Mazen, Chair of the Neighborhood and Long Term Planning, Public Facilities, Arts & Celebration Committee conducted a STEAM Summit on Dec 10, 2014 to present research by the STEAM Working Group and to present the Working Group's recommendations.

I can't speak to the specifics and I'm still skeptical of the focus on creating new agencies and new staff positions to support this, but I do agree with the underlying goals. I would much prefer realigning existing staff in the schools and elsewhere to achieve the goal of matching local residents, especially those who have been traditionally disadvantaged, with job opportunities in fields requiring science, mathematics, and engineering skills.


Order #26. That the City Manager is requested to determine the feasibility of creating a survey in collaboration with the Community Development Department and other appropriate departments to gather data on the positive impact of the Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance on the lives of Cambridge residents and families and to determine the feasibility of hosting a town hall meeting where tenants and families who benefit from the Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance can come together to share their experiences and provide valuable feedback on how to perfect the program.   Vice Mayor Benzan, Councillor McGovern and Councillor Cheung

Together with the Incentive Zoning Nexus Study and possible revisions to the Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance, we may see a lot of activity this year on the various tools for producing housing and other benefits from the money generated by new development.

Order #27. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to determine the feasibility of renaming Area 4 "The Port."   Vice Mayor Benzan

There's really no need for a feasibility study for a change like this. Just do it and have future documents reflect the change. It will be a little confusing having one neighborhood called Cambridgeport and another called The Port. Perhaps we should again refer to them as The Upper Port and The Lower Port. There's also the annoying little detail that there hasn't actually been a port in either neighborhood for ages. Perhaps we should also change the name of a part of North Cambridge to The Brickyards in honor of another discontinued use. - Robert Winters

Comments?

Perhaps it's time to rein in the Cambridge Bicycle Committee

The Cambridge Bicycle Committee (or, to be more precise, current and former members and others who share their mindset) has a Facebook page [Cambridge Bikes!]. It's been interesting hearing what some of the members are saying in response to Councillor Toomey's proposed Order questioning the removal of parking on one side of Pearl Street from Central Square to the Charles River in order to segregate cyclists. Here are some gems:

Tom Meek - The message is the city wants to get more people on bikes.... Don't like it make a pretty $$$ on your house and move elsewhere where you can buy a pad with a big driveway for 1/2 as much lol

Matt Carphree - Street parking in Cambridge costs the user less than 7 cents a day. A nickel, and two pennies to rent 200 square feet of prime real estate in one of the thirty most population dense cities in the USA. Hellas yeah if I was on that crack, I'd fight anyone threatening to take it away!

Matt Carphree (Parking scarcity is never a supply problem. It's a pricing problem)

Douglas M. Kline - In addition to the points already made (to amplify one, an annual resident parking sticker should cost at least $1,000 and as much as $2,000 in some neighborhoods and that would put a dent in the demand for on-street parking), no one promised that on-street parking would always be available and life is full of risk. Car owners have a lot of nerve assuming that they will always have what they should never have been given in the first place. Also the distinction between adding cars and taking away spots is hardly more than semantic unless you intend to take away a spot for each car that is sold or whose owner moves away and doesn't expect to regularly use the space any more such that spots for cars currently owned by current residents are grandfathered in and others are eliminated and all on-street parking will eventually be eliminated.

The more I hear from these people of the Cambridge Bicycle Committee the more I am convinced that they're out of control and that Councillor Toomey's Order is both timely and appropriate. Rarely have I seen this level of self-righteous hostility in Cambridge - and I'm a year-round daily cyclist. - Robert Winters

PS - Here's a sterling example of a graphic that violates every principle of statistical survey design:

How to skew a survey result

The image on the left suggests a cyclist about to be run over by a bus. That's the image used to illustrate the Pearl Street design option the Bicycle Committee and its staff does not want you to choose. It's in the online survey instrument they circulated among people they hope will vote the way they want. The inclusion of this graphic renders the survey invalid. That's Statistics 101.


Age Distribution of Voters in Cambridge Elections: 2007-2014

  Nov 2007
municipal
Nov 2008
federal
Nov 2009
municipal
Nov 2010
state
Nov 2011
municipal
Nov 2012
federal
Nov 2013
municipal
Nov 2014
state
Cambridge voters 13703 43482 16001 33840 15907 49835 17800 32569
Median Age 55.9 41.3 55.2 47.4 56.5 40.1 56.4 49.3
Average Age 55.6 44.8 56.1 48.4 55.3 44.5 54.6 49.8
November 2014 November 2013
November 2012 November 2011
November 2010 November 2009
November 2008 November 2007

Note: Data used for this analysis comes from the Cambridge registered voter database and voter history files for the respective years. Voters without specified birthdates have been excluded (very small number). In addition, a small number of public safety officials are also not included in the publicly available registered database.

Comments?


We're taking some time off from Cambridge InsideOut. We hope to be back on the air in February or March 2015.

Recent Broadcasts of Cambridge InsideOut    [complete list of shows]

Aug 19 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 79 and 80 with Terry Smith

Cambridge InsideOutAug 5 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 77 and 78 with Patty Nolan

July 29 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 75 and 76 with Brian Corr

July 22 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 73 and 74 with Marc McGovern

July 15 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 71 and 72: News and Events, July 2014

July 1 - Transportation Safety w/guest Rozann Kraus

June 24 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 67-68: More News Around Town

June 17 - Tales from the Democratic Convention and other news from around town

June 10 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 63 and 64 with Glenn Koocher
We had a great time doing these shows with the man who invented the original Cambridge InsideOut - Glenn Koocher.

June 3 - Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 61 and 62 – News and Commentary

Watch Cambridge InsideOut on CCTV every Tuesday at 5:30pm and 6:00pm. The co-hosts are Susana Segat and Robert Winters.

MBTA Role in Jump-starting Development of the Cambridge Center Project Kendall Station Urban Initiatives Project, 1979-1989
By Thad Tercyak, Cambridge Redevelopment Authority, Associate Director, 1968-1990

MAPC Study: 435,000 new housing units needed by 2040

A new report is estimating that the greater Boston area will need another 435,000 new housing units by 2040 to lure new workers and accommodate an aging population. [Reports available here]

Note: When comparing the peak population of Cambridge back in the 1950s (over 120,000) to what it is today (perhaps 107,000) it's important to keep in mind that families were typically much larger then. It's also the case that what people find acceptable in terms of living space and amenities has changed dramatically over six decades. This translates into considerably more "units" of housing (and higher density) in Cambridge if the population should rise to levels close to what they were in days of yore.


K2C2 Final Reports Released

K2C2 areaThe final reports for Kendall Square and Central Square are now available for download. Zoning discussions based on the recommendations of the K2 and C2 Advisory Committees, which are encapsulated in these reports, will continue in 2014.

Community Development Department

Kendall Square Central Square Planning Study (K2C2)

Central Square Final Report 2013 Part 1, December 2013

Central Square Final Report 2013 Part 2, December 2013

Kendall Square Final Report 2013 Part 1, December 2013

Kendall Square Final Report 2013 Part 2, December 2013

This comprehensive planning effort guided by stakeholder advisory committees, City staff, and a team of multidisciplinary consultants led by Goody Clancy, developed a vision and master plan for Central Square, Kendall Square, and the area South of Main Street (including the Osborn Triangle) connecting the two squares. Both final reports are divided into two parts; in each case you will need to review both parts to read the entire report.

Comments?


Open for Comments - CCJ Forum

Catching Up on the Cambridge News (Feb 27, 2015)

Flotsam and Jetsam – Coming up at the Feb 23, 2015 Cambridge City Council meeting (Feb 22, 2015)

Plowing, or sweeping under the rug? (Feb 21, 2015 by John Allen)

Catch Up – The City Council will have a Special Meeting on Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 9:00am (Feb 20, 2015)

Brian Murphy, 1964-2015 (Feb 5, 2015)

Early Marathon Monday – Coming up at the January 26, 2015 Cambridge City Council meeting (Jan 26, 2015)

Catching Up on the Cambridge News (Jan 2015) - posted Jan 18, 2015

Campaign Finance – 2015 Cambridge City Council Candidates (Jan 15, 2015 and updated periodically)

Campaign Finance – 2013 Cambridge City Council candidates (May 25, 2013, updated Jan 14, 2015)

Cambridge Public Library Receives National Honor Award in Architecture (Jan 9, 2015)

Looking ahead – January 5, 2015 Cambridge City Council meeting (Jan 4, 2015)

Age Distribution of Voters in Cambridge Elections: 2007-2014 (Jan 4, 2015)

Current City of Cambridge Board and Commission Vacancies (updated Nov 21, 2014)

Cambridge InsideOut Episodes 63 and 64 with Glenn Koocher (June 10, 2014)

Master Plan Mythology and other Big Items on the Apr 7, 2014 City Council Agenda (Apr 7, 2014)

MBTA Role in Cambridge Center Project – Kendall Station Urban Initiatives Project, 1979-1989 (Feb 13, 2014)

Cambridge School Committee 2013 Campaign Finance Summaries (Nov 3, 2013, updated Feb 8, 2014)

K2C2 Final Reports Released (Dec 31, 2013)

The Advent of PR in Cambridge (Nov 10, 2013)

Completing the Square (June 11, 2013)

Kendall Square Urban Renewal Project: Six Pivotal Episodes (June 8, 2013)

April 1 Cambridge News (Apr 1, 2013) - the April Fool's Day edition

On becoming a True Cantabrigian (Dec 29, 2012)

Kendall Square Urban Renewal Project, Initial Years, 1963 to 1982 (July 12, 2012)

Kendall Square Urban Renewal Area – Cambridge Redevelopment Authority (Apr 5, 2012)

“Cycle track”: a sidewalk by another name (posted Aug 11, 2010, letter of Paul Schimek)

The Advent of PR in Cambridge
originally published in the Cambridge Civic Journal on Feb 12, 1998


April 2, 2013 - Well, that was fun. Thanks to everyone for being such a sport on April Fool's Day.

Central Square Advisory Committee 2011/2012 Recommendations (Nov 28, 2012)

Introduction: Memorandum from the Central Square Advisory Committee 2011/2012 on its Final Recommendations
Full Report (reformatted in HTML) Goals
Public Places to Build Community Public Places elements
Retail, Cultural and Non-Profit Diversity Housing
Connecting People to the Square Foster a Sustainable Future for Central Square
Leverage Future Private and Public Investments Definition of Central Square Districts
Zoning Recommendations Transfer of Development Rights
Transportation Recommendations Location Specific Issues
Comments?

The Neverending Study of Central Square

Aug 11, 2012 - While preparing to write a series of essays on Central Square, I put together the following list of Central Square studies culled from a variety of sources. I have originals for most of these. If you know of any others, please let me know. - Robert Winters

Feb 1980 - CDD report entitled "Central Square - Commercial Area Revitalization District

June 1980 - CDD booklet entitled "Facade Improvements" with focus on Central Square

Apr 1983 - "Central Square Report" produced by City Council's Central Square Subcommittee (study began in 1980 or 1981)

1987 - A report produced in 1987 about a Subcommittee that allegedly built on the 1983 report (may be same as Central Square Action Plan)

Nov 1987 - Central Square Action Plan

1989 - Draft Central Square Development Guidelines

May 1993 - Results of the "Mayor's Forum on Central Square"

Oct 1993 - Report by the Committee to Promote and Enhance Central Square Now!

Aug 1994 - A Study of the Visual Images and Signage of Central Square (CDD)

May 1995 - Central Square Improvements Project, Master Plan Report

May 1995 - An Urban Design Plan for Central Square (executive summary)

May 2001 - Summary Notes from "A Conversation about Central Square"

Feb 2000 - The Gibbs Report, Central Square Commercial Market Study

Oct 2004 - Central Square, Cambridge - Rising Fortunes at a Regional Crossroads (Rekha Murthy)

Dec 2004 - Reviving a Traditional City - Central Square, Cambridge, gets a facelift (Rekha Murthy)

June 2005 - Street Media: Ambient Messages in an Urban Space - a photographic analysis of Central Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Rekha Murthy)

2009 - CDD Central Square Customer Intercept Survey Report

2011 - Central Square Market Profile

2011 - Red Ribbon Commission Study Report

2012 - Goody/Clancy report and recommendations

2013 - K2C2 Final Reports


THE TASTY DINER of HARVARD SQUARE - A film by Federico Muchnik (33½ minutes)

FYI - Current Rules and Goals: Cambridge City Council & Cambridge School Committee

City Council Rules 2010-2011 (adopted January 4, 2010 and amended April 5, 2010)

City Council Goals - FY2010-2011 (approved February 2, 2009)

City Council Committees (for the 2010-2010 term)


School Committee Rules (adopted January 7, 2008)

School Committee Goals (adopted October 7, 2008)


June 7, 2009 - Once upon a time there was a civic organization in Cambridge known as the Cambridge Civic Association (CCA). It was formed in 1945 out of several organizations that had been existed through the 1930s and that had lobbied the state legislature to create the Plan E Charter option (1938) which featured a city manager form of government and proportional representation elections for city council and school committee. These reforms were central to model charter reform movements active in the United States from the early 1900s. The central theme of the CCA in its early days was "good government" in the sense of being anti-patronage and for professionally managed local government. This changed with the introduction of rent control at the end of the 1960s after which the CCA shifted leftward and became permanently lashed to the mast of the rent control vessel. Though the CCA still exists on paper (I believe), it rapidly declined after the statewide abolition of rent control (late 1994) and essentially disappeared a decade later (early 2005).

I bring up the ghost of the CCA today only to point out that when it was created it had some very admirable goals. Here's the original Mission Statement of the CCA:

These are pretty good founding principles for a civic organization and I'm tempted to say that some should be incorporated into the recently adopted City Council's Goals for FY2010 (adopted Feb 2, 2009). In fact, of the 22 current goals, the only one that comes close is: "An increased level of recruitment and opportunities for membership on boards and commissions." The current Council goals emphasize things like "fostering community" via block parties and such, though one has to wonder if the City should be promoting these activities or just getting out of the way so that people can foster community on their own. The goals also seem to put some emphasis on developing "successful nightlife campaigns" while mentioning nothing about promoting ordinary "daytime" economic activity that supports the everyday needs of residents.

One founding principle of the CCA that fell into disuse over the years is listed above as #3: To encourage and support the candidacy of men and women seeking election to public office and to support intelligent, wholesome leadership in public affairs. Indeed, I can personally testify to the fact that in its dying years the only reason the CCA made endorsements at all was because the CCA-endorsed incumbents wanted the benefit of having an advertised CCA slate of candidates that would help secure their reelection. There was precious little effort to recruit new candidates or to support them. Today, the benefits of incumbency are greater than ever. The cost of political campaigns have become absurdly high and most of the incumbents now have (City paid) staff who are inevitably political appointees who directly or indirectly assist in the reelection efforts of their bosses. The deck is increasingly stacked against challengers. Furthermore, the salary and benefits for elected councillors are now so sweet that it is unlikely that any of them would ever want to move on to another job.

With this background in mind, I would like to encourage all Cambridge residents to help level the playing field by finding out about this year's challengers for seats on the Cambridge City Council and the Cambridge School Committee. This is not meant as a dig against any particular incumbent as much as an appeal to support the challengers in what is a difficult and laudable effort. Please see the Cambridge Candidate Pages for the current list of expected candidates. Then use your own judgment - don't expect me or anyone else to do it for you.

Speaking of this year's municipal election, there are some activists who are now expending great effort to attack the City Manager and most of the current City Council. That is not nor has it ever been the intention of the Cambridge Civic Journal or its editor. Candidates are now being seduced by financial promises from one angry fellow with a Brattle Street address and a basketful of grudges. Former CCA Executive Board members from its darkest and most manipulative days are oozing up from the civic swamp trying to at last make good on their failed campaigns of the early 1990s to oust city manager Bob Healy.

It's entertaining to watch people who have primarily earned disrespect in their civic efforts try to capitalize on the recent Monteiro jury decision as a means of realizing their decades-old vendettas. Conveniently forgotten in their recent letters to Cambridge's "oldest weekly newspaper" are the many achievements of City Manager Bob Healy, the strong financial position of the City, and the recent 8-1 vote of confidence bestowed upon Mr. Healy in granting him a three year contract extension. Also missing in this testimony is the fact that virtually all affirmative action in the hiring of employees and department heads has taken place on Mr. Healy's watch. These letters also fail to divulge how long these writers have been carrying their jealousy and anger toward Mr. Healy for actually orchestrating progress in Cambridge while the best they could ever do is snipe from the sidelines. - Robert Winters


This Old Land of Cambridge - The true story of the geological history of Cambridge - by George Ehrenfried
Sadly, George passed away (Jan 5, 2010) at the age of 96. He led many a geology-themed hike with the AMC Local Walks/Hikes.

Selected City of Cambridge References:

Plan E Charter (Cambridge's city charter) Acts of 1921, Chapter 239 as amended (establishment of Cambridge Election Commission)

Mass. General Laws Chapter 54A (governing Cambridge's PR elections)

Pen Portraits of Prominent People - by Henry J. Mahoney Editor, Cambridge Sentinel - 1923

This book was published c. 1923 and features very witty one-page “pen portraits” (with photo) of prominent Cantabrigians of the day. I'll be adding names alphabetically as time permits. There are 182 portraits in the book.

It comes to mind that there may be some value in expanding these profiles to other prominent Cantabrigians who arrived on the scene after 1923, including prominent Cantabrigians of today. With this in mind, I extend the invitation to any and all who may wish to contribute their own “pen portraits” of Cambridge people. Contributions do not necessarily have to be in the style of Mr. Mahoney. Inclusion is, as always, subject to the erratic discretion of the editor.

Special thanks to Karen Welch for sending me the book. - RW


Political History of Cambridge in the 20th Century
written by Glenn Koocher, November 2004 -- edited by Robert Winters, July 2006
 
[An alternate edit of this essay will appear, along with many other valuable essays, in a
centennial volume to be published by the Cambridge Historical Society in 2007.
]

Which People's Republic
written by Bill Cunningham, 1999


Cambridge School Volunteers is looking for people who can give one to two hours per week to help students in the Cambridge Public Schools, grades K through 12. No experience necessary. Call 617-349-6794 or e-mail csv@cpsd.us for more details.

Oliver Wendell Holmes – Morning Exercises of December 28, 1880
As recorded in the book 250th Anniversary of the Settlement of Cambridge (1881)


 
Robert Winters
Robert Winters, Editor
Cambridge Civic Journal
(about me - updated!!)
 
Philosophy of the CCJ Editor
 
faces
The Cambridge Civic Journal is an independent newsletter of civic affairs in the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is published as a public service by Central Square Publications. All items are written by Robert Winters unless otherwise noted. [Of course, I do sometimes forget.]

Thoughts for these times:
Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction. -- Blaise Pascal

''This is our fucking city, and nobody is gonna dictate our freedom. Stay strong.'' -- David Ortiz

Subscribe to the Cambridge Civic Journal.
Specify in your message whether you wish to receive each new e-mail version or if you wish to be notified when the online versions are available at this web site. Under no circumstances will the subscription list be made available to any third party.

“The Number One thing I would emphasize is that journalists and bloggers would do well to see themselves as partners in the provision of information and that each can benefit greatly from the other. I’ve never seen this as a competition. It is especially true these days that local papers and young journalists are not very well-versed in the communities they serve. Much of the institutional memory has either died out or been bought out.” -- Robert Winters, mathematician and creator of the Cambridge Civic Journal, an online publication about Cambridge, MA (rwinters.com)

Jorkin: “Come, come, Mr. Fezziwig, we’re good friends besides good men of business. We’re men of vision and progress. Why don’t you sell out while the going’s good? You’ll never get a better offer. It’s the age of the machine, and the factory, and the vested interests. We small traders are ancient history, Mr. Fezziwig.”

Fezziwig: “It’s not just for money alone that one spends a lifetime building up a business, Mr. Jorkin…. It’s to preserve a way of life that one knew and loved. No, I can’t see my way to selling out to the new vested interests, Mr. Jorkin. I’ll have to be loyal to the old ways and die out with them if needs must.”

Scrooge: “I think I know what Mr. Fezziwig means, sir.”

Jorkin: “Oh, you hate progress and money, too, do you?”

Scrooge: “I don't hate them, sir, but perhaps the machines aren’t such a good thing for mankind, after all.”

Memorable scene in "A Christmas Carol"



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