2017 CCJ Notes - January through June
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Members Sought for New City Manager’s Advisory Committee

City SealJan 13, 2017 – City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking volunteers to serve on the new City Manager’s Advisory Committee. Community input is a vital component of the decision making process in Cambridge and the City strives to engage and involve all stakeholders. In an effort to foster community collaboration and deepen the understanding of community issues, the City Manager is forming this new advisory Committee.

The City Manager’s Advisory Committee will consist of 12-15 residents and stakeholders who will meet at least quarterly to discuss issues happening in the city, develop working relationships, work with organizations, bring different opinions to the table, and work to resolve problems in advance.

Selection of individuals to serve on the City Manager’s Advisory Committee will be based on their ability to represent the diversity of the Cambridge community. The final group of committed participants selected will be broadly representative of many backgrounds including: small/local business community, large business community, non-profit community, neighborhood associations, higher education, arts community, primary/secondary education, public health and human services, housing advocacy, faith community, new immigrant/under represented communities, youth community, senior community, LGBTQ+ community, and mobility community (bike/transit/pedestrian).

Applicants should be Cambridge residents or individuals with a strong connection with the City.

For more information, contact Lee Gianetti, Director of Communication and Community Relations, at 617-349-3317 or lgianetti@cambridgema.gov. Letters of interest, including resume and/or applicable experience, can be sent via email or mail by the deadline of Friday, February 17, 2017 to:
City Manager Louis A. DePasquale
City of Cambridge
795 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139
E-mail: citymanager@cambridgema.gov


Update on December 3, 2016 Ten-Alarm Fire in Cambridge

City SealJan 24, 2017 – On Saturday afternoon December 3, 2016 a ten-alarm fire occurred in the Harrington/Wellington section of East Cambridge that damaged multiple residential buildings and automobiles. 18 buildings sustained varying degrees of damage and over 100 residents were displaced.

An exhaustive investigation that included the Cambridge Fire Department Fire Investigation Unit, the Cambridge Police Department as well as the Massachusetts State Police Fire and Explosion Investigation Unit commenced before the fire was brought under control. The investigation which lasted several weeks included numerous interviews of neighbors, contractors and eyewitnesses along with the review of many photos and videos from multiple sources. The elimination of alternate causes and sources of ignition were also part of the investigation.

It has been determined the fire originated at 35/37 Berkshire Street, on the left side, rear (known as the Bravo/Charlie corner) in and around some recycling bins that had remnants of construction debris from an ongoing gut/rehab of this property. The cause of the fire was careless disposal of smoking material by subcontractors working at the site on the day of the fire.

Despite the significant destruction, investigators were able to uncover the scene and locate this point of origin through the utilization of witnesses, photos and additional investigative methods.

The investigation into whether any criminal charges are appropriate remains open and ongoing. For this reason names are not being released at this time.


Members Sought to fill Vacancy on Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women

City SealJan 13, 2017 – City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking persons interested in serving on the Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women. Commissioners support staff in their mission to create and promote programs that increase public awareness and understanding of multiple issues affecting women and girls, particularly marginalized women and girls, within the city; advocate to improve the quality of women’s and girls’ lives; and build coalitions and partner with community organizations on these issues.

The Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women meets the second Wednesday of every month, from 6:30-8 p.m., at 51 Inman St., Cambridge, in the Women's Commission Conference Room, 2nd floor.

For more information, contact Kimberly Sansoucy, Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women, at 617-349-4695 or ksansoucy@cambridgema.gov. Letters of interest, including resume and/or applicable experience, can be sent via mail or e-mail by Friday, February 17, 2017 to:
Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager
City of Cambridge
795 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139
E-mail: citymanager@cambridgema.gov


Affordable Rental and Homeownership Information Sessions February 13

City SealJan 24, 2017 – The Housing Division of the city’s Community Development Department will be holding Rental and Homeownership Information Sessions on Monday, February 13, at 6 p.m. and 7 p.m., at the City Hall Annex, 344 Broadway, Cambridge. Housing personnel from the Community Development Department will be available to discuss the city’s affordable rental and homeownership programs. The sessions are free and open to all. No advance registration is necessary.

Currently, the Housing Division is accepting applications for the Homeownership Pool and the Rental Applicant Pool. Preference is given to Cambridge residents and families with children.

For more information, please contact us at housing@cambridgema.gov or 617-349-4622.


Evenings with Experts 2017

First Wednesday of each month, February through May 2017, 7:00pm-8:30pm
A free public lecture series presented by Grow Native Massachusetts at the Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway, Cambridge, MA 02138
For more information, visit us at http://grownativemass.org/programs/eveningswithexperts, or call 781-790-8921.
CEUs Available for each lecture: APLD (1.5 credits); NOFA-AOLCP (4 credits)

February 1 - Nurturing the Liberated Landscape
Larry Weaner, Author of Garden Revolution & Founder of Larry Weaner Landscape Associates
    All too often we think of gardens and landscapes as static compositions of carefully placed and managed plants. But a more dynamic and rewarding approach takes advantage of the unique characteristics of plant species and communities, working with ecological processes, not against them. Learn how designer Larry Weaner utilizes the natural adaptations and reproductive abilities of plants to create engaging, ever-evolving landscapes that bring new meaning to partnering with nature. Using examples from his own property and from client projects, Larry will share how this give-and-take approach results in compelling, low-maintenance landscapes that free plants to perform according to their natural abilities and liberate people from having to cater to their landscapes’ every need.
    Larry Weaner has been creating native landscapes since 1977. His work is nationally recognized and has received awards from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, Cultural Landscape Foundation, Garden Club of America, and others. His new book, Garden Revolution, is a “must read” for all who seek to integrate landscape design with ecological processes.


City of Cambridge Lifts Snow Emergency Parking Ban
Ban lifted as of 10:00am on Monday

Feb 13, 2017 – The Snow Emergency Parking Ban in effect will be lifted in the City of Cambridge as of 10:00am on Monday, February 13, 2017. Tow operations will continue until the ban is lifted. Residents parked in one of the City’s Snow Emergency Off-Street Parking locations should exit within 2 hours after it has been lifted to avoid being charged. Residents parked at the 52 Oxford Garage must exit within 2 hours of the ban being lifted.

City of Cambridge offices and library branches will be open on Monday, however, the Cambridge Public Schools are closed. Certain programs for the Department of Human Services Programs are operating on the following modified schedule:

There is no rubbish, recycling, or curbside compost collection on Monday, February 13 and all curbside trash and recycling daily pickup routes will be one day behind schedule for the remainder of this week.

The Department of Public Works (DPW) will continue to clear streets throughout the night, starting with major arteries. Your patience and participation in clearing sidewalks helps the City return streets and sidewalks to safe, passable conditions as quickly as possible. After major street clearing operations have been completed, crews will begin working on high traffic bus routes to clear snow from bus stops, ramps, and crosswalks.

City Ordinance requires property owners to remove snow from sidewalks next to their property or business within 12 hours of daytime snowfall and before 1:00pm when it has fallen overnight. Property owners must also remove or melt all ice within 6 hours of the time it forms. There is a $50 fine for each day of non-compliance.

Property owners are asked that when shoveling their sidewalks to please maintain a minimum of 36 inches clear width, so that people who use wheelchairs and other mobility devices (also parents using strollers, etc.) can navigate the sidewalk. The Cambridge Commission for Persons with Disabilities (CCPD) requests that a 48 inch clear width be created when possible – this gives an extra measure of safety. Additionally, CCPD urges residents and businesses to pay particular attention to the corners, where one sidewalk meets another – shovel the full length and width of curb ramps, so that pedestrians with disabilities can get to the crosswalks. Business owners are requested, if there is a disability parking space on the street near your storefront, to please take the extra time to shovel a clear path to that space, so that your customers with disabilities can visit your establishment. In particular, shovel a space wide enough so that vans with lifts can deploy the lift onto the sidewalk.

The City recognizes the effort that goes into shoveling out any vehicle parked on a city street during a snow event. However, residents may not use objects such as trash/recycling barrels, furniture items or any other item to save parking spots on public streets. These items will be treated as trash and disposed of by DPW.

The public can to follow updates on Twitter at @CambMA and on Facebook at CambridgeMA.Gov. The City uses the hash tag #CambMASnow on Twitter to help the public follow the conversation. In addition to following updates on the City’s website and social networks, members of the public are encouraged to sign-up to receive notification of snow emergency parking bans at: CambridgeMA.GOV/Snow.


City of Cambridge Declares Snow Emergency Parking Ban - AGAIN
Ban goes into effect at 8:00pm on February 12.
Due to the winter weather conditions, Cambridge Public Schools will be closed on Mon, Feb 13.

Feb 12, 2017 – A Snow Emergency Parking Ban will go into effect in the City of Cambridge beginning at 8:00pm on Sunday, February 12, 2017. Vehicles parked on streets that are signed “No Parking during a Snow Emergency” will be ticketed and towed until the ban is lifted.

There will be no rubbish, recycling, or curbside compost collection on Monday, February 13 because of weather conditions. All curbside trash and recycling daily pickup routes will be one day behind schedule for the remainder of this week.

Updated information will be available at CambridgeMA.GOV/Snow throughout the storm. In addition, the public is encouraged to follow updates on Twitter at @CambMA. The City will be utilizing the hash tag #CambMASnow on Twitter to help the public follow the conversation.

Below is important information from the City:

Please report any power outages directly to Eversource at 800-592-2000.

In addition to following updates on the City’s website and social networks, members of the public are encouraged to sign-up to receive notification of snow emergency parking bans at: CambridgeMA.GOV/Snow. As always, if you need immediate assistance, please contact the Police Department’s Non-Emergency Line at 617-349-3300.


City of Cambridge to Lift Snow Emergency Parking Ban as of 7:00am Friday (Feb 10)

Snow on BroadwayThe Snow Emergency Parking Ban in effect will be lifted in the City of Cambridge as of 7 A.M. on Friday, February 10, 2017. Tow operations will continue until the ban is lifted. Residents parked in one of the City’s Snow Emergency Off-Street Parking locations should exit within 2 hours after it has been lifted to avoid being charged. Residents parked at the 52 Oxford Garage must exit within 2 hours of the ban being lifted.

The Department of Public Works (DPW) will continue to clear streets throughout the night, starting with major arteries. Your patience and participation in clearing sidewalks helps the City return streets and sidewalks to safe, passable conditions as quickly as possible. After major street clearing operations have been completed, crews will begin working on high traffic bus routes to clear snow from bus stops, ramps, and crosswalks.

City Ordinance requires property owners to remove snow from sidewalks next to their property or business within 12 hours of daytime snowfall and before 1:00pm when it has fallen overnight. Property owners must also remove or melt all ice within 6 hours of the time it forms. There is a $50 fine for each day of non-compliance.

Property owners are asked that when shoveling their sidewalks to please maintain a minimum of 36 inches clear width, so that people who use wheelchairs and other mobility devices (also parents using strollers, etc.) can navigate the sidewalk. The Cambridge Commission for Persons with Disabilities (CCPD) requests that a 48 inch clear width be created when possible – this gives an extra measure of safety. Additionally, CCPD urges residents and businesses to pay particular attention to the corners, where one sidewalk meets another – shovel the full length and width of curb ramps, so that pedestrians with disabilities can get to the crosswalks. Business owners are requested, if there is a disability parking space on the street near your storefront, to please take the extra time to shovel a clear path to that space, so that your customers with disabilities can visit your establishment. In particular, shovel a space wide enough so that vans with lifts can deploy the lift onto the sidewalk.

The City recognizes the effort that goes into shoveling out any vehicle parked on a city street during a snow event. However, residents may not use objects such as trash/recycling barrels, furniture items or any other item to save parking spots on public streets. These items will be treated as trash and disposed of by DPW.

The public can to follow updates on Twitter at @CambMA and on Facebook at CambridgeMA.Gov. The City uses the hash tag #CambMASnow on Twitter to help the public follow the conversation. In addition to following updates on the City’s website and social networks, members of the public are encouraged to sign-up to receive notification of snow emergency parking bans at: CambridgeMA.GOV/Snow.

Broadway snow
Count your blessings. It was a lot worse in 2014.


Snow Emergency

A Snow Emergency Parking Ban will go into effect in the City of Cambridge beginning at 7:00am on Thurs, Feb 9, 2017. Vehicles parked on streets that are signed “No Parking during a Snow Emergency” will be ticketed and towed until the ban is lifted.

To assist residents in parking their vehicles, free parking is provided at a number of facilities beginning at 8:00pm on Wed, Feb 8, 2017.

Updated information will be available at CambridgeMA.GOV/Snow throughout the storm. In addition, the public is encouraged to follow updates on Twitter at @CambMA. The City will be utilizing the hash tag #CambMASnow on Twitter to help the public follow the conversation.

City of Cambridge buildings are closed on Feb 9.


Hello Recycling & Composting Neighbors! - January 2016

recycling symbolHoliday Tree Collection
Three Items That Can't Go in Curbside Trash or Recycling
What to Do with Broken String Lights?
Introducing Did You Know?
Glocal Challenge: CRLS Students Propose Ways to Reduce Food Waste in Cambridge
Stuff Swap at the Winter Farmers Market
We're Hiring!


Holiday Tree Collection

Holiday trees will be collected curbside with your trash/recycling until this Friday, January 13. Remove all decorations and the stand. Place bare trees (no plastic bags) at the curb with your trash and recycling.

Residents may also bring bare trees to the Recycling Center during open hours until January 31, 2017.


Three Items That Can't Go in Curbside Trash or Recycling

Cambridge has a goal of reducing waste by 30% by 2020, with a baseline of 2008. To reach this goal, DPW hired consultants to analyze Cambridge's trash and recycling. In our audits, we found the following items that shouldn't be put in trash or recycling:

  • Compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) contain mercury and should never be in the trash or recycling. To dispose of them properly, please bring CFLs to the Recycling Center or visit our website to a disposal site. Incandescent bulbs go in the trash.
  • Electronics (anything with a cord or battery) contain valuable metals and materials. Please take a moment to find out how to get rid of it right or call 617-349-4800.
  • Textiles, such as clothing, shoes, bedding, and just about any other clean textile can be recycled. Nonprofits such as Big Brother Big Sister, Goodwill, and Red Cross benefit from your donated textiles. Torn, ripped, or broken textiles ARE accepted for donation or recycling.

Chose to ReuseWhat to Do with Broken String Lights?

String lights can't be placed in curbside recycling. Electronics such as these should not be in the trash either. So what are your options?

  1. Bring to the Recycling Center during open hours for recycling.
  2. Ship them to HolidayLEDs.com for free and receive a 15% off discount on new string lights.
  3. Ship them to Christmas-Light-Source.com and they'll give you a discount and donate proceeds to Toys for Tots.

Introducing Did You Know?

Did You Know?To start 2017, we are introducing a new section to the newsletter: Did You Know? This section's goal is to inform our readers of different topics in the waste industry.

Did you know the 2014 Massachusetts food waste ban, the first such ban in the US, created 900 jobs and added millions of dollars to the economy?

ICF, a Cambridge consulting firm, published this analysis: "Commonwealth's Food Waste Reduction Initiative Creates 900 Jobs, $175 Million of Economic Activity."


Glocal Challenge: CRLS Students Propose Ways to Reduce Food Waste in Cambridge

The Glocal Challenge is an annual competition at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School (CRLS) to tackle a global issue at the local level.

GLocal ChallengeFor three months, students attended expert-led workshops and received mentorship from local professionals to tackle the issue of food waste in Cambridge.

Student teams pitch their ideas to judges and compete to win funding and paid internships from the City to implement their proposal. The top two teams will earn scholarships to the EF Global Leadership Summit in Italy this summer.

Cantabrigians are invited to attend the Glocal Challenge Finals and vote for your favorite project on January 19, 5:30-8:30pm at EF Education First.

Email glocalchallenge@ef.com to RSVP.


Stuff Swap at the Winter Farmers Market

Cambridge Winter Farmers Market will be hosting Buy Nothing Cambridge on Saturday, January 14th, 10am-12pm in the common room (upstairs from the gym where the market is located).

All are invited to share clothing, accessories, books, DVDs & small household items. Bring something or nothing and leave with a neighbor's previously loved items. No large/bulky items and no electronics. All remaining items will be donated. Cambridge Recycling will have a table and information on how to get rid of it right.


We're Hiring!

Cambridge Recycling is hiring a full-time Waste Reduction Program Manager.


  • recycling symbolMissed recycling or trash? Please use Commonwealth Connect and report it online or via mobile app (iPhone / Android) or call DPW at 617-349-4800 by 12 noon the day after collection.
  • Need toters, brochures, labels, or posters? Email recycle@cambridgema.gov or fill out this form.
  • Following a weekday holiday, curbside trash, recycling, compost and yard waste collection is delayed one day. Check the 2017 collection schedule.

Cambridge Human Services Commission Vacancy

City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking Cambridge residents interested in volunteering to serve on the nine-member Human Services Commission. The Commission advises the City Manager and the Assistant City Manager for Human Services on human services policy issues, needs assessment, and funding allocations.

City SealWorking in collaboration with the Department of Human Service Programs, the Commission also promotes activities that enhance the quality of life for Cambridge residents. Over the years, the Commission has responded to local needs by recommending Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding for a wide range of programs offered by the City of Cambridge and community agencies.

The Commission usually meets with the Assistant City Manager for Human Services on the second Thursday of each month, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Citywide Senior Center, 806 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge.

For more information, contact Mike Payack at 617-349-6208 or mpayack@cambridgema.gov. Commission members serve without compensation. Residents who wish to apply, may send a letter of interest and résumé by January 11, 2017, to:
Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager
City of Cambridge
795 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139

Martin Luther King Jr.: April 26, 1967, Cleveland (excerpt)

So, set out to do a good job and do that job so well that the living, the dead, or the unborn couldn’t do it any better. And let me say that we’ve got to prepare now to compete with people. Many of our parents have been so scarred by years of denial and neglect that they cannot face the same challenges that we face. But I say to you that you have the opportunity to assert certain things and get ready to compete with people. Don’t set out merely to do a good Negro job. If you’re setting out one day to be a good Negro doctor or a good Negro lawyer or a good Negro schoolteacher or a good Negro preacher or a good Negro skilled laborer or a good Negro barber or beautician, you have already flunked your matriculation exam for entrance into the university of integration.

Set out to do a good job and do that job so well that nobody can do it any better.

If it falls your lot to be a streetsweeper, sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures.

Sweep streets like Shakespeare wrote poetry.

Sweep streets like Beethoven composed music.

Sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will have to pause and say here lived a great streetsweeper who swept his job well.

This is what Douglas Malloch meant when he said, "If you can't be a pine on the top of the hill, be a scrub in the valley -- but be the best little scrub on the side of the rill. Be a bush, if you can't be a tree. If you can't be a highway, just be a trail. If you can't be the sun, be a star. It isn't by size that you win or you fail. Be the best of whatever you are!"

Full text of speech and audio recording here: http://blog.cleveland.com/pdextra/2012/01/martin_luther_king_jr_april_26.html


City Manager Appoints Brent B. Larrabee as Acting Commissioner of the Cambridge Police Department

Jan 9, 2017
To the Honorable, the City Council:

Effective Jan 9, 2017, I am appointing Brent B. Larrabee as Acting Commissioner of the Cambridge Police Department. Mr. Larrabee is taking over for Acting Commissioner Christopher Burke who is retiring on Jan 6, 2017 after 32 years of service on the Cambridge Police Department and 8 months as Acting Commissioner. Incoming Acting Commissioner Larrabee is expected to serve for the next 6-8 months until a permanent Commissioner is appointed, a position that he is not pursuing.

Brent Larrabee holds a Master of Public Administration from Framingham State College, has assisted in the selection of numerous Massachusetts Chiefs of Police, and has served as:

Former Commissioner Haas has known and worked with Brent Larrabee for many years. He highly respects him and strongly recommended Brent for appointment as Acting Commissioner for the Cambridge Police Department.

Very truly yours, Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager


Traffic

Jan 1, 2017 - It's interesting to occasionally look at the traffic numbers for my civic websites - especially the distinctive spikes that occur every two years around the time of the municipal election. In addition to the legitimate views, there is definitely some annoying Spam in the mix. I more aggressively filtered this starting in late 2014 (hence the dip), but even with the filters the traffic continues to grow. It does seem a bit curious that the hits are growing so far in advance of the 2017 municipal election. Perhaps there's more Spam to beat back, or maybe there's a high likelihood that this will be a very busy municipal election year. - RW


UPDATE (4:30pm): It is now reported that James Walter Morales has been taken into custody on Wheatland Street in Somerville.

CAMBRIDGE POLICE NOTICE: Bank Robbery in Central Square and Possible Suspect

Jan 5, 2017 – The FBI's Violent Crimes Task Force, along with the Cambridge Police Department, responded to an attempted bank robbery at Bank of America, 772 Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge earlier this morning.

The suspect is described as a black male, approximately 5'10", with a mustache, dark skin, husky build and wearing a black jacket, gray sweatshirt, black knit cap and black sneakers. He did pass a note, but did not manage to obtain any money.

As part of this investigation, we're running down every possible lead, working with our federal, state and local partners. While we do not have an identity of the suspect at this point in time, investigators are looking at the possibility that the suspect generally fits the description of escaped federal prisoner James Morales, who fled the Wyatt Detention Center last weekend. A photo of Morales is attached [after the photos taken at the bank].

Bank Robber - Jan 5, 2017

Bank Robber - Jan 5, 2017

Bank Robber - Jan 5, 2017

Morales Wanted

Alanna Mallon Announces Run For City Council
Founder of the Cambridge Weekend Backpack Program will run in November.

Jan 4, 2017 – As we enter this New Year and all that it promises to bring, I am excited and energized to declare myself as a candidate for Cambridge City Council this November.

Alanna MallonI was born and raised in Massachusetts, and I moved to Cambridge with my husband in the summer of 2004 and we are proud to call Cambridge home. We have two children, a third and sixth grader, both of whom have been enrolled in the Cambridge Public School system since they were in Junior Kindergarten. In 2013 as an active participant in our school community and civic life as a Cambridge resident, I became aware that food insecurity was a barrier for academic success for many of our students. This realization was a call to action, and I became determined to ensure that my childrens’ classmates had their basic needs met and could capitalize on the incredible CPS curriculum at every grade level.

I founded the Cambridge Weekend Backpack Program to address the needs of food-insecure students, but also to connect their families to other vital resources that are available in our community. This critical work was so important to me, that I left the private sector to focus on it full time. For the last three years I have passionately dedicated my life to working on issues of food insecurity in Cambridge and I have had the privilege and pleasure of helping schools, families, the business community and concerned residents form a partnership to help our students succeed.

For the past year, I have been a Program Director at Food For Free, working closely on issues of food insecurity in Cambridge not just for students, but for various vulnerable populations in Cambridge and the Greater Boston area. Through this work, I have come to realize that there is a link between the resources and services that residents need: affordable housing, access to high quality day care and early education opportunities, mental health and human services, and many more. I am truly energized at the thought of working on these linked issues for our residents and using my skills to build broad coalitions of support to find meaningful solutions to the complex issues and challenges that face our community members.

As Mayor David Maher’s Education Liaison for two years (2015-2016), I observed that dedicated public service combined with strategic public policy can be an effective tool to change our residents’ lives for the better. Our elected leaders have the power to impact how our funds are spent and where to direct our collective energies. Our city has a great many resources, but many who live here are facing significant challenges and their needs are not being met. We must work to ensure that those resources can be directed to those who may not have a voice in decision making.

It’s become clear after the national election that much of the important and critical governing work in the coming years will happen at the state and local levels. I also strongly feel that there need to be more women in government at every level, bringing their unique experiences and voices to policy decisions. These things combined with the damaging political rhetoric of the past year crystallized my decision to seek office in November. Given my experience, knowledge of our governing systems, and relationships with community partners, the time is right for me to bring these unique experiences to the Cambridge City Council. As City Councilor, I will work tirelessly to ensure that all city residents, including our most at risk, get the representation that they need and deserve at the highest level. My experience over the last few years has affirmed that the City of Cambridge is unparalleled in its focus on the needs of our most vulnerable residents, but that there is so much more that we can, and must do.

I love working, living, and raising my children in this city. I am inspired by my friends, neighbors, and colleagues who, through their daily efforts in the neighborhoods of Cambridge, make our city a better place to live and work. There is no place I’d rather be at this moment in history, and it would be a privilege to serve as a City Councilor.

Alanna Mallon