2018 CCJ Notes - July through December
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Turnout figures for Early Voting (2018 - State Election)

2018 Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri
Early Voting Location (2018) Oct 22 Oct 23 Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Total
Main Library (449 Broadway) 222 177 206 158 180 286 275 265 338 296 547 2950
Election Commission (51 Inman St.) 297 170 245 143 169 138 305 276 449 359 588 3139
O'Neill Library (Rindge Ave.) 175 96 137 94 142 159 193 114 286 206 331 1933
Water Department (at Fresh Pond) 183 145 112 111 152 200 175 163 225 194 329 1989
Police Department (East Cambridge) 153 55 86 90 103 92 145 113 215 152 291 1495
All Locations 1030 643 786 596 746 875 1093 931 1513 1207 2086 11506

Turnout figures for Early Voting (2016 - Federal Election)

2016 Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri  
Early Voting Location (2016) Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 4 Total
Main Library (449 Broadway) 619 396 465 262 289 688 483 376 624 436 848 5486
Election Commission (51 Inman St.) 576 399 465 304 304 401 532 399 571 455 564 4970
O'Neill Library (Rindge Ave.) 387 208 302 171 207 373 273 216 395 279 478 3289
Water Department (at Fresh Pond) 368 207 218 131 157 429 233 216 348 254 474 3035
Police Department (East Cambridge) 290 186 225 93 104 263 251 205 349 260 508 2734
All Locations 2240 1396 1675 961 1061 2154 1772 1412 2287 1684 2872 19514

Total Cambridge ballots cast in the 2016 Election was 53,282 (including Early Voting). 36.6% of ballots cast were done via Early Voting.


Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Confirmed in Cambridge

Ash treeEmerald Ash BorerAug 23, 2018 - On Monday, August 20, 2018, the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) confirmed that Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been found in Cambridge. EAB is particularly concerning because of the speed at which it kills Ash trees, generally within 1-3 years. Standing dead ash trees present a public safety risk due to how quickly their brittle branches will fail.

The City of Cambridge was the first municipality in New England to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy to protect the ash tree population on city property. Healthy Ash trees on city property, including street trees, have been protected from EAB through proactive treatments of TreeAzin over the past 3 years. TreeAzin is a product derived from seed extracts of the Neem tree and is administered by injection at the trunk of the tree. TreeAzin is listed by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) for use in organic production in the U.S. This pesticide is not hazardous to humans or animals. For more information on the City’s treatment program for EAB, please visit: www.cambridgema.gov/EAB

How do I know if I have an Ash tree?
According to University of Connecticut College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources Tree Guide, Ash trees have four identifying features:

  1. Ash trees have compound leaves comprised of 7 to 11 leaflets.
  2. The twigs are smooth, rigid and grayish and resemble bones.
  3. The bark of mature trees is deeply furrowed.
  4. They have opposing branches.

Ash tree
excerpted from http://clear.uconn.edu/info/EAB_quick_reference_guide.pdf

I have an Ash tree. What do I do?
If you have an ash tree on your property, please consider one of the following:

For additional questions or concerns regarding Emerald Ash Borer in Cambridge, contact the City’s Urban Forestry staff at cambridgetree@cambridgema.gov.

Emerald Ash Borer Fact Sheet (DCR)


City of Cambridge Designated Early Voting Sites Locations, Dates and Hours for the State Election, November 6, 2018

Vote!Early voting will begin on October 22nd and continue through November 2nd for the State Election to be held on Tuesday, November 6th. In 2016, Massachusetts voters were given the opportunity to vote prior to Election Day through early voting. Previously the only way a registered voter could vote prior to Election Day was through absentee voting. Although absentee voting is still available for registered voters who qualify, only those who will be absent from their city or town on Election Day or have a disability that prevents them from going to the polls, or have a religious belief preventing the same, are legally allowed to vote by absentee ballot.

Unlike absentee voting, early voting is for every registered voter. Registered voters do not need an excuse or reason to vote early. Regardless of whether a voter wants to take advantage of early voting, vote absentee or vote on Election Day, the first step is making sure you are registered. To check to see if you are registered to vote, and to find information on how to register to vote, you may visit the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s website: www.sec.state.ma.us/ele. If you need to register to vote, you may do it online by visiting: www.RegisterToVoteMA.com. All you need is a license or an I.D. issued by the Registry of Motor Vehicles to apply online. To be eligible to vote in the November 6th State Election, you must register to vote or make any necessary changes to your voter registration by the deadline of Wednesday, October 17th at 8pm.

Early voting can be done in person or by mail. In the City of Cambridge, early voting can be done in person at any of the five (5) designated early voting sites during the scheduled dates and times. Please note, however, once a voter has cast an early voting ballot, the voter may no longer vote at the polls on Election Day.

To request a ballot by mail, simply fill out an application or send us a written request with your name, Cambridge address, address where you want the ballot sent and your signature and mail it to the Election Commission, 51 Inman Street, Cambridge, MA 02139. You can download an application at www.CambridgeMA.gov/EarlyVoting.

We encourage all our citizens to exercise their right and take advantage of the opportunity to vote at one of the sites during the scheduled dates and times. For public convenience, the City of Cambridge will also offer weekday evening hours and weekend hours on Saturday, October 27, 2018 from 9am to 5pm.

CITY OF CAMBRIDGE EARLY VOTING SCHEDULE

LOCATION 1st Week - DATE & TIME 2nd Week - DATE & TIME
City of Cambridge Election Commission Office
51 Inman Street, 1st Floor
Mon, October 22, 8:30am to 8:00pm
Tues, October 23, 8:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 24, 8:30am to 8:00pm
Thurs, October 25, 8:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, October 26, 8:30am to 6:00pm
Sat, October 27, 9:00am to 5:00pm
Mon, October 29, 8:30am to 8:00pm
Tues, October 30, 8:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 31, 8:30am to 8:00pm
Thurs, November 1, 8:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, November 2, 8:30am to 6:00pm
Police Department, Community Room
1st Floor, 125 Sixth Street
Mon, October 22, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 23, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 24, 12:00am to 8:00pm
Thurs, October 25, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, October 26, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Sat, October 27, 9:00am to 5:00pm
Mon, October 29, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 30, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 31, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Thurs, November 1, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, November 2, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Cambridge Water Department
250 Fresh Pond Parkway
Mon, October 22, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 23, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 24, 12:00am to 8:00pm
Thurs, October 25, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, October 26, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Sat, October 27, 9:00am to 5:00pm
Mon, October 29, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 30, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 31, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Thurs, November 1, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, November 2, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Main Library
449 Broadway
Mon, October 22, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 23, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 24, 12:00am to 8:00pm
Thurs, October 25, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, October 26, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Sat, October 27, 9:00am to 5:00pm
Mon, October 29, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 30, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 31, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Thurs, November 1, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, November 2, 9:30am to 6:00pm
O’Neill Library
70 Rindge Ave.
Mon, October 22, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 23, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 24, 12:00am to 8:00pm
Thurs, October 25, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, October 26, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Sat, October 27, 9:00am to 5:00pm
Mon, October 29, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Tues, October 30, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Wed, October 31, 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Thurs, November 1, 9:30am to 6:00pm
Fri, November 2, 9:30am to 6:00pm

Oct 7 - I recently merged the most recent voter history file from the Sept 4 Primary with my mega-database going back to 1997. If you have ever wondered how many people have voted in every Cambridge citywide election since then (including municipal elections, federal elections, primary elections, and special elections), there are now only 116 of us (and I personally know at least 52 of those 116). Maybe we should form a club. - RW

PS - I'll do some histograms and other goodies from the latest data when I have a few minutes to spare. I also take requests.


Cambridge City Manager Seeks Members for Commission on Immigrant Rights and Citizenship - deadline extended

City SealSept 18, 2018 – Cambridge City Manager Louis DePasquale is seeking persons interested in serving on the Cambridge Commission on Immigrant Rights and Citizenship (CIRC). The Commission consists of 11 volunteer members, who are appointed by the City Manager, following an application and interview process. The term of the appointment is three years. Commissioners are expected to be knowledgeable about immigrant rights and citizenship and must be residents of Cambridge. It is desirable for this Commission to be fully representative of the diverse Cambridge community.

Cambridge welcomes immigrants and wants to encourage their success and access to opportunity and advancement in this country. It will be a goal of this Commission to get the message of welcome out, through collaboration with organizations that already provide services and outreach to our immigrant community. The Commission will act as a centralizing organization in Cambridge, to address immigrant rights and citizenship issues through providing information, referral, guidance, coordination and technical assistance to other public agencies and private persons, organizations and institutions engaged in activities and programs intended to support immigrant rights and citizenship.

Commissioners are expected to work with other members of the Commission and staff to fulfill the goals and objectives of the Cambridge Commission on Immigrant Rights and Citizenship Ordinance (CMC Chapter 2.123).

Individuals interested in being considered should apply by using the city’s online application system at www.cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and résumé or summary of applicable experience can be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. The deadline for submitting applications is not yet determined.


Speaking Freely - A few thoughts on the proposal to grant certain non-profit developers the right to build far more densely than others

Sept 29 - An interesting discussion is starting to develop on neighborhood listservs and on Facebook regarding a proposed "100% Affordable Housing Overlay". Here are a few thoughts (by me) from a couple of Facebook discussions on the issue. Pardon what may seem at times like "one hand clapping", but I selected only my comments out of the conversation(s).

If this proposal succeeds to game the system to deliver parcels to specific subsidized housing developers, the next step will be for city councillors to significantly increase the amount of taxpayer dollars available to develop those properties. And if you question any aspect of this, get ready to be maligned. If zoning limitations on height or density mean anything at all, they should be uniformly applied to ALL and not rigged to favor certain developers.

I think there's a lot of political pressure going on behind the scenes here in addition to the public meetings. The misinformation and misrepresentation being spread around is astonishing. I bought my multi-family house on a busy street with neighboring buildings almost within arms reach and no driveway not because I wanted those things but because I could not afford to do otherwise. If I had the resources to buy a house on a quiet street with a driveway and maybe even a garage I would have done that. The people who bought houses in lower density parts of the city and on quiet streets did so because that's what they wanted and they paid accordingly. That was not the manifestation of evil thoughts. It was simply a choice. Our current City Council apparently leans toward disrespecting the choices of its own residents. They have always had the capacity to create more subsidized housing by raising taxes and answering to the voters at the next election. I do believe they should be considering some density increases in most zones and allowing multi-family buildings in all zones in order to increase housing capacity, but it appears that more attention is being paid to social engineering than to the provision of housing.

You may not believe this but I have often been accused of being conflict-averse. It's actually kind of true. I generally choose to walk away from a fight. It takes a lot to get me going, and what it usually takes is a boatload of mendacity.

One of my greatest objections to the "Our Revolution" crowd that has inserted itself into Cambridge political discourse is the underlying agenda that property ownership is inherently evil and that it should be constrained whenever and wherever possible. We saw this with the "tenants right of first refusal" effort earlier this year which fortunately did not succeed. The political playbook is apparently to draw attention to those property owners and developers who behave badly and then apply the broad brush of condemnation to all property owners. This is why I steadfastly refuse to support any candidate who is associated with the "Our Revolution" cult. By the way, I have provided affordable housing to my tenants for 33 years without any prompting from government or activists. I am not alone.

I have to agree regarding the hypocrisy. I still often find myself "at the table" even when others object to my viewpoint. Indeed, I'm the only person on the Envision Cambridge Advisory Committee or the Envision Cambridge Housing Working Group who has never missed a meeting. Normally I would be very hesitant about speaking out while still serving on either body, but apparently other members feel no such constraint and I am very concerned about how things are being misrepresented. I'm also starting to get a bit concerned that these advisory committees may not be seriously heard, especially when viewpoints expressed do not align with City staff.

If CDD said they think this will produce NO subsidized housing (I prefer that term to "affordable") I'm inclined to believe they were being disingenuous in order to sell the proposal by minimizing objections. It should be OBVIOUS that they believe it will deliver at least some subsidized housing or they would not be forwarding the proposal.

As I stated, my expectation is that some subsidized housing may be produced. My chief objection is that one property owner will still have strict zoning restrictions while a neighboring property will be allowed up to four times the density if the owner/developer builds subsidized housing. I have provided affordable housing for 33 years and I cannot add an additional square foot to my property, yet those rules would be obliterated for a "non-profit" developer who may well charge "affordable" rents that are greater than mine.

I completely agree. I have never liked the fact that Cambridge has often "processed things to death", but the current trend is worse. The new Machiavellian norm is to ram something through and deal with the fallout later or not at all or, more likely, create a series of sham public meetings after all decisions have been made where only the color of the brick may be debated.

Let me add that I really hope this doesn't turn into a "green vs. affordable" false dichotomy. The real issue here is whether changes in City zoning policies should run roughshod over current regulations. Some changes are in order - as long as the zoning principles are applied uniformly. Enhancing and protecting tree canopy is a separate issue that deserves its own debate.

The next time I hear a City official say "no decisions have been made" when you know damn well that they have I may actually scream.

One consideration that does deserve attention is the fact that there are many properties now that are nonconforming because zoning limits were reduced long after these buildings were built. There is something to be said for having zoning regulations at least somewhat match the current built environment rather than be set artificially low. This shouldn't be a blank check. Some locations have buildings way above the surrounding neighborhood and I would never suggest that limits should be based on those exceptions. If so, East Cambridge would be nothing but Sullivan Courthouse buildings.

One fundamental problem here is that City staff and elected officials like to refer to "affordable housing" being a high priority for residents in order to justify any given policy. It's certainly true that people want housing to be affordable in the sense that a typical person or family can find a place to buy or rent within their budget, but this is not the same as advocating for a dramatic increase in subsidized housing (of which Cambridge already has a significant amount when you add up all the Housing Authority properties, Inclusionary housing units, etc.). Indeed, I think an argument can be made that the singular focus on subsidized housing may be contributing to the non-affordability of housing generally. The best affordable housing program ever conceived was the proliferation of multi-family housing, and that involved no government subsidy at all.

- Robert Winters


Deadline to Register to Vote and Availability of Absentee Ballots for the State Election, November 6th

The State Election will be held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. For Cambridge residents not already registered, the last day to register to vote is Wednesday, October 17, 2018 until 8:00pm. The Office of the Secretary of State has developed an Online Voter Registration System at www.registertovotema.com. Individuals may use the online system to submit an online application, update their address or change their party affiliation. You must have a valid driver's license, learner's permit, or non-driver ID issued by the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV). If you do not have an RMV ID you can use the system to create an application. Print and sign the completed form and mail or bring it to the office of the Cambridge Election Commission.

Absentee Ballots are now available at the Cambridge Election Commission office. Any voter who is unable to go to the polls on Election Day due to physical disability, religious belief, or absence from the City may request an Absentee Ballot from the Commission. The deadline to apply for an absentee ballot is Monday, November 5th at noon. Absentee Ballots may be mailed to voters, or such voters may choose to vote at the Commission office during regular city office hours: Monday, 8:30am-8:00pm; Tuesday-Thursday, 8:30am-5:00pm; Friday, 8:30am-Noon.

The polls will be open on Election Day, November 6th from 7:00am until 8:00pm. For any additional information, please visit the Cambridge Election Commission office at 51 Inman Street, call 617-349-4361 or visit our website at www.cambridgema.gov/election.


Members Sought for New River Street Infrastructure and Streetscape Design Project Working Group

Sept 19, 2018 – The City of Cambridge is seeking volunteers to serve on a new Working Group to help guide the River Street Infrastructure and Streetscape Design Project. The group will advise City Manager Louis A. DePasquale and his staff on key issues related to the planning and design for this important project, which has three main components:City Seal

The working group will consist of 12-15 members who will meet monthly for a period of 9-12 months, starting late fall 2018. The group will include residents, business, and institutional representatives and subject matter experts and who will work with city staff and a consultant to develop design principles and alternative design options. The process will culminate in a final design for River Street and Carl Barron Plaza, which will proceed into construction.

Individuals with interest in the River Street corridor, Central Square/Carl Barron Plaza, experience or expertise in relevant topics — transportation, accessibility, urban design and placemaking, landscape architecture, green infrastructure — and a demonstrated ability to work effectively with diverse viewpoints to craft consensus solutions are encouraged to apply. Meetings of the Working Group will be open to the public.

For additional questions about the new Working Group, contact Jerry Friedman, Supervising Engineer, Department of Public Works at 617-349-9720 or jfriedman@cambridgema.gov.

Individuals interested in being considered should apply by using the city’s online application system at www.cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and résumé or summary of applicable experience can be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. The deadline for submitting applications is Friday, October 12, 2018.


Share your opinions! 2018 Cambridge Resident Opinion Survey now open

In its ongoing efforts to identify ways to better serve the community, the City of Cambridge is currently conducting its biennial Resident Opinion Survey. The survey, which has been conducted since 2000, serves as an important evaluation tool that enables residents to rate city services and offer input on what the City of Cambridge does well and where it can make improvements.

The survey takes about 10 minutes to complete. Don’t miss this opportunity to let us know how you feel!

Take the 2018 Online City of Cambridge Public Opinion Survey.

Opinion Dynamics Corporation (ODC), a national public opinion polling firm with its own state-of-the-art telephone calling facility, will be coordinating the Resident Opinion Survey. ODC will be randomly calling 400 Cambridge households (a sub-set of which will be cell-phone only households) on behalf of the city to complete the survey. Every household will have an equal chance of being called.

A hard copy of the Resident Opinion Survey can be completed September 17 - October 1, 2018 during business hours at the following locations:

For additional information, please contact Lee Gianetti at 617-349-3317 or by email lgianetti@cambridgema.gov.


Fans of Ranked Voting See an Opportunity in Massachusetts (Sept 17, 2018, New York Times)
After the recount in the Mass. 3rd Congressional District, Lori Trahan's margin over Dan Koh increased from 122 to 145 votes and Dan Koh conceded. The victorious candidate had only 20.9% of the votes in this 10-candidate plurality winner-take-all election. Honestly, if the Massachusetts State Legislature can't understand the need to move to election systems that address problems of vote-splitting, spoilers, and other perverse effects then they really need to get educated or seek other employment. It's equally absurd that the victor in a relatively low turnout Democratic Primary should have no opponent in the General Election in November, but that's another conversation. You have to wonder why Massachusetts politicos continue to call themselves "progressive" (whatever that means) when they can't get basic things like fair elections right. [Note: No slight of the victorious Ms. Trahan intended - she's a great candidate who will likely prove to be a great representative in Congress.] - RW


Cambridge man arrested for Craigslist post offering to buy cop killers a drink (Sept 19, 2018, Cambridge Chronicle)
First it was that butthead on Essex Street, and now another butthead on University Road. Can we banish people from the Peoples Republic?

And for some really GREAT news:
Salvation for Sancta Maria: Nursing facility to remain open in Cambridge (Sept 17, 2018, Cambridge Chronicle)


Annual Bow Tie Ride – Sunday, September 30
Assemble at 9:30am at the Cambridge Public Library Main Branch (449 Broadway). Ride departs at 10:00am.

Bow TiesJoin the Cambridge Bicycle Committee for the most stylish bike ride in Cambridge! On this leisurely two-hour ride, we'll trace the bow-tie shaped boundaries of the city and celebrate cycling in Cambridge!

We will assemble at and depart from the Cambridge Public Library Main Branch. Midway through the ride, there will be a brief break at Danehy Park. As in other years, the ride will be supported by the Cambridge Police Department and there will be rolling street closures. We ask that riders be able to maintain a moderate pace to stick with the group.

The ride will end back at the Cambridge Public Library with a light snacks and a raffle. Thank you to our sponsor OoOtie for bringing the fashionable fun!

The ride will be postponed in the case of heavy rain. Announcements regarding rain will be sent to this email list and posted on www.cambridgebikes.org. There is no registration or charge for the tour -- just show up and enjoy!

Bow ties encouraged, but not required.


Free Document Shredding in Cambridge Saturday, Sept 29

The Cambridge Consumers’ Council will be helping residents safely dispose of unwanted records at a free document shredding event on Saturday, Sept 29, from 9am–1pm, at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. Reserved Parking is available on Bigelow St.Information Security Begins with You!

Documents will be destroyed on the spot in a highly advanced technical mobile shredding truck and sent for recycling. Information for consumer rights and safety will be available. Please note that this is event is based on first come, first served, or until the truck is full to capacity. Limit 5 paper size boxes per household or equivalent.

For more information, or to request a reasonable accommodation, please call the Consumers’ Council at 617-349-6150 or visit CambridgeMa.Gov/ConsumersCouncil.


Danehy Park Family Day – Saturday, Sept 15, 11am-4pm

Aug 29, 2018 – The City of Cambridge will host the 23rd Annual Danehy Park Family Day on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 11am-4pm. Enjoy a fun-filled day of children's amusement rides, live music, roving performers, arts and crafts, face painting, plus free hot dogs, chips, juice boxes, and T-shirts and kites (while supplies last)! Rain Date is Sunday, Sept. 16.

Danehy Park is a 55-acre facility located at 99 Sherman Street and New St. in North Cambridge. This free event, sponsored by the City of Cambridge, attracts over 4,000 people annually and offers something for everyone.

Free shuttle buses will be running throughout Cambridge neighborhoods and from the Alewife MBTA Station. Danehy Park can also be reached by #74 bus or #78 bus from Harvard Square; or #83 bus from Central Square. Picnics and lawn chairs are encouraged.

For more information, including entertainment schedule and shuttle bus pick-up locations, visit www.cambridgema.gov/DanehyParkFamilyDay.

Danehy Park Family Day


September 4, 2018 State Primary
Official Turnout - Cambridge
Ward/Precinct Registered Voters Ballots Cast Turnout %
1-1 2410 657 27%
1-2 1968 595 30%
1-3 2275 700 31%
2-1 2020 517 26%
2-2 973 96 10%
2-3 1419 269 19%
3-1 2050 619 30%
3-2 1264 419 33%
3-2A 981 272 28%
3-3 2102 616 29%
4-1 2366 850 36%
4-2 2485 801 32%
4-3 878 240 27%
5-1 2230 814 37%
5-2 2332 907 39%
5-3 1730 677 39%
6-1 2332 795 34%
6-2 2246 649 29%
6-3 2289 825 36%
7-1 2202 798 36%
7-2 1349 358 27%
7-3 1028 176 17%
8-1 1792 517 29%
8-2 1700 503 30%
8-3 879 98 11%
9-1 2454 1003 41%
9-2 2734 996 36%
9-3 2240 764 34%
10-1 2581 929 36%
10-2 2460 1071 44%
10-3 2203 821 37%
11-1 2691 516 19%
11-2 2746 1263 46%
11-3 2258 1032 46%
TOTAL 67667 22163 33%

Sept 2014 State Primary Sept 2018 State Primary
wd pct Reg 1994 Voted 1994 Pct 1994 wd pct Registered Voters Ballots Cast Turnout %
1 1 1981 294 14.8% 1 1 2410 657 27.3%
1 2 1839 343 18.7% 1 2 1968 595 30.2%
1 3 1975 352 17.8% 1 3 2275 700 30.8%
2 1 1982 240 12.1% 2 1 2020 517 25.6%
2 2 872 20 2.3% 2 2 973 96 9.9%
2 3 1380 143 10.4% 2 3 1419 269 19.0%
3 1 1971 246 12.5% 3 1 2050 619 30.2%
3 2 1239 173 14.0% 3 2 1264 419 33.1%
3 02A 962 127 13.2% 3 02A 981 272 27.7%
3 3 2167 292 13.5% 3 3 2102 616 29.3%
4 1 2346 414 17.6% 4 1 2366 850 35.9%
4 2 2525 444 17.6% 4 2 2485 801 32.2%
4 3 939 134 14.3% 4 3 878 240 27.3%
5 1 2079 386 18.6% 5 1 2230 814 36.5%
5 2 2250 438 19.5% 5 2 2332 907 38.9%
5 3 1699 333 19.6% 5 3 1730 677 39.1%
6 1 2280 468 20.5% 6 1 2332 795 34.1%
6 2 2260 412 18.2% 6 2 2246 649 28.9%
6 3 2335 528 22.6% 6 3 2289 825 36.0%
7 1 2180 559 25.6% 7 1 2202 798 36.2%
7 2 1546 200 12.9% 7 2 1349 358 26.5%
7 3 1253 93 7.4% 7 3 1028 176 17.1%
8 1 1802 309 17.1% 8 1 1792 517 28.9%
8 2 1767 409 23.1% 8 2 1700 503 29.6%
8 3 1017 67 6.6% 8 3 879 98 11.1%
9 1 2478 878 35.4% 9 1 2454 1003 40.9%
9 2 2435 683 28.0% 9 2 2734 996 36.4%
9 3 2239 645 28.8% 9 3 2240 764 34.1%
10 1 2406 637 26.5% 10 1 2581 929 36.0%
10 2 2398 762 31.8% 10 2 2460 1071 43.5%
10 3 2162 417 19.3% 10 3 2203 821 37.3%
11 1 1968 156 7.9% 11 1 2691 516 19.2%
11 2 2609 698 26.8% 11 2 2746 1263 46.0%
11 3 2013 543 27.0% 11 3 2258 1032 45.7%
Total  65354 12843 19.7% Total 67667 22163 32.8%

The Marvelous Manholes of Massachusetts (Atlas Obscura, Aug 28, 2018)


Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women Vacancy

City SealAug 15, 2018 – Cambridge City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking persons interested in serving on the Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women.

The Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women works in an inclusive manner to promote equity and justice for women and girls and advocates on their behalf with City departments and officials, local organizations and state government to increase their opportunities through program development, policy recommendations and public awareness in key issue areas identified by the Commission as significantly affecting women and girls. Commissioners support staff in their mission to create and promote programs that increase public awareness and understanding of multiple issues affecting women and girls, particularly marginalized women and girls, within the city; advocate to improve the quality of women’s and girls’ lives; and work to build coalitions and partner with other community organizations on these issues.

The Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women meets the second Wednesday of every month, from 6:30-8 p.m., at 51 Inman St., Cambridge, in the Women's Commission Conference Room, 2nd floor.

For more information about the Commission, contact Kimberly Sansoucy, Executive Director, at 617-349-4695 or ksansoucy@cambridgema.gov.

Individuals interested in being considered should apply by using the city’s online application system at www.cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and résumé or summary of applicable experience can be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. The deadline for submitting applications is Friday, September 14, 2018.


Primary Election Results (selected contested races)

Candidate Total Pct. Cambridge (100%) Pct.
Governor (Democrat) - 100% reporting     Total = 18906  
Jay Gonzalez - star 346,873 64.42% 10,590 56.0%
Bob Massie 191,622 35.58% 8,151 43.1%
write-ins     165 0.9%
blanks     2,066  
Governor (Republican) - 100% reporting     Total = 925  
Charlie Baker - star 173,776 63.89% 692 74.8%
Scott Lively 98,214 36.11% 232 25.1%
write-ins     1 0.1%
blanks     25  
Lt. Governor (Democrat) - 100% reporting     Total = 18332  
Quentin Palfrey - star 305,771 58.91% 8,568 46.7%
Jimmy Tingle 213,313 41.09% 9,722 53.0%
write-ins     42 0.2%
blanks     2,640  
Secretary of State (Democrat) - 100% reporting     Total = 19338  
William Galvin - star 433,213 67.56% 9,486 49.1%
Josh Zakim 208,011 32.44% 9,826 50.8%
write-ins     26 0.1%
blanks     1,634  
Massachusetts US Senate (Republican) - 100% reporting     Total = 870  
Geoff Diehl - star 143,735 55.3% 373 42.9%
John Kingston 69,429 26.7% 275 31.6%
Beth Lindstrom 46,614 17.9% 215 24.7%
write-ins     7 0.8%
blanks     80  
District 7, US House, Massachusetts (Democratic) - 100% reporting     Total = 10639  
Ayanna Pressley - star 59,815 58.6% 6,006 56.5%
Mike Capuano 42,252 41.4% 4,626 43.5%
write-ins     7 0.1%
blanks     180  
Middlesex County District Attorney (Democratic) - 100% reporting     Total = 17781  
Marian Ryan - star 93,850 53.34% 8,164 45.9%
Donna Patalano 82,099 46.66% 9,583 53.9%
write-ins     34 0.2%
blanks     3,191  
State Representative - 25th Middlesex District (Democratic) - 100% reporting     Total = 6663  
Marjorie Decker - star 5,666 85.0% 5,666 85.0%
Lesley Philiips 984 14.8% 984 14.8%
write-ins 13 0.2% 13 0.2%
blanks 744   744  

Unofficial Results do not include Write-In, Auxiliary, Overseas Absentee or Provisional Ballots


How will I vote in Tuesday's Primary?

Sept 2, 2018 – The Massachusetts State Primary is now just two days away and we'll just have to wait and see who shows up to vote (because that's often what determines the outcome in elections like this). I never comment on my choices in municipal elections, but I think I can reveal my voting preferences for the Democratic Primary without trashing the objectivity of the CCJ for municipal elections.Vote!

I generally leave blank any uncontested elections because, well, why express a choice when you don't really have one? I make exceptions for candidates I actually like personally. So here goes:

Governor: Jay Gonzalez - He has worked in state government and he strikes me as thoughtful and practical. He also called me personally asking for my vote and, like most voters, that does sway me a bit. He comes across as eminently reasonable. His primary opponent, Bob Massie, comes across as an ideologue and, besides, my general rule is that if the Our Revolution gang likes a candidate I'm almost guaranteed to vote against that candidate. Regardless who the Democratic nominee is, he'll have an incredibly uphill battle against Charlie Baker. The choice of nominee for Lt. Governor could potentially alter that political calculus. See below.

Lieutenant Governor: Jimmy Tingle - The single most important quality I look for in a political candidate is his or her willingness to listen, learn, and potentially modify a position based on a better understanding. Jimmy has these qualities. He also has a sense of humor and, as perhaps my greatest political mentor once said to me, a good sense of humor is the best sign of a healthy mind. (Mr. Trump, by the way, has a nearly nonexistent sense of humor.) Jimmy also grew up down the street from where I live and, as Tip O'Neill says, "All politics is local." Quentin Palfrey is a pretty good "resumé candidate" who has and will perform admirably in governmental roles, but I doubt if he could ever be as receptive or as passionate as Jimmy Tingle in taking on whatever roles may be assigned to the next Lt. Governor. All this aside, the most important reason for Democrats to choose Jimmy Tingle is that he may actually sway some of the many voters who like Gov. Charlie Baker to vote for the Democratic ticket. I may be one of those voters. In any case, it will be an uphill battle to unseat Charlie Baker who is, by almost all accounts, enormously popular.

Secretary of State: Bill Galvin - The job of Secretary of State is more administration than policy, and Bill Galvin has done an extraordinary job running his office. He has modernized operations and is very receptive to the viewpoints of city and town clerks and elections officials across the Commonwealth. He has been criticized by his opponent (Josh Zakim) for not acting swiftly to enact several proposed reforms but, in each case, this has been either due to the fact that the authority lies with the state legislature (e.g. same day voter registration) or that elections officials across the state have expressed concerns about the logistics of the proposed change. It doesn't help Zakim's case that he comes across as arrogant and ill-informed (because he is arrogant and ill-informed).

Representative in Congress, 5th District: Katherine Clark - Though I don't usually vote in uncontested races, I actually do like Katherine Clark personally.

Representative in Congress - 7th District: Mike Capuano - This is NOT my district and I can't vote in this race, but if I could I would be voting for Mike Capuano, and I hope others will vote for him. Mike is one of the more straight-talking political people I've met over the years who shows an uncommon level of pragmatism. On that front, one of the single most pragmatic things a voter in this district can do is to reelect someone who will likely play a lead role on the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure in the next Congress. Federal funding for transportation and infrastructure projects in Massachusetts is incredibly important - especially now. I have nothing personally against Ayanna Pressley and I certainly believe that representation should be proportional, but that same argument could just as easily be used to question why the Massachusetts congressional delegation is 9-0 Democrat even though the percentage of registered Democrats in Massachusetts is just 33.2% (with 55.1% unenrolled, 10.4% Republican, 0.3% Libertarian, and 1.0% other political designations).

State Senate, Middlesex & Suffolk District: Sal DiDomenico - Again, I don't generally vote in uncontested races, but I do like Sal DiDomencio personally and I appreciate the role that Sal's family has played in the social life of East Cambridge (even though Sal now lives in Everett).

State Representative, Twenty-Sixth Middlesex District - This is my House district and I will either leave it blank or write in the name of my favorite beer. There is an incumbent (Mike Connolly) but he doesn't represent my interests. I wish we had a choice in candidates and it's a real shame that we do not.

State Representative, Twenty-Fifth Middlesex District: Marjorie Decker - This is NOT my district and I can't vote in this race, but if I could I would be voting for Marjorie Decker. She technically has a challenger, but there is a zero percent chance that Rep. Decker will lose her seat. I really wish the district boundaries were different because I would gladly vote for Marjorie who has fought the good fight on many fronts in the state legislature. I actually view her as my state representative even though I don't live in her district.

Other State Senate and State Representative seats are uncontested and occupied by good people. I'll just leave it at that.

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County: Michael Sullivan - Again, this seat may be uncontested but Michael and I have been friends for a quarter-century and I have a lot of respect for him.

District Attorney, Northern District: Marian Ryan - Though I don't closely follow the goings-on of the District Attorney's Office, Marian Ryan has consistently come across as a straight-shooting and very competent DA - even when some of the cases were controversial. There are some elected positions that paradoxically should not be overly political and the DA is definitely one of those positions. She has been quite "progressive" in her role balancing the need to prosecute aggressively when appropriate and to administer justice with compassion and fairness. Marian Ryan was born in Cambridge and raised in Somerville. I have nothing negative to say about the other candidate, Donna Patalano, but I'll have to stick with the very qualified incumbent on this one.

Now..... feel free to vote as I do, or ignore me completely, but please do learn about all the candidates and vote in the Primary on Tuesday. - Robert Winters


It's Party Time! - Number of registered Cambridge voters by party or political designation (at Aug 15, 2018 registration deadline)

Party Code number
Democratic Party D 37904 (56.0%)
Unenrolled U 26660 (39.4%)
Republican Party R 2363 (3.5%)
United Independent Party CC 239 (0.4%)
Libertarian Party L 167 (0.2%)
Green-Rainbow Party J 156 (0.2%)
Socialist S 39 (0.1%)
Interdependent 3rd Party T 29
Pizza Party AA 19
Green Party USA G 18
American Independent Party Q 16
Conservative Party A 15
Pirate X 14
Massachusetts Independent Party O 10
Constitution Party K 6
We The People H 5
Working Families Z 5
World Citizens Party Y 2
American Term Limits BB 1
Prohibition Party P 1
TOTAL   67669

Of these 67,669 registered voters, 4,923 of them registered in 2018 – 2606 Democrat (52.9%), 164 Republican (3.3%), and 2099 Unenrolled (42.6%).

There are now only 121 registered Cambridge voters who have voted in every citywide election since 1997.


Deadline to Register to Vote and Availability of Absentee Ballots for the State Primary, September 4, 2018

The State Primary will be held on Tuesday, September 4, 2018. For Cambridge residents not already registered, the last day to register to vote is Wednesday, August 15, 2018 until 8:00pm. The Office of the Secretary of State has developed an Online Voter Registration System at www.registertovotema.com. Individuals may use the online system to submit an online application, update their address or change their party affiliation. You must have a valid driver's license, learner's permit, or non-driver ID issued by the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV). If you do not have an RMV ID you can use the system to create an application. Print and sign the completed form and mail or bring it to the office of the Cambridge Election Commission.

Absentee Ballots are now available at the Cambridge Election Commission office. Any voter who is unable to go to the polls on Election Day due to physical disability, religious belief, or absence from the City may request an Absentee Ballot from the Commission. The deadline to apply for an Absentee Ballot is Friday, August 31st at 5:00pm. Absentee Ballots may be mailed to voters, or such voters may choose to vote at the Commission office during regular city office hours: Monday, 8:30am-8:00pm; Tuesday-Thursday, 8:30am-5:00pm; Friday, 8:30am-Noon. The office will be open for extended hours on the following dates:
Last Day to Register to Vote for the State Primary - Wednesday, August 15, 2018 from 8:30am-8pm.
Last Day to Apply for an Absentee Ballot Friday, August 31, 2018 from 8:30am-5pm.

The polls will be open on Election Day, September 4th from 7:00am until 8:00pm. For any additional information, please visit the Cambridge Election Commission office at 51 Inman Street, call (617-349-4361) or visit the Election Commission website at www.cambridgema.gov/election.


Cambridge Human Services Commission Vacancies

City SealAug 8, 2018 – City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking Cambridge residents interested in volunteering to serve on the nine-member Human Services Commission. The Commission advises the City Manager and the Assistant City Manager for Human Services on human services policy issues, needs assessment, and funding allocations.

With the Department of Human Service Programs, the Commission also promotes activities that enhance the quality of life for Cambridge residents. Over the years, the Commission has responded to local needs by recommending Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding for a wide range of programs offered by the city and community agencies.

The Commission usually meets with the Assistant City Manager for Human Services on the second Thursday of each month from 5:30 to 7:30 pm. For more information, contact Mike Payack at 617-349-6208 or mpayack@cambridgema.gov. Commission members serve without compensation.

Applications to serve on this committee can be submitted to City Manager Louis A. DePasquale using the City’s online application system at www.cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and resume or applicable experience may be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, September 7, 2018.


Members Sought for Mayor’s Arts Task Force

City SealAug 6, 2018 – Mayor Marc McGovern is seeking Cambridge residents interested in serving on the newly formed Mayor’s Arts Task Force. The Mayor’s Arts Task Force, Chaired by City Councillor Alanna Mallon, will be charged with the responsibility of producing a set of action-oriented policy recommendations that will promote diversity and investment in the arts, as well as support the Central Square Arts and Cultural District.

The Mayor’s Arts Task Force will be comprised of city staff, local community leaders, and members of the artist community. Candidates will provide guidance on:

The Mayor’s Arts Task Force will meet monthly on a Thursday, from September 2018 through June 2019, from 5:30pm to 7:30pm in City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA.

Applicants should email a letter of interest that addresses their qualifications to Afiyah Harrigan at aharrigan@cambridgema.gov. Letters of interest can also be dropped off to Afiyah Harrigan in the Mayor’s Office, 2nd Floor, Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. The deadline for submitting letters of interests is August 31, 2018.


City of Cambridge to Celebrate Bluebikes Expansion with Pop Up Events
Enjoy Treats, Giveaways and a Raffle on Thurs, Sept 6 and Fri, Sept 7

BlueBikes - 699 Mt. Auburn St.Aug 28, 2018 – On Thursday, Sept. 6 and Friday, Sept. 7, the City of Cambridge will host celebratory events to mark Bluebikes’ arrival into new neighborhoods. All community members are invited to attend the free events, which will include refreshments from local businesses, prize giveaways, a raffle for a free annual Bluebikes membership, and information about Bluebikes’ Income-Eligible Program.

The pop-up events will be held at two of Cambridge’s newest Bluebikes stations:

In addition to these locations, new Bluebikes stations were recently installed at Rogers St. at Land Blvd. and Massachusetts Ave. at Hadley St. / Walden St., with additional stations expected to be deployed in Cambridge this fall. This is part of Boston, Brookline Cambridge, and Somerville’s joint effort to expand options for sustainable transportation by increasing access to Bluebikes throughout the communities.

Event attendees will receive a Bluebikes Passport Card. Those who attend at least one event at each of the four municipalities and get their Passport Card stamped will receive $15 off their new or next annual membership, as well as a limited-edition T-shirt. For a full list of pop-up events in each municipality, visit https://www.bluebikes.com/blog/expansionevents.

About Bluebikes – Bluebikes is public transportation by bike. Owned and jointly governed by the municipalities of Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville, Bluebikes offers a fast, fun, and affordable transportation option. Today, users can ride any of the 1,800+ bikes to and from the 200+ stations across the region. By the end of 2019, the municipalities will provide 3,000 bikes and 300 stations for their residents, workers, and visitors. Since launching in 2011, more than 7 million trips have been taken on Bluebikes, including nearly 900,000 trips so far in 2018. For more information, visit https://www.bluebikes.com/.


Tuesday, September 4, 2018 Primary - List of Offices & Candidates (Cambridge)

If you are registered with any political party, you may only vote in that party's primary. Unenrolled voters may choose to vote in any party primary. Choosing to vote in a particular party's primary does NOT enroll you as a member of that party.

[Check your voter registration status]     [Where do I vote?]

Democratic Primary Republican Primary Libertarian Primary
SENATOR IN CONGRESS
ELIZABETH A. WARREN, 24 Linnaean St., Cambridge GEOFF DIEHL, 10 Village Way, Whitman
JOHN KINGSTON, 16 Chestnut St., Winchester
BETH JOYCE LINDSTROM, 161 Wharton Row, Groton
NO NOMINATION
GOVERNOR
JAY M. GONZALEZ, 62 Putnam St., Needham
BOB MASSIE, 140 Sycamore St., Somerville
CHARLES D. BAKER, 49 Monument Ave., Swampscott
SCOTT D. LIVELY, 453 State St., Springfield
NO NOMINATION
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
QUENTIN PALFREY, 683 Boston Post Rd., Weston
JIMMY TINGLE, 27 Lawrence St., Cambridge
KARYN E. POLITO, 2 Tatassit Cir., Shrewsbury NO NOMINATION
ATTORNEY GENERAL
MAURA HEALEY, 40 Winthrop St., Boston JAMES R. McMAHON, III, 14 Canal View Rd., Bourne
DANIEL L. SHORES, 2706 Hockley Dr., Hingham
NO NOMINATION
SECRETARY OF STATE
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, 46 Lake St., Boston
JOSH ZAKIM, 177 Commonwealth Ave., Boston
ANTHONY M. AMORE, 182 Norfolk Ave., Swampscott NO NOMINATION
TREASURER
DEBORAH B. GOLDBERG, 37 Hyslop Rd., Brookline KEIKO M. ORRALL, 120 Crooked Ln., Lakeville NO NOMINATION
AUDITOR
SUZANNE M. BUMP, 6 Hoe Shop St., Easton HELEN BRADY, 1630 Monument St., Concord DANIEL FISHMAN,
36 Colgate Rd., Beverly
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS - FIFTH DISTRICT (Wards 3-2A, 4-2, 4-3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10-1, 10-2) - MAP
KATHERINE M. CLARK, 64 Prospect St., Melrose JOHN HUGO, 20 Walnut St., Woburn
LOUIS KUCHNIR, 15 Foxhill Dr., Southborough
NO NOMINATION
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS - SEVENTH DISTRICT (Wards 1, 2, 3-1, 3-2, 3-3, 4-1, 5, 10-3, 11) - MAP
MICHAEL E. CAPUANO, 172 Central St., Somerville
AYANNA S. PRESSLEY, 1910 Dorchester Ave., Boston
NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
COUNCILLOR (Governor's Council) - SIXTH DISTRICT
TERRENCE W. KENNEDY, 3 Stafford Rd., Lynnfield NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Senate - SECOND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (Wards 9, 10, 11) - MAP
PATRICIA D. JEHLEN, 67 Dane St., Somerville NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Senate - MIDDLESEX & SUFFOLK DISTRICT (Wards 1, 2-1, 3, 4-2, 6, 7, 8) - MAP
SAL N. DiDOMENICO, 125 Clarence St., Everett NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Senate - FIRST SUFFOLK & MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (Wards 2-2, 2-3, 4-1, 4-3, 5) - MAP
JOSEPH A. BONCORE, 39 Sagamore Ave., Winthrop NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Representative - TWENTY-FOURTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (Ward 11-1, 11-3) - MAP
DAVID M. ROGERS, 18 Richard Ave., Cambridge NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Representative - TWENTY-FIFTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (Wards 4, 6-2, 6-3, 7, 8, 10-1, 10-2) - MAP
MARJORIE C. DECKER, 29 Raymond St., Cambridge
LESLEY REBECCA PHILLIPS, 1643 Cambridge St., Cambridge
NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Representative - TWENTY-SIXTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (Wards 1, 2-1, 3, 6-1) - MAP
MIKE CONNOLLY, 4 Ashburton Pl., Cambridge NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Representative - TWENTY-NINTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (Wards 9, 10-3, 11-2) - MAP
JONATHAN HECHT, 159 Russell Ave., Watertown NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
State Representative - EIGHTH SUFFOLK DISTRICT (Wards 2-2, 2-3, 5) - MAP
JAY D. LIVINGSTONE, 311 Commonwealth Ave., Boston NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
CLERK OF COURTS - MIDDLESEX COUNTY
MICHAEL A. SULLIVAN, 42 Huron Ave., Cambridge NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
REGISTER OF DEEDS - MIDDLESEX SOUTHERN DISTRICT
MARIA C. CURTATONE, 37 Munroe St., Somerville NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION
DISTRICT ATTORNEY - NORTHERN DISTRICT
MARIAN T. RYAN, 8 Bradford Rd., Belmont
DONNA PATALANO, 12 Norwood St., Winchester
NO NOMINATION NO NOMINATION

New ImageCast Voting System for the City of Cambridge

The City of Cambridge is thrilled to announce the launch of the newly acquired ImageCast Vote Tabulators which will be utilized for the first time for the upcoming State Primary, Tuesday, September 4, 2018. We wanted to give our voters a brief introduction to the new equipment to provide a glimpse of what to expect on Election Day. While the design of the new tabulator is similar to the AccuVote system used in past elections, there are some new features which improve its usability. The new design makes it easier to navigate and is more user-friendly. Election workers at each polling location have been trained to assist the voter, if needed, during their introduction to the new equipment. One of the new features of the ImageCast Vote Tabulator is that the voter will be able to see if their ballot has been cast successfully or if a ballot error has been detected. If an error is detected, the voter will be provided with the option of having the ballot returned to them to make the correction or to cast the ballot without correction. After an option has been selected by the voter they will then proceed with casting their ballot. Voters are advised to watch the LCD screen on the tabulator to confirm that their ballot has been successfully cast.

ImageCast ImageCast

PLEASE DON’T FORGET TO VOTE!


Temporary Locations for the State Primary, September 4 & New Polling Location

1) Due to renovations, those who vote in Ward 3 Precinct 3, Salvation Army Headquarters, 402 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge will vote next door at the Lafayette Square Fire Station, 378 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge (Entrance on Sidney Street) for the 2018 State Primary. The Cambridge Board of Election Commissioners approved the temporary relocation of the polling precinct for Ward 3 Precinct 3 at a meeting held on Wednesday, June 1, 2018.

2) Those who vote in Ward 9 Precinct 3, Haggerty School, 110 Cushing Street, Gym, Lawn Street Entrance, Cambridge will no longer vote at this location. The new voting location will be Corcoran Park Community Building, 1 Corcoran Lane, Cambridge. The Cambridge Board of Election Commissioners approved the relocation of the polling precinct for Ward 9 Precinct 3 at a meeting held on Wednesday, March 14, 2018.

3) Due to renovations, those who vote in Ward 10 Precinct 1, Russell Apartments, 2050 Mass. Ave., Cambridge will vote at the Peabody School Gym, 70-R Rindge Ave., Cambridge (Entrance in rear of building). The Cambridge Board of Election Commissioners approved the temporary relocation of the polling precinct for Ward 10 Precinct 1 at a meeting held on Wednesday, April 18, 2018.

Cambridge Polling Locations for 2018 State Primary Election


Aretha Franklin, the ‘Queen of Soul,’ Dies at 76 (Aug 16, 2018 - NY Times)

Everything else seems of lesser importance today.

Frances Deguglielmo Tingle

Also, this very sad note from our great friend, Jimmy Tingle: "On Aug 15 the Tingles lost their matriarch and longtime inspirational leader with the passing of Frances Tingle. We will suspend most campaign activities until after services are complete on Mon, Aug 20. We very grateful for everyones well wishes and support in this difficult time." Mrs. Tingle was 90 and a longtime neighbor on Broadway in Cambridge. - RW

TINGLE, Frances DeGuglielmo Age 90, of Cambridge, passed away peacefully on August 15, 2018 after a long illness in her home surrounded by her loving family. Frances is survived by her four loving children, James Tingle, Jr. and his wife, Catherine, Garrett Tingle and his wife Janice, Ruth Crowley and her husband Peter, Robert Tingle and his wife Margaret of Arlington. She was preceded in death by her husband of 39 years James "Cotton" Tingle of Arapahoe, NC and 9 brothers and sisters, the Honorable Joseph DeGuglielmo, Very Rev. Antonine DeGuglielmo, OFM, Mary Frisoli, Robert DeGuglielmo, Lillian Ferraro, Austin, Walter, Lawrence and Joan DeGuglielmo. Known as "Mama Tingle" she leaves behind 7 grandchildren; Garrett, Alyssa, Michela, Aidan, Joseph, Jennifer, Seamus and 3 great-grandchildren, Brooklyn-Rose, Austin, Jaxton and many loving nieces and nephews. Frances Tingle was born in Cambridge to parents Austin and Mary DeGuglielmo. She graduated from Emmanuel College with a degree in social work. After raising four children she returned to the workforce at Bioran Medical Laboratory, where she worked for more that 15 years rising to the level of Billing Supervisor. Frances was a passionate volunteer in her church and community and known for her generosity. She enjoyed playing scrabble, bridge and writing her memoirs. Her family and friends will remember her as a devoted mother and friend who opened her door to everyone. "Frannie" was witty, feisty and fun-loving and we will miss her dearly. Funeral from the Donovan-Aufiero Funeral Home, 140 Otis St., CAMBRIDGE, Monday at 10 AM followed by a Rite of Christian Burial in St. Francis Church, 325 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Monday at 11 AM. Visiting Sunday 4-8 PM. For guest book visit http://donovanaufierofuneralhome.com/.


**SAVE THE DATE**
Saturday August 18: DPW and Cambridge Public Library will be hosting a Fix-It Clinic at the Main Branch of CPL, 449 Broadway. Save broken items and clothes and get them fixed.


Cambridge Conservation Commission Members Sought

City SealJuly 24, 2018 – City Manager Louis A. DePasquale is seeking two Cambridge residents to fill vacancies on the Cambridge Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for administration of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (WPA), a state law governing activities in and immediately adjacent to local wetlands, waterways, and floodplains.

The Commission holds two regularly scheduled public meetings each month to review permit applications under the WPA, issue permits, and conduct other business related to the management of Cambridge’s natural resource areas.

The Conservation Commission consists of seven members appointed by the City Manager to serve three-year terms. Cambridge residents with expertise in landscape architecture, civil/environmental engineering, hydrology, ecology, or law are encouraged to apply.

Applications to serve on this committee can be submitted to City Manager Louis A. DePasquale using the City’s online application system at www.cambridgema.gov/apply. A cover letter and resume or applicable experience may be submitted during the online application process. Paper applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, September 7, 2018.


Availability of Absentee Ballots for the State Primary, September 4, 2018

The State Primary will be held on Tuesday, September 4, 2018. Absentee Ballots are now available at the Cambridge Election Commission office. Any voter who is unable to go to the polls on Election Day due to physical disability, religious belief, or absence from the City may request an Absentee Ballot from the Commission. The deadline to apply for an Absentee Ballot is Friday, August 31st at 5:00pm. Absentee Ballots may be mailed to voters, or such voters may choose to vote at the Commission office during regular city office hours: Monday, 8:30am-8:00pm; Tuesday-Thursday, 8:30am-5:00pm; Friday, 8:30am-Noon. Last Day to Apply for an Absentee Ballot Friday, August 31, 2018 from 8:30am-5pm.

The polls will be open on Election Day, September 4th from 7:00am until 8:00pm. For any additional information, please visit the Cambridge Election Commission office at 51 Inman Street, call (617-349-4361) or visit the Election Commission website at www.cambridgema.gov/election.


Temporary Locations for the State Primary, September 4 & New Polling Location

1) Due to renovations, those who vote in Ward 3 Precinct 3, Salvation Army Headquarters, 402 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge will vote next door at the Lafayette Square Fire Station, 378 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge (Entrance on Sidney Street) for the 2018 State Primary. The Cambridge Board of Election Commissioners approved the temporary relocation of the polling precinct for Ward 3 Precinct 3 at a meeting held on Wednesday, June 1, 2018.

2) Those who vote in Ward 9 Precinct 3, Haggerty School, 110 Cushing Street, Gym, Lawn Street Entrance, Cambridge will no longer vote at this location. The new voting location will be Corcoran Park Community Building, 1 Corcoran Lane, Cambridge. The Cambridge Board of Election Commissioners approved the relocation of the polling precinct for Ward 9 Precinct 3 at a meeting held on Wednesday, March 14, 2018.

3) Due to renovations, those who vote in Ward 10 Precinct 1, Russell Apartments, 2050 Mass. Ave., Cambridge will vote at the Peabody School Gym, 70-R Rindge Ave., Cambridge (Entrance in rear of building). The Cambridge Board of Election Commissioners approved the temporary relocation of the polling precinct for Ward 10 Precinct 1 at a meeting held on Wednesday, April 18, 2018.

Cambridge Polling Locations for 2018 State Primary Election


Saturday Morning Coffee Thoughts

July 7 – Summertime in Cambridge can be, at least for some of us, far less political than the rest of the year. The City Council is on hiatus (well, I suppose the business of sucking up to potential voters never really ends), party conventions have come and gone, and the fall elections (both primary and general) are a couple of months away. My focus of late is more on Linear Algebra and electrical upgrades than on contemplating whether or not a few trees will impact climate change or whether Traffic Czar Joe Barr will be successful in his quest to make all driving in Cambridge unbearable.

I found the latest poll for the Massachusetts Democratic Primary for Governor (June 30, WBUR/MassINC) to be particularly interesting. Apparently Jay Gonzalez has 21% support to Bob Massie's 15% support in a two-man race. That's a total of 36% support, so apparently 64% of Democrats don't actually give a damn about either of these two guys or, more likely, they never heard of them. Actually, the poll really did ask that question and 61% of voters never heard of Gonzalez and 55% never heard of Massie. This compares to the 2% of voters who never heard of Charlie Baker and the 68% of voters who have a favorable view of him.

That same poll indicates that Secretary of State Bill Galvin has 44% favorable and 9% unfavorable ratings. His primary competitor Josh Zakim has a 14% favorable rating, and 62% of voters never heard of him (even though I suppose most of them know of the bridge named for his dad). If they were voting today it would be 49% Galvin over Zakim's 18% with the rest not giving a damn either way.

It's unfortunate that in the general election each party's Governor and Lt. Governor candidates have to run together. I hope Jimmy Tingle gets the Democratic nod over Quentin Palfrey for Lt. Governor but, alas, the Baker/Tingle ticket is off the table.

A well-meaning political blogger recently asked me about the various interesting local legislative races in Cambridge, i.e. the Mass. House and Senate races. All I could tell her was that listening for crickets would be far more rewarding. Virtually all of the incumbents are running unopposed. The only exception is Marjorie Decker's 25th Middlesex district in which she's opposed by a perennial loser. In my district (26th Middlesex) I will likely write in the name of my favorite beverage rather than the incumbent. How did we get to the point where our choices are so abysmally limited? Sometimes I think we would do better if we chose our legislators the same way jurors are selected - at random from street listings.

I read on Boston.com the other day that the organizers of the Women’s March event in January on the Cambridge Common this past January received a bill for some of the police details and emergency medical technician services after the event, and that the ACLU is suing the City as a result. They have a good case, I suppose, but it makes me wonder why the Cambridge Carnival organizers have not been billed even though there have been actual shootings at their events.

I was a bit startled to learn at the recent hearings on the Nakagawa-Brown Zoning Petition (also marketed as the "Climate Safety Petition" or the "Flood & Heat Resilient Cambridge Petition") that my house was shown on a narrow future waterway separating the rest of Mid-Cambridge and an island extending into The Port neighborhood. What's curious about this is that even when you adjust the 1 to 10 dial in the Surging Seas tool to the maximum, you'd have to go to at least 11 to make this happen. Alas, nothing like a little fear to assist in your political organizing. By the way, the Planning Board voted 6-1 against this petition and the City Council did not seem at all pleased when informed that the petition would kill the funding for necessary renovations to the Miller's River Apartments in East Cambridge. In any case, I still have to decide if I should start stocking up on sandbags or just buy a boat for commuting to work. Maybe we can just excavate the streets and turn Cambridge into Venice. Then we can argue for Inclusionary Gondolas. - RW


Public Open House: Boston Properties Infill Development Concept Plan Phase 2 / 325 Main Street Development Proposal

Wednesday, August 1, 2018
80 Broadway, Cambridge MA (basement under Meadhall)
Doors open at 5:30pm
Presentation will begin at 6:15pm

There will be food, a scale neighborhood model, stations based on topic area with experts in that topic from the design team to answer questions, and CoUrbanize will be recording public feedback along the way.

Follow the project on Boston Properties CoUrbanize website: https://courbanize.com/projects/kendallsquared/updates

For more detailed information on the project you can click here and here to download two PDFs.

Kendall Kendall


Cambridge’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. School Project Achieves LEED® Platinum Certification
Building Design Embodies Net Zero Ideals

July 30, 2018 – The City of Cambridge is proud to announce that the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Lower School and Putnam Avenue Upper School Project has earned LEED® Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. This is highest rating attainable in this category, based on Version 2009 for schools. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)* provides third-party verification that a building was designed and built using strategies aimed at improving environmental performance.

The 170,000 square foot complex located at 100-102 Putnam Avenue opened in December 2015 as the first near net zero school building in Cambridge. It houses the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Lower School, the Putnam Avenue Upper School, and the Department of Human Service Programs’ Preschool, After-School, and Community School programs.

Projects pursuing LEED certification earn points across several categories, including energy use and air quality. With a score of 89, the MLK Jr. school building is the second highest scoring new LEED for Schools project in the nation (just behind Dunbar Senior High School in Washington DC, also designed by Perkins Eastman).

Designed by Perkins Eastman and constructed by Rich-Caulfield MLK Venture, the building embodies Net Zero ideals and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) in action. Throughout the building are embedded opportunities for students to explore the arts, sustainability, and engineering concepts, including math-themed interactive artwork and interpretive displays with signage illuminating the facility’s use of insulation and sustainable materials, consideration of natural light, and reliance on systems for solar energy collection, geothermal heating, and grey water reclamation. PhotoVoltaic panels help generate over 40% of the building’s electrical needs; geothermal wells reduce heating and cooling loads, and an underground storage tank collects rainwater that is used for non-potable water. The building is designed to use 60% less energy than typical educational buildings in New England and is a literal teaching tool with cutouts in the corridors that show the mechanical system at work. This enables students to understand how the energy they use, and save, manifests. Signage is placed throughout the schools explaining these processes.

“We were extremely proud to have built a high-quality sustainable facility that serves the children of Cambridge and enhances the neighborhood,” said Cambridge City Manager Louis A. DePasquale. “This project and prestigious recognition were the result of an incredible collaboration between the City, Cambridge Public Schools, the architect, the contractor, and the leadership of Deputy City Manager Lisa Peterson and the Cambridge City Council.

For more information on the LEED certification process and green buildings in Cambridge, visit http://www.cambridgema.gov/CDD/zoninganddevelopment/sustainablebldgs.

About LEED: *LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) provides third-party verification that a building or community was designed and built using strategies aimed at improving environmental performance, including energy savings, water efficiency, CO2 emissions reduction, improved indoor environmental quality, and stewardship of resources and sensitivity to their impacts. The LEED program was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council. LEED provides building owners and operators a concise framework for identifying and implementing practical and measurable green building design, construction, operations and maintenance solutions.

City of Cambridge Municipal Buildings with LEED certifications:
Cambridge City Hall Annex, 344 Broadway (Gold 2005)
Russell Field House, 82 Clifton St. (Certified 2008)
Robert W. Healy Public Safety Facility, 125 Sixth St. (Silver 2010)
War Memorial Building Renovation, 1640 Cambridge St. (Silver 2010)
Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway (Silver 2010)
West Cambridge Youth & Community Center, 688 Huron Ave. (Silver 2011)
Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, 459 Broadway (Gold 2013)
Alice K. Wolf Center, 5 Western Ave. (Gold 2015)

MLK School Classroom
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Lower School and Putnam Avenue Upper School Project Classroom
Photo by Robert Benson, Courtesy Perkins Eastman


Sun, July 22 - Still laying low while all the electrical work and other renovations are completed on the homefront. We're under siege! I hope to be back writing about civic stuff very soon. - RW