Cambridge City Council meeting - Nov 19, 2018 - AGENDA

CITY MANAGER’S AGENDA
1. Transmitting Communication from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to the transfer of $10,000 from the General Fund Employee Benefits Salary and Wages account (Insurance) to the General Fund Electrical Travel and Training account (Judgments and Damages) to cover medical services and/or prescription reimbursement costs for personnel injured in performance of their duties.
Order Adopted 9-0

2. Transmitting Communication from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to the transfer of $35,000 from the General Fund Employee Benefits (Insurance) Salary and Wages account to the General Fund Library Travel and Training (Judgment and Damages) account to cover current and anticipated medical services and/or prescription reimbursement costs for the remainder of the fiscal year for Library personnel injured in the performance of their duties.
Order Adopted 9-0

3. Transmitting Communication from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of $28,579 from the Edward J. Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant through the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance to the Grant Fund Police Department Other Ordinary Maintenance account which will support the purchase of computer equipment in new police cruisers.
Order Adopted 9-0

4. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-62, regarding a report on replacing open trash receptacles with Big Belly Solar Trash cans, with an emphasis on the business districts.
Placed on File

5. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-90, regarding the possibility of installing a crosswalk at across Western Avenue at Soden Street.
Referred Back to City Manager - Simmons

6. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-102, regarding the potential for utilizing an Icelandic crosswalk design in East Cambridge.
Placed on File

TO: Louis DePasquale, City Manager
FROM: Iram Farooq, Assistant City Manager for Community Development; Joseph Barr, Director of Traffic, Parking and Transportation
SUBJECT: Awaiting Report #18-102 dated 10/1/18, regarding the potential of utilizing an Icelandic crosswalk design in East Cambridge
DATE: November 9, 2018

With respect to the above-referenced Awaiting Report, we submit the following.

Three-dimensional, or optical-illusion street markings have been the subject of experimentation for several years; the crosswalk in Iceland is an example of a recent one that received media attention. In this instance, a 3D pedestrian crossing was painted with the intent to slow traffic on a narrow street.

City staff have investigated the research and experience to date with these kinds of experimental markings. The analyses have concluded that the markings do not achieve the intended effects, and can also cause safety problems when implemented.

In one formal study, between 10-14% of drivers swerved upon seeing the markings, perhaps believing them to be real raised objects in the roadway. Swerving would not be a safe maneuver for either the driver or other users on the road. Even a low-speed swerve can cause a serious crash. In another study, the addition of the three-dimensional markings did not produce significantly more yielding to pedestrians compared with regular crosswalk markings. In various studies, there was also no clear evidence that vehicle speeds were reduced. In addition, concerns have been raised about the perspective of these devices for pedestrians with impaired vision, since they may have difficulty assessing the markings when attempting to cross the street.

Installing similar devices in Cambridge is not recommended, as they have not been shown to be effective at safely affecting motorist behavior nor have they measurably improved the ability for people to cross the street.

We continue to work throughout the city, including in East Cambridge, to ensure that all crosswalk markings are clear and visible. The international style crosswalks that are our standard (sometimes called “zebra” or “ladder” crosswalks) are consistent with national best practices. The crosswalks have been shown to be most effective in terms of visibility for both motorists and pedestrians.

With respect to concerns about speed and safety, we continue to implement a range of strategies through existing programs dedicated to these efforts. To achieve maximum impact, our traffic calming designs are generally implemented in conjunction with street reconstruction efforts. Projects on Spring Street, Thorndike Street, and Fulkerson Street included traffic calming elements such as raised crossings and curb extensions, and Sixth Street, which is undergoing reconstruction, also will have those elements. The East Cambridge neighborhood will be evaluated as part of the Council’s request that we consider 20 mph speed limit zones throughout the City, which we expect to report back to the Council about by early 2019. Through our Vision Zero policy and planning, we will continue to examine opportunities for focused action.

7. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-10, regarding creating a list of private meeting and conference rooms that are available to the public through development mitigation.
Placed on File

8. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-98, regarding outreach related to Cambridge Community Electricity 100% Green Program during Energy Awareness Month.
Placed on File

9. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-78, regarding upgrades to the Paul Dudley White Community Path and Magazine Beach renovations.
Placed on File

10. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-85, regarding a report on the feasibility of appointing an advisory committee to work through resilience elements raised during the Envision process and through the Brown Petition.
Referred to Unfinished Business - McGovern

Nov 19, 2018
To the Honorable, the City Council:

In response to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-85, regarding a report on the feasibility of appointing an advisory committee to work through resilience elements raised during the Envision process and through the Brown Petition, I have appointed a Climate Resilience Zoning Task Force representing a variety of community stakeholders and perspectives as noted in the above-mentioned policy order.

This task force is being created to build upon the City’s 2017 Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment (CCVA) and ongoing Climate Change Preparedness and Resilience (CCPR) planning efforts and to advise me on development standards that can be incorporated into the Zoning Ordinance that would result in new development that is more resilient to climate change risks. Specifically, this group will focus on zoning recommendations that address the climate change impacts identified in the CCVA:

• Anticipated flooding due to sea level rise, storm surge, and precipitation.

• Anticipated rise in temperatures exacerbated by the urban heat island effect.

This work will be citywide in scope but may result in different requirements for different parts of the city based on geographic differences in vulnerability to climate change impacts.

The task force is expected to begin work in January 2019 and will meet approximately monthly over the course of a year. The task force will work collaboratively with City staff and consultants. Jeff Roberts, CDD’s Director of Zoning & Development will be the project manager. The following individuals have been appointed to the task force.

City Councillors/Council Representative
1. Dennis Carlone -- City Councillor
2. Sumbul Siddiqui -- City Councillor
3. Denise Simmons -- City Councillor
4. Quinton Zondervan - City Councillor
5. Wil Durbin -- Mayor’s Chief of Staff

Residents
6. Doug Brown (Co Chair) - West Cambridge
7. Conrad Crawford - East Cambridge
8. Ted Cohen - North Cambridge/Planning Board
9. Mike Nakagawa - North Cambridge

Union/Trades Rep
10. Louis Bacci Jr - Laborers Local 151/East Cambridge/Planning Board

Institutional/Non-Profit Representatives
11. Brian Goldberg - MIT Office of Sustainability
12. Tom Lucey - Harvard University
13. Margaret Moran - Cambridge Housing Authority
14. Mike Owu – MITIMCo
15. Deborah Ruhe - Just-a-Start

Business Representatives/Property Owners
16. Jason Alves - East Cambridge Business Assoc.
17. Nancy Donahue - Cambridge Chamber of Commerce
18. Joe Maguire – Alexandria
19. Tom Sullivan - Divco West

Subject Matter Experts
20. Tom Chase - Energy & Resilience Consultant, New Ecology
21. Lauren Miller - Climate Consultant, CDM Smith
22. Jim Newman - Resilience Consultant, Linnaean Solutions

City Staff
23. John Bolduc - Environmental Planner
24. Iram Farooq (Co-Chair) - Assistant City Manager for Community Development
25. Kathy Watkins - City Engineer/Assistant Commissioner

Very truly yours, Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager

11. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to proposed revisions to the draft Surveillance Ordinance.
Passed to 2nd Reading as Amended 7-2 (Kelley, Toomey - NO)

November 19, 2018
To the Honorable, the City Council:

Pursuant to Council Orders issued on 9/17/18 following the 8/13/18 Ordinance Committee Meeting, City staff have made the below-referenced proposed revisions to the draft Surveillance Ordinance following the 8/13/18 Ordinance Committee hearing.

These proposed revisions to the draft Ordinance were made with the view in mind of considering all of the suggestions/proposed revisions from Mayor McGovern, Councilor Kelley, other members of the City Council, and comments submitted by the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts (the “ACLU”) and members of the public. After giving careful consideration to all of the proposed revisions, City staff recommend making additional proposed changes to the draft Ordinance are as follows:

1. In order to accomplish gender neutrality, references to his/her and other such gender specific pronouns throughout the draft Ordinance have been removed and replaced with the name of the Office/Officer (i.e., City Manager, Police Commissioner, etc.), rather than a pronoun.

2. The definitions section (Section 2.128.020) has been streamlined by removing lists of requirements, i.e., Annual Surveillance Report, Surveillance Technology Impact Report, Surveillance Use Policy, and Technology-Specific Surveillance Use Policy, and including those requirements in the respective sections of the draft Ordinance governing submission of such reports to the City Council, i.e., Sections 2.128.030(C) and (D), 2.128.050(B), and 2.128.060(B).

3. The exceptions and exemptions previously included within the definition of Surveillance Technology in Section 2.128.020(B) of the draft Ordinance have been moved to Section 2.128.070, which relates only to exceptions and exemptions.

4. In order to limit the use of Surveillance Technology in Exigent Circumstances by the Police Department, Section 2.178.040 has been revised to read “for a period not to exceed 90 days.” This means that for each time the Police Commissioner seeks to use Surveillance Technology in Exigent Circumstances, the use cannot exceed 90 days without getting Council approval. Section 2.128.030 (A) has also been revised to make clear that only the Police Department may use Surveillance Technology in Exigent Circumstances.

5. The sentence “To the extent the City Manager determines that approving or disapproving the Surveillance Use Policy would unlawfully obstruct the investigative or prosecutorial functions of the Police Department, the City Council shall simply receive and discuss the applicable portions of the Surveillance Use Policy” has been deleted from Section 2.128.050(C) as requested.

6. The phrase “Cameras installed in or on a police vehicle” has been removed from the exemptions outlined in Section 2.128.070(3). As a result, the Police Commissioner will have to submit a request for approval in the event the Police Commissioner determines that cameras should be installed in or on police vehicles.

7. The requirement to file a notice with the City Clerk in advance of seeking injunctive relief in court has been removed from Section 2.128.080(B). This means that a person seeking relief for an alleged violation of the Surveillance Ordinance can go directly to court to file an action for injunctive relief.

8. Section 2.128.080(C) has been revised to incorporate by reference the whistleblower protections afforded to Massachusetts public employees under G. L. c. 149, § 185 (the “Massachusetts Whistleblower Act”) in order to address the request to have whistleblower protections in the draft Ordinance.

I am very pleased to submit the enclosed draft Ordinance to the City Council. The draft Ordinance before you is the culmination of diligent work over the past several years by the City Council, City staff, representatives of the ACLU and members of the public who worked collaboratively to revise the provisions of the draft Ordinance consistent with feedback from members of the City Council, submissions from the ACLU, and public comments at various Council meetings and Committee hearings. I believe the above-referenced revisions appropriately address the City Council’s concerns, and comments submitted by the ACLU and members of the public at the 8/13/18 Ordinance Committee hearing and throughout this severalyear long process, and I am proud to recommend ordination of this version of the draft Ordinance.

Very truly yours, Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager

12. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to the proposed amended Street Performers Ordinance.
Passed to 2nd Reading as Amended

November 19, 2018
To the Honorable, the City Council:

I write to provide the City Council with a summary of various proposed amendments (the “Proposed Amendments”) to Section 12.16.170 of the Municipal Code (the “Street Performers Ordinance”). A redlined and clean copy of the proposed amended Street Performers Ordinance is attached hereto for your reference.

These Proposed Amendments are recommended based on feedback from members of the street performing community (“buskers”) and Community Arts Advocates, Inc. (“Community Arts Advocates”) to the Arts Council, and public comment at numerous Council hearings and Council Committee hearings over the past three years. I believe that the Proposed Amendments strike the appropriate balance between enabling Arts Council and City staff to more effectively enforce noise and other regulations in the Street Performers Ordinance and encouraging the street performing/busking community to contribute to the vibrancy of our neighborhoods.

After careful review and consideration of the input and feedback provided by various stakeholders, including residents, local street performers/buskers, businesses and retail district partners, Community Arts Advocates, and members of the City Council, I recommend the following Proposed Amendments with the strong support of the street performing/busking community:

These proposed amendments address the aspirations and concerns expressed throughout the multi-year review of the Street Performers Ordinance and I believe will achieve the desired goals of making street performing/busking more accessible and affordable, while at the same time providing for a more efficient permitting process. Please note that members of the street performing/busing community and Community Arts Advocates have indicated to the Arts Council and the City Council that they support charging Permit fees, as they believe that charging such permit fees helps to retain the integrity of the Street Performers Ordinance and encourage compliance with the Ordinance. The street performing community and Community Arts Advocates support the Arts Council’s recommendation to reduce the fees for Permits; however, these groups believe that the City should not abolish fees altogether. Moreover, the imposition of fees for this permitting scheme offset the expense to the Arts Council and the City in administering the Street Performers Ordinance. Please note that the Arts Council issues Permits for performances on a calendar-year basis and therefore new Permits for calendar year 2019 will soon have to be issued. In order for the Arts Council staff to be able to timely incorporate any changes to its licensing scheme into the 2019 permits, the Council would need to act on these amendments before the end of this calendar year.

Very truly yours, Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager

CHARTER RIGHT
1. Further Study Needed on First Street Garage (Order #3 of Nov 5, 2018)
Order Adopted as Amended 8-0-0-1 (Simmons Present)

O-3     Nov 5, 2018  Amended, Charter Right - Simmons
COUNCILLOR ZONDERVAN
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
COUNCILLOR SIDDIQUI
COUNCILLOR CARLONE
WHEREAS: Pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 30B, the City released an RFP on Oct 18, 2018 for the disposition of property to solicit proposals for a leasehold interest of 420 parking spaces and 7,000 square feet of ground floor retail space in the First Street Garage; and
WHEREAS: The disposition of city-owned property is contingent upon the City Council, by a vote of two-thirds majority, finding that the arrangements specified through the RFP process will lead to the greatest public benefit that can be obtained from the City property in question, pursuant to Chapter 2.110 of the City of Cambridge Municipal Code; and
WHEREAS: In 2014, the City Council resolved that “it will not simply consider whether the RFP's agreed-upon price represents the fair market value of the city-owned parking spaces in the First Street Garage, but rather, the City Council will listen closely to the concerns of East Cambridge residents and consider the overall impact of the Sullivan Courthouse redevelopment project in order to determine whether the developer's proposal will lead to the greatest public benefit that can be obtained from the City property in question”; and
WHEREAS: At a meeting on Oct 24, 2018, the East Cambridge Planning Team voted unanimously in opposition to the proposed disposition of First Street Garage; and
WHEREAS: At a community meeting on Oct 30, 2018, which was so well attended it overflowed the room, significant and persistent concerns were raised by members of the community about the proposed disposition and the impact it would have; and
WHEREAS: More than 3 million square feet of office space has been added in Kendall Square and Cambridge Crossing (NorthPoint) since the RFP was originally proposed in 2013, with another 5 million square feet of mixed-use buildings coming to the area over the next 5 years, and a recently announced renovation of CambridgeSide, which will eliminate 800 parking spaces; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to conduct a comprehensive, independent planning, and traffic, and parking study of the neighborhood and use of the First Street Garage, within 6 months and include it in the disposition report as required by 2.110, Section B.6, so that the Council can make an informed decision as to whether the proposed disposition is in the best public interest; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back on this matter as soon as possible.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS
2. That the proposed Municipal Code entitled “Street Performers” in Section 12.16.170 as amended on June 25, 2018 by Policy Order #15 be placed on Unfinished Business awaiting revised ordinance language from the City Solicitor after consultation with the Arts Council based on the recommendations in the Committee Report dated June 25, 2018.
Placed on File

3. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to proposed amendments to the following ordinance: and proposed amendments to Chapter 14.04 of the Cambridge Municipal Code (the "Fair Housing Ordinance). Fair Housing (passed to a 2nd reading) Awaiting Home Rule Legislation - before proposal can be ordained.
No Action

4. An application was received from Martin Cafasso, requesting permission for a curb cut at the premises numbered 19 Fayette Street; said petition has received approval from Inspectional Services, Traffic, Parking and Transportation, Historical Commission and Public Works. No response has been received from the neighborhood association.
Order Adopted

5. A communication transmitted from Louis A. DePasquale, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 18-108, regarding a report on offering early voting in City Council and School Committee Elections. (Awaiting Report referred to Unfinished Business pending response from Legislature)
No Action

APPLICATIONS AND PETITIONS
1. An application was received from CAVA, requesting permission for 4 banners at the premises numbered 88 Ames Street Approval has been received from Inspectional Services, Department of Public Works, Community Development Department and abutter.
Order Adopted

2. A Zoning Petition was received from Anthony F. Gargano on behalf of his Client Hercules Kalogeropoulos, Cambridge Mobile Sound and Security, seeking to amend the zoning map in the area of 234 Monsignor O'Brien Highway, from the existing 'C-1' to Business 'A'.
Referred to Ordinance Committee and Planning Board

COMMUNICATIONS
1. A communication was received from Beth Stevens, 100 Spring Street, regarding support for First Street garage.

2. A communication was received from Alan Green, 82 Fifth Street, regarding support for First Street garage.

3. A communication was received from Tricia Lemon, regarding bike lane safety.

4. A communication was received from Steven Friedman, regarding bike safety.

5. A communication was received from Thomas Cooke, regarding encouraging the City Council to attend the World Day Remembrance and to push forward with the plan to build a 20 mile protected bike lane.

6. A communication was received from Eric Woods, regarding stand with bicycle safety.

7. A communication was received from Joseph Stomberg, regarding bicycle safety in Cambridge.

8. A communication was received from Johan Boneschansker, regarding improving bicycle infrastructure.

9. A communication was received from Aidan O'Donovan, regarding allowing the redevelopment on 40 Thorndike Street.

10. A communication was received from Frederic Wittmann, 16 Traill Street, regarding redevelopment proposal for 40 Thorndike Street.

11. A communication was received from Jeremy Lang, regarding support a protected bike lane network.

12. A communication was received from Robert J. La Tremouille, regarding MassDOT Letter, IRT, I90 Allston rebuild.

13. A communication was received from Joseph E. Connarton, Executive Director, Public Employee Retirement Administration Commission, transmitting the amount to be appropriated for Fiscal Year 2020.

14. A communication was received from Robert L. Lindamood, 29 Otis Street, regarding Sullivan courthouse project.

15. A communication was received from Dog Renter's Association LLC, 54 Bay State Road, regarding asking for the Council's support in what appears to be a violation of Human Rights as tenants.

16. A communication was received from Rosemary Booth, 303 Third Street, regarding withdrawing RFP for First Street garage.

17. A communication was received from Laura Mitas Cardoos, regarding bicycle safety.

18. A communication was received from Charles Hinds, regarding support of Rep. Mike Connolly's letter to City Council.

19. A communication was received from Charles Hinds, regarding support for further study needed on First Street garage .

20. A communication was received from Ilan Levy, 148 Spring Street, regarding the disposition of the First Street garage.

21. A communication was received from Fabrizio Gentili, 72 Sciarappa Street, regarding support for study on parking, traffic and transportation on the entire First Street corridor.

22. A communication was received from Marie Elena Saccoccio, Esquire, regarding First Street garage.

23. A communication was received from Heather Hoffman, regarding First Street garage.

24. A communication was received from Michael Hawley, regarding the RFP's for the First Street garage must be withdrawn.


25. A communication was received from George Schneeloch, 81 School Street, Somerville, regarding Policy Order # 2, requesting a bike infrastructure update from the state with particular emphasis on the intersection of Museum Way and Route 28.

26. A communication was received from Sara Mae Berman, 23 Fayette Street, regarding the unsafe plan for the traffic reconfiguration of Inman Square.

27. A communication was received from Nancy Ryan, 4 Ashburton Place, regarding the Surveillance Ordinance and the disposition of City property regarding the First Street garage.

28. A communication was received from Michael Hawley, 101 Third Street, regarding the First Street garage and that the RFP should be withdraw.

29. A communication was received from Hasson Rashid, 820 Massachusetts Avenue, commenting on Calendar Item # 1 on the First Street garage and issues related to homelessness.

30. A communication was received from Nikki Jordan, 20 Ware Street, regarding Magazine Beach renovations and the attempt to eradicate phragmites from growing at Magazine Beach.

31. Sundry communications received regarding the First Street garage and the City Disposition Ordinance.


RESOLUTIONS
1. Congratulations to Jorie Graham on receiving the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry by the Library of Congress.   Vice Mayor Devereux

2. Resolution on the death of Paul R. Crane.   Councillor Toomey, Councillor Simmons

3. Resolution on the death of Devah Pager.   Vice Mayor Devereux

4. Resolution on the death of Thomas Lang.   Councillor Toomey

5. Resolution on the death of Nancy S. (Rego) DePasquale.   Councillor Toomey

6. Congratulations to Elmendorf Baking Supplies on the occasion of its grand opening on 594 Cambridge Street.   Councillor Toomey

7. Resolution on the death of Emile Durzi.   Vice Mayor Devereux

8. Recognizing the work and legacy of Dr. Joseph J. Harrington.   Mayor McGovern

R-8     Nov 19, 2018
MAYOR MCGOVERN
WHEREAS: Dr. Joseph J. Harrington was a dedicated and impactful public servant, serving as technical advisor to the Water Board under President Don Hornig from 1989 to 1994, as a member of the Water Board from 1994 to 2006, and as President from 1995 until his passing in 2006; and
WHEREAS: Dr. Harrington served dual roles at Harvard University as professor of Environmental Health Engineering and Professor of Environmental Engineering, which reflected his in-depth knowledge of both the mechanisms and health benefits of water quality improvement projects; and
WHEREAS: Dr. Harrington demonstrated his love of the City of Cambridge and his desire to ensure that its citizens enjoyed safe and healthy drinking water; and
WHEREAS: Dr. Harrington contributed to many Cambridge Water Department and regional (MWRA) workshops; and
WHEREAS: During Dr. Harrington’s time as president of the Water Board, he held many meetings to address water quality issues with city stakeholders and other experts; and
WHEREAS: Dr. Harrington stressed the need of the Water Department to take actions that always met the highest standards of public accountability; now therefore be it
RESOLVED: That the City Council bestow its deepest appreciation and honor to Dr. Joseph J. Harrington for his service and dedication to providing quality water infrastructure services that every citizen, visitor, and worker in the city have enjoyed; and be it further
RESOLVED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to prepare a suitably engrossed copy of this resolution to be presented to the Harrington family, including his wife Mary Alice and daughters Beth and Karen, at a ceremony in Dr. Harrington’s honor on Nov 28, 2018, on behalf of the entire City Council.

9. Resolution on the death of Joan "Joanie" Cahill.   Councillor Toomey

10. Congratulations to Brother Frank M. Robinson for being honored at the Evening of Elegance and Love gala by Prince Hall Grand Chapter Order of the Eastern Star Jurisdiction of Massachusetts, Inc. on Dec 1, 2018.   Councillor Simmons


11. Congratulations on the reopening of Bigelow Chapel at Mount Auburn Cemetery.   Councillor Toomey

12. Resolution on the death of Dersley Green.   Councillor Simmons


ORDERS
1. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate City departments to televise and record the joint Public Safety Committee and Transportation & Public Utilities Committee Hearing scheduled for Wed, Nov 28, 2018 at 3:00pm.   Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Kelley
Order Adopted

2. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Director of the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to consult with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the State Delegation representing Route 28, State Representative Mike Connolly and State Senator Sal DiDomenico, for an update on the bike lane installation, and measures and actions such as increased police enforcement of speed limits, to improve safety of Museum Way immediately with particular emphasis on the intersection of Museum Way and Route 28.   Councillor Toomey
Order Adopted

3. That the City Manager work with the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to explore the possibility of posting a "no trucks" sign on Hancock Street.   Councillor Mallon, Councillor Siddiqui
Order Adopted as Amended

4. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Director of the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to amend the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Regulations Article XIV, Section 14.1 Stopping, Standing or Parking to allow for property owners to park in front of their private driveway.   Councillor Toomey, Mayor McGovern
Order Adopted

5. That the City Manager is requested to provide a progress report on the work of the Open Data Review Board and their strategic plan at a future public hearing of the Government Operations, Rules & Claims Committee.   Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Siddiqui, Councillor Kelley
Order Adopted as Amended

6. That the Chairs of the Human Services and Veterans Committee schedule a hearing and invite representatives of the Cambridge Health Alliance to discuss the lessons learned from a tragic occurrence of Sept 16, 2016 and to discuss what measures are being enacted to instill greater levels of confidence in local Cambridge Health Alliance health centers.   Councillor Simmons, Councillor Mallon
Order Adopted

7. That the Economic Development & University Relations Committee is requested to hold a public hearing to discuss the formation of a city commission dedicated to providing a forum for exploring and addressing the concerns of undergraduate, graduate, post-graduate and other post-high school students in Cambridge.   Councillor Kelley, Councillor Siddiqui, Councillor Toomey, Vice Mayor Devereux
Order Adopted

8. That the City Manager work with the Cambridge Arts Council, the Cambridge Women’s Commission, the Cambridge Historical Commission, the Department of Public Works, the Schlesinger Library, and other appropriate departments to establish a diverse commission to conduct the artist selection process and commission opportunity on behalf of the City, with the goal of acknowledging a more representative story of the 19th Amendment and highlighting the contributions of Cambridge women.   Councillor Mallon, Councillor Simmons, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Siddiqui
Order Adopted as Amended

9. That the City Manager is requested to work with CCTV to ensure funding for our municipal media services, and that the City Council go on record opposing a new FCC rule that would severely decrease funding for CCTV and 22CityView by allowing telecommunications companies to deduct in-kind services fees.   Councillor Mallon, Councillor Siddiqui, Vice Mayor Devereux, Mayor McGovern
Order Adopted

10. That the City Manager is requested to inquire with the owners of Twin City Plaza about the leasing of parking spaces for construction vehicle storage instead of storing the vehicles on Gore Street.   Councillor Toomey
Order Adopted as Amended

11. That the Housing Committee Co-Chairs, in collaboration with the City Manager’s Office and the Office of the Mayor, be and hereby are requested to reach out to their counterparts in Boston and Somerville to convene a region-wide discussion about the affordable housing crisis.   Councillor Simmons, Councillor Siddiqui
Order Adopted as Amended

12. That the City Manager is requested to work with the Emergency Communications Department to provide an update on the latest 911 technologies available to Cambridge residents.   Vice Mayor Devereux
Order Adopted

13. That the City Council go on record requesting Governor Baker to properly staff Department of Public Utilities inspectors to ensure the safety of Cambridge residents.   Councillor Zondervan, Mayor McGovern, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Mallon
Order Adopted as Amended


14. Accepting the provisions of Chapter 89 of the Acts of 2018 “AN ACT AUTHORIZING THE CITY OF CAMBRIDGE TO USE CERTAIN LAND ACQUIRED FOR PARK, PLAYGROUND OR RECREATION PURPOSES FOR MUNICIPAL PURPOSES.”   Mayor McGovern
Order Adopted

15. Accepting the provisions of Chapter 93 of the Acts of 2018, “AN ACT AUTHORIZING THE APPOINTMENT OF RETIRED POLICE OFFICERS AS SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS FOR PAID DETAIL ASSIGNMENTS IN THE CITY OF CAMBRIDGE.”   Mayor McGovern
Order Adopted (Kelley NO)


COMMUNICATIONS AND REPORTS FROM OTHER CITY OFFICERS
1. A communication was received from City Clerk Donna P. Lopez, transmitting a communication from Councillor Mallon, transmitting notes of the meeting of the Mayor's Arts Task Force.
Placed on File

TO: Donna Lopez, City Clerk
FROM: Councillor Alanna Mallon
DATE: Nov 14th, 2018
SUBJECT: Submission - Arts Task Force Meeting Notes

Please place the attached notes from the second meeting of the Mayor’s Arts Task Force on the City Council Agenda as “Communications and Reports from Other City Officials” for the Nov 19th meeting. I am also attaching supporting documents from the Nov 8th meeting, which were given as supplemental materials to both members of the Task Force and members of the public who attended and ask that they be included in the communication as well.

Thank you,
Councillor Alanna Mallon


Mayor’s Arts Task Force - Meeting Notes

Second Meeting of the Mayor’s Arts Task Force
Date: Nov 8th, 2018
Location: Spaceus Harvard Square, 20 Brattle St.
Meeting Start: 5:39pm
Meeting Adjourned: 7:34pm

In attendance as members of the Mayor’s Task Force were: Alanna Mallon, Chair; Liana Ascolese, Aide to Councillor Mallon and Executive Assistant to the Task Force; Jero Nesson, Founder of Artspace; Ellen Shakespear, co-founder of Spaceus; Peter DiMuro, Executive Director of the Dance Complex; Ben Simon, EMF musician; Lisa Peterson, Deputy City Manager; Christopher Hope, co-founder of The Loop Lab; Eryn Johnson, Executive Director of the Community Art Center; Geeta Pradhan, President and CEO of the Cambridge Community Foundation; David De Celis, Public Arts Commission; Jason Weeks, Executive Director of the Cambridge Arts Council; Olivia D’Ambrosio, Bridge Repertory Theater; Kelly Sherman, visual artist; Martha McKenna, Director of the Creative Commons at Lesley University; and James Pierre, artist.

Invited as a guest speaker was Malia Lazu from the Urban Labs to facilitate an equity, inclusion, and anti-bias training.

Members of the public in attendance were: Catherine Siller, Robert Goss, Alex Lemski, Joe Stohlman, Jesse Moore, Liz Walker, Pat Magruder, Hannah Smith, Jannie Kitchen, Laura Jasinski, Michelle Douglas, Deidre Tao, Matt Coogan, Beryl Lipton, Jon Glancy, and Nili Ohayon.

To respect the importance of having an open, honest, and productive conversation about equity, diversity, inclusion, and bias, these notes focus on concepts and general discussion only and quotes are not attributed directly to any individual other than Councillor Mallon during her opening and closing remarks and the facilitator, Malia Lazu.

Materials related to this meeting are attached.

Councillor Mallon called the meeting to order at 5:39pm and made an opening statement. She thanked Task Force member Ellen Shakespear and her co-founder, Stephanie Lee, for the use of this space, which is an amazing space for artists to create and sell their work. Spaceus in Harvard Square is a pop up open until the middle of January. She stated the importance of having a shared common language while working on arts issues and policy. Councillor Mallon referenced a New York Times article that was handed out to all members of the Task Force, citing it as a good example of why we are having this conversation tonight, and how ballet dancers and their ballet slippers are illustrative of bias in the arts. Ballet dancers have had pink slippers because they match the skin color of a “typical” ballet dancer. She cited quotes from the article about the struggles of being a dancer of color. Many of them have been dying their slippers for their whole careers because ‘they didn’t know any different.’ The largest manufacturer of ballet slippers is now going to start selling two more colors. It highlights the important question of who belongs in the ballet world? Who owns this space and who can walk the stage? We need to think about the simply things that we often take for granted if we have privilege. What are the places where people just don’t know any different and have not thought about these things?

Councillor Mallon read a short bio introducing Ms. Lazu, tonight’s facilitator: With over two decades of experience building diverse culture in the political and civic space, Ms. Lazu felt the diversity and inclusion industry was in need of disruption in the private sector. While at MIT, Ms. Lazu launched a space for diversity research and development called The Urban Labs, which has emerged as a boutique multi-cultural agency helping corporations and institutions be more effective in their diversity and inclusion efforts. Over the last few years, Ms. Lazu has experimented in attacking ongoing diversity problems, including working with the City of Boston in the startup space, creating Accelerate Boston, an accelerator for creatives. In its first five years, Accelerate Boston helped launch 20+ minority businesses and continues to support minority entrepreneurs in their search for investment capital.

Ms. Lazu opened by stating that it was great to see that Cambridge is taking on an arts task force and that race and equity are being considered upfront instead of as an after the fact. She asked everyone to introduce themselves and use one word to describe their goals for the task force. Words used included: Afrofuturism, community, inspiration, creativity, affordability, vulnerability, access, learning, curating life, making a difference, peace, and diversity.

Ms. Lazu stated the big question is “what does diversity mean for the arts task force? What traditions are we upholding, especially in art, which is so subjective?” We need to start a conversation about bias, so we can talk with each other in a comfortable way if bias is creeping up.

Ms. Lazu went over ground rules to keep the discussion productive and open.

Ms. Lazu used the metaphor of the elephant and the giraffe to illustrate the ways in which unintentional bias can present itself.

Ms. Lazu outlined different types of biases and asked Task Force members to present situations in which each type of bias occurs in the art world. The first type is institutional bias: policies and practices of institutions that, intentionally or not, produce outcomes that chronically favor, or put racial or other minority groups at a disadvantage.

The task force members gave examples of institutional bias in the art world, such as:
- Whose art gets chosen to be showcased
- Applications that rely on technological skills and English language proficiency
- What different venues allow to be performed and displayed
- Certain types of art like graffiti being branded as “not art”
- Opportunities available through only social networks
- Who and what can get a permit from the City

Ms. Lazu asked the group what it takes to be an artist. Many don’t make a lot of money, so this pushes people out before they can ever even break into the field. She brought up the discussion of “outsider art” on an episode of Jim and Marjorie on NPR, and why certain people or types of art were considered “outsiders” and not just “art.” She stated it’s important to ask questions like what does community art mean? Who is in power? Does this truly represent the community? We need to consider the importance of terminology and the words we use to discuss certain types of art.

There was a comment about people not being able to hold more than one idea in their head about what can be “good” and “rigorous” in the art world. Dance - ballet vs. hip hop - was cited as an example.

Ms. Lazu stated that the question “who decides?” is important to consider when evaluating structural bias. Structural bias is a system in which public policies, institutional practices, cultural representations, and other norms work in various, often reinforcing ways, to perpetuate inequity. She brought up the example of norms such as the ballet shoes from the NYT article - whose feet even belong in ballet shoes? How do we ensure that norms don’t perpetuate inequity? Who is worthy of exposure and who is worthy of being paid?

Ms. Lazu stated that structural and institutional bias are things that “happen.” It’s hard to check ourselves because bias exists in institutions and structures, and we are social beings who operate within the structures given to us.

Ms. Lazu then moved the discussion to implicit bias. Implicit bias is also known as implicit social cognition, which refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. This bias is deep, and often begs the question what is presentable and what is not? There is implicit bias in art and within the diversity of neighborhoods in Cambridge. It’s important to check individual implicit bias, and how will our own biases show up?

A discussion was had about Central Square and always being “stuck” with murals and graffiti. Before people saw the murals, they were skeptical that they would actually be art. This causes us to ask questions about who owns community art and who should be making decisions about it? Something that one person considers art may not be considered art in another community and vice versa.

The group moved into a discussion about exploring why people come to Cambridge and what belonging means.

A member made comments about people in Cambridge being self-righteous and too smart for their own good, they don’t want to take a step back and examine themselves, and don’t hold the mirror far enough away from themselves. The ideal collaboration is people coming together with no agenda, but too many people in Cambridge have one.

Members made comments about artist live/work space and why artists should be prioritized. There was a discussion about the bias people have towards artists and why they don’t belong - because they are poor by choice, art should be a low paying field, and that artists should just get higher paying jobs? The fundamental value of art is lower, and art is often an afterthought instead of being integrated.

One member commented that there was implicit bias within our group - who we talk to and socialize with before and after meetings, and who we are open to. Also, not everyone wants to speak to all parts of their identity, but we do have to question our own assumptions and push ourselves to make connections even if we have a perceived difference. We are all at different levels of understanding this, some people are at different levels than others.

Ms. Lazu brought up the importance of mission statements and whether businesses or arts organizations have diversity language in their mission. There are resources to help in crafting this language, which is a good opportunity to hold a mirror up to ourselves. She referenced a Ted Talk called “Flip It to Test It” to help us challenge the assumptions we make about certain groups and help question biases within ourselves.

A discussion was held about public art, and who even has access to spaces in the first place. There are many arts spaces that are off limits to certain demographics, which is why the conversation around public art is so important because it’s so accessible.

One member asked who art programs are suggested to and brought up which young people can or cannot break into the field. Only certain people are even given the opportunity to build that network and there are many biases in programming.

Many members questioned how accessible public art really is. Many people are unaware that the percent for art program is an ordinance to ensure that people have a right to art. Too many people and programs are unknown to each other - networks do not intersect.

A discussion was had about what the word access specifically means. It’s often a broad term but we need to know how and why we are using it. There are many kinds of access and non-access. Is it economic? Feeling like you belong? Physical access? Time for access?

The group discussed the way we run our own institutions and accepting a business model vs. the work that artists do no their own administrating on a shoestring budget. Artists have a wealth of information about different ways to work that other institutions should adopt. There are multiple ways to look at a problem. There is something within the nature of the business model and funding for many art projects that is too exclusive.

Ms. Lazu led the group in a discussion about the “belonging framework.” She went over the following definitions:
Diversity: the condition of having or being composed of differing elements
Inclusion: to take in or compromise as a part of a whole or group
Belonging: to be a member or a part of

Ms. Lazu explained that belonging is an emotional shift - it’s different than including someone to check a box and not caring about they feel about being included. You can’t include people and assume they should go along with the way things are, or the way you want them.

“Diversity is inviting people to the party, inclusion is asking them to dance. But belonging is asking them to help plan the party.”

The way you get to belonging is by being curious and not just making assumptions about others.

Belonging involves symbols that are shared and largely recognizable, which is hugely important in the arts.

Ms. Lazu asked the group how they know they belong in Cambridge.

One member said they do not feel like they belong in Cambridge despite being a lifelong resident. The City has changed a lot and they are uncomfortable a lot of the time because of other people’s actions. Others have been talking about this for a long time as well.

“Belonging is being absolutely comfortable.”

Another member felt like an outsider in a workplace because of not being from Cambridge or living there, despite working and being part of the community. People not being from here is a uniquely New England way because many people stay here long term. There was a discussion about the means testing of belonging, such as people asking questions, testing you, looking for cues as to who belongs.

Ms. Lazu asked how public art and art programming can promote a sense of belonging. Artists are the keepers of truth, which is what is important about them. She discussed the MLK memorial proposed for the Boston Common. What is actually the spirit of the arts? There is one choice for a statue of hands, vs. the other choice of building a space where people can protest. Arts can be used as a vehicle of justice.

We need to ask ourselves if we are seeking opinions from diverse groups of people, or if we’re in our own echo chamber. We need to be curious and test our own observations.

One member talked about art during pride and the proliferation of rainbows that helped them affirm their identity but asked why this feeling of acceptance can’t be present year-round.

Another member talked about how belonging can be two ways: the belonging that we feel, and the affirming identity that others give us. The arts are where people have their stories, cultures, and experiences reflected and affirmed, so people need to see their world in art. Everyone wants to tell their story but if there’s not a place for that, they feel like they don’t belong. We have the capacity in this group to be able to create spaces, events, opportunity for diversity in Cambridge.

Another member stated that people and buildings in Cambridge have been changing in the predictable ways. The City is gearing towards wealthier people and when you’re one of the only people left, other affirmations of your identity aren’t enough. We have a culture and system of displacement that prioritizes wealthy people, and band aid solutions aren’t enough when systems are rigged against people like artists and other low-income people.

Another member stated that changes have been brought on by gentrification. Cambridge has social justice values, but they don’t always translate. We as a society and culture have not had to grapple with that yet.

Ms. Lazu broke the task force members into small groups to discuss three questions amongst themselves:
1. What are some opportunities for the arts task force to promote belonging?
2. What do you think is the biggest challenge the task force has to overcome to be successful?
3. How will we know if we succeed?

Group #1 reported back:
Opportunities - we can help increase access to grants, applying for permits, helping with administrative issues if you’re an artist who’s not that type of person. They may have self-selected out of this process because they feel it’s a tough space. Is there a possibility of reexamining these structures and policies? We need more advocacy opportunities for artists. It may be helpful to have volunteers or hiring people on a City level to help artists in this regard to provide mentorship. It may be possible to use open studios as a launch point for organizing, creating guilds/associations to help people organize and negotiate.
Challenges - creating holistic involvement for all levels of socioeconomic access. The conversation about art in Cambridge should be focused on the critical, relevant, and hard topics. Art is relevant and a necessity, empowering and creating social change.
Success - People need to see themselves reflected and connected with larger humanity, engage with art making process. We need to embed artists in the community and create opportunities to do this.

Group #2 reported back:
Opportunities - we need to ask who is not here, move to where the people are. We need to step up and step back, looking carefully at who currently takes up the most space and how do we balance this?
Challenges - we need to have an honest dialogue, sometimes we bite our tongues on issues to not hurt feelings, but we also need to have comfort in both talking and listening. The City is divided, the landscape has changed, there are more racial and class divisions. We also need to have a specific charge and ways to implement our recommendations.
Success - we need to have agreed upon outcomes and hold each other accountable. We need to integrate the two Cambridges, making art accessible and having a higher level of awareness.

Group #3 reported back:
Opportunities - to recognize the importance of arts in the innovation DNA of the City, and to lift up the value of arts to recognize it as intrinsically valuable to the success of Cambridge. We need to also focus on the people who create the arts.
Challenges - how do we lift up the arts? How do we value the arts at the level we value business or science? Public art can be inanimate, but how can we actually support the people creating it? How do we combat the marginalization of arts? Why aren’t the arts a part of how we think about public health, inequity, violence prevention, etc.?

Group #4 reported back:
Opportunities - everyone that’s here has an opportunity to connect and get to know each other and network.
Challenges - funding, reinforcing events that the City has for everyone to enjoy in a more multimedia, multi-pronged kind of way, especially inter-generationally and in more creative and accessible ways. Weather is an issue because we only have 5-6 months to be outside and spend time as a community together. No artists have enough resources so there is often not a lot of unity - do we collectively have the ability to look at the whole landscape in a way that’s not possible with other groups?
Success - we have an opportunity to strength the arts community and we are in the process of defining how to do that. We have the potential to evaluate other City organizations and make very concrete recommendations that can be acted on to guarantee and clarify sources of funding. We need a more defined charged to know what our goals and opportunities and resources actually are.

Ms. Lazu wrapped up the training and held a short debrief.

Councillor Mallon thanked everyone for participating in the training and thanked Ms. Lazu for her facilitation. She announced that the next meeting will take place on Thurs, Dec 13th from 5:30pm-7:30pm. She stated that the meeting location is at the MIT Visual Arts Center – 345 Vassar St., which is accessible by the CT2 bus at the Amesbury St. @ Vassar St. stop.

Councillor Mallon adjourned the meeting at 7:34pm.

2. A communication was received from City Clerk Donna P. Lopez, transmitting recommendations required to accept three State Statutes.
Placed on File, Order #14 and Order #15 Adopted


3. A communication was received from City Clerk Donna P. Lopez, transmitting a communication from Vice Mayor Devereux regarding City Ordinance 2.110.010 entitled Disposition of City Property as it relates to the First Street garage.
Referred to Calendar Item #1


HEARING SCHEDULE
Mon, Nov 19
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Tues, Nov 20
1:00pm   The Public Safety Committee will conduct a public hearing to review the current status of the Short-Term rental (STR) registration and enforcement efforts in Cambridge, including any legal proceedings, the exploration of possible new legal proceedings against illegal STR operators or platforms and will assess the City’s need to implement new policies or contracts given the state’s inability to create a master registration of any sort and to discuss opportunities to work with the state to create a funding stream for STRs.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 26
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Tues, Nov 27
4:00pm   The Transportation and Public Utilities Committee will conduct a public hearing to discuss the next the steps in creating a protected bike network and an update on future Vision Zero infrastructure improvements.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, Nov 28
12:00pm   The Housing Committee conduct a public hearing to continue discussions on the proposed Affordable Housing Overlay District and on the first annual Inclusionary Zoning report.  (Sullivan Chamber)
3:00pm   The Public Safety Committee and the Transportation and Public Utilities Committee will conduct a joint public hearing to discuss truck safety measures in the City and to review the Police Department’s truck enforcement actions and whether Cambridge can better use navigational platforms, such as Garmin, signage to keep trucks off of illegal or impractical roads, how Cambridge may extend its no-truck designations, update on how the sideguard pilot programs are working and how City contracts may be used to demand safer vehicles for both contractors and sub-contractors for City projects and similar truck-related issues.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Thurs, Nov 29
5:00pm   The Neighborhood and Long-Term Planning, Public Facilities, Arts and Celebrations Committee will conduct a public hearing to discuss Urban Form Recommendations from the Community Development Department.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 3
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Tues, Dec 4
12:00pm   The Government Operations, Rules and Claims will conduct a hearing to consider claims filed against the City.  (Ackerman Room)
5:00pm   The Health and Environmental Committee will conduct a public hearing to review the preliminary LiDAR-based canopy study results from Apr 1, 2018 and to discuss potential reasons for the precipitous decline in our tree canopy and any other related matter.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, Dec 5
3:00pm   The Public Safety Committee will conduct a public hearing to explore the legal options Cambridge does and does not have when permitting existing, new and emerging mobility platforms in Cambridge; said uses will include the ability for Cambridge to regulate platforms that operate Non-City property and the differences between streets and sidewalks when considering what permits are needed and any regulatory gaps that might exist where City permitting authority is unclear but desired and how the City may get that necessary authority.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 10
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 17
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Tues, Dec 18
3:00pm   The Public Safety Committee will conduct a public hearing TBA.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 31
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Jan 7
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, Jan 9
5:30pm   The Ordinance Committee will conduct a public hearing to discuss the proposed amendment to the Municipal Code in Chapter 8.66 entitled “Tree Protection” to amend section 8.66.40 entitled “Applicability” and by adding a new section 8.66.050 entitled “Procedure for other projects”  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Jan 14
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Jan 28
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Feb 4
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Feb 11
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Feb 25
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 4
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 11
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 18
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 25
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Apr 1
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Apr 8
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Apr 22
5:30pm   City Council Meeting - Budget Submission  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Apr 29
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, May 1
9:00am   Finance Committee hearing to discuss proposed FY20 City Budget.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, May 6
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Tues, May 7
9:00am   Finance Committee hearing to discuss proposed FY20 City Budget.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, May 8
6:00pm   Finance Committee hearing to discuss FY20 School Department Budget   (Sullivan Chamber)

Thurs, May 9
9:00am   Finance Committee hearing to discuss proposed FY20 City Budget (if necessary).  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, May 20
5:30pm   City Council Meeting - Budget Adoption  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, June 3
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, June 10
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, June 17
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, June 24
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

TEXT OF ORDERS
O-1     Nov 19, 2018
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate City departments to televise and record the joint Public Safety Committee and Transportation & Public Utilities Committee Hearing scheduled for Wed, Nov 28, 2018 at 3:00pm.

O-2     Nov 19, 2018
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: On Mar 19, 2018, the City Council unanimously adopted an order to direct the City Manager to instruct the Director of the Traffic, Parking, and Transportation Department and any other relative City departments to review what traffic-calming measures or actions that can be taken to discourage the speeding of vehicles along Museum Way; and
WHEREAS: The actions and measures that were asked to be considered were the installation of speed bumps, installation of crosswalk flashing lights and increased police enforcement of speed limits; and
WHEREAS: In a response presented to the Council on July 30, 2018; the Traffic, Parking, and Transportation Department collected speed data on June 6 and June 7, 2018; and
WHEREAS: According to the report, the Average Daily Traffic on Museum Way is 5,800 vehicles; and
WHEREAS: It was reported that traffic-calming measures are intended to reduce traffic speeds and do not reduce traffic volumes and that most of the vehicles on Museum Way were traveling close to the speed limit and that traffic-calming on this street would not be a high priority; and
WHEREAS: The City further reported that they would continue to monitor the traffic speed and evaluate the potential for traffic calming measures; and
WHEREAS: During City Council discussion of the report, it was noted that this traffic study was done during the summer when many programs of Hult International Businesses school are not in session; and
WHEREAS: An additional issue that was noted in the report was that some vehicles increased their speed approaching Charles River Dam Road (Rt. 28) in order to catch a green signal; and
WHEREAS: Route 28 is a state-owned road and where it intersects with Museum Way is an extremely dangerous intersection; and
WHEREAS: On Fri Nov 9, 2018, troopers from the State Police barracks in Boston responded to reports of a bicyclist struck by a dump truck at the intersection of Museum Way and Monsignor O’Brien Highway and tragically the cyclist died as a result of injuries sustained during the incident; and
WHEREAS: The State has a bike lane plan for that stretch of state road; and
WHEREAS: There was a delay in implementation due to the rerouting of Longfellow Bridge; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Director of the Traffic, Parking and Transportation and any other relative City departments on what attempts were made to discuss with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts on improving safety of this street and the intersection; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to instruct the Director of the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department, along with any other relevant City department, to conduct another traffic study in the area during a time when more of the programs from Hult International Business School are in session; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to instruct the Director of the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to consult with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the State Delegation representing Route 28, State Representative Mike Connolly and State Senator Sal DiDomenico, for an update on the bike lane installation, and measures and actions such as increased police enforcement of speed limits, to improve safety of Museum Way immediately with particular emphasis on the intersection of Museum Way and Route 28; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the Council no later than the Dec 3, 2018 meeting.

O-3     Nov 19, 2018  Amended
COUNCILLOR MALLON
COUNCILLOR SIDDIQUI
WHEREAS: Large trucks, including 18-wheelers, rely on GPS technology to navigate through our City, that often leads them down narrow side streets, which is hazardous to the neighborhood; and
WHEREAS: Large trucks unable to turn at narrow intersections or navigate down narrow streets have repeatedly collided with and damaged telephone poles; and
WHEREAS: Trucks traveling down narrow streets have also done irreparable damage to residents’ personal property, such as their cars and even homes; and
WHEREAS: This has been an issue, especially on Hancock Street between Massachusetts Avenue and Kinnaird Street, where GPS is instructing 18 wheelers to travel down streets that are simply not wide enough; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to work with the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to explore the possibility of posting a “no trucks” sign on Hancock Street between Massachusetts Avenue and Kinnaird Street; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on this matter in a timely manner.

O-4     Nov 19, 2018
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
MAYOR MCGOVERN
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department has changed the way in which they now choose to enforce the regulations about property owners blocking their own private driveway; and
WHEREAS: According to the department, allowing property owners to park their vehicle in front of their private driveway was merely an accommodation and had never been memorialized in any regulations; and
WHEREAS: Being able to block one’s own private driveway was a serious benefit to the households who had more than one car and guests and freed up much needed spaces for other neighbors; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to instruct the Director of the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to amend the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Regulations Article XIV, Section 14.1 Stopping, Standing or Parking to allow for property owners to park in front of their private driveway.

O-5     Nov 19, 2018  Amended
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
COUNCILLOR SIDDIQUI
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
WHEREAS: The Open Data Ordinance was passed on Sept 21, 2015 and created the Cambridge Open Data Review Board and included a requirement for periodic updates to the City Council on that board’s progress; and
WHEREAS: The last update received by the City Council on this topic was delivered at a Neighborhood and Long-Term Planning Committee hearing on June 1, 2017; and
WHEREAS: The Open Data Review Board recently released a strategic plan and requested public comment be made on that plan by Dec 14, 2018; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to post the minutes of the Open Data Review Board in the Open Meeting Portal and to provide a progress report on the work of the Open Data Review Board and their strategic plan at a future public hearing of the Government Operations, Rules & Claims Committee.

O-6     Nov 19, 2018
COUNCILLOR SIMMONS
COUNCILLOR MALLON
WHEREAS: On Nov 3, 2018, the Boston Globe Magazine published an article that detailed how a series of events unfolded in the early morning hours of Sept 16, 2016 at Somerville Hospital which resulted in the tragic death of 34-year old Laura Levis; and
WHEREAS: In subsequent articles and in public statements, the leadership from the Cambridge Health Alliance, the parent organization that oversees Somerville Hospital and Cambridge Hospital, relayed their deep remorse over the events that lead to Ms. Levis’s death, and discussed some of the measures that have been taken in response to that tragedy; and
WHEREAS: The people of Cambridge, many of whom depend upon the Cambridge Health Alliance as their main healthcare provider, deserve to have a greater understanding of how the events at Somerville Hospital detailed in the Boston Globe Magazine article are being processed and used to prevent similar such occurrences in any Cambridge Health Alliance facility going forward; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the Chairs of the Human Services and Veterans Committee schedule a hearing and invite representatives of the Cambridge Health Alliance to discuss the lessons learned from this tragic occurrence and to discuss what measures are being enacted to instill greater levels of confidence in local Cambridge Health Alliance health centers.

O-7     Nov 19, 2018
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
COUNCILLOR SIDDIQUI
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
WHEREAS: With multiple universities, colleges and other institutes of higher learning within its borders, Cambridge has a large percentage of full- or part-time residents and nonresidents who are also college or university students; and
WHEREAS: While there is a City Council committee that addresses relationships with between educational institutions and City governance and a separate City Youth Council comprised of high school students that focuses on improving the lives of youth in Cambridge, there is no civic body that exists specifically as a forum for higher education students to have conversations with City leaders on any number of local issues that are particularly impactful on these students; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge has a variety of civic boards and commissions that provide forums for other specific groups with defined interests; and
WHEREAS: Having such a civic body may be useful in understanding and addressing both long-term and immediate concerns of Cambridge’s student population; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the Economic Development & University Relations Committee be and hereby is requested to hold a public hearing to explore this idea in greater detail with the intent of providing the City Manager a more detailed request to form a city commission dedicated to providing a forum for exploring and addressing the concerns of undergraduate, graduate, post-graduate and other post-high school students in Cambridge.

O-8     Nov 19, 2018  Amended
COUNCILLOR MALLON
COUNCILLOR SIMMONS
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
COUNCILLOR SIDDIQUI
WHEREAS: On June 4, 2018, the City Council passed a Policy Order to commission a public artwork that will memorialize and commemorate the passage of the 19th Amendment and the many women in Cambridge who fought so hard for the right to women’s suffrage; and
WHEREAS: To this end, an artist must be fairly identified through a Request for Proposal (RFP) process or a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) process, and a commission is required to establish guidelines for an RFP/RFQ and move this process forward; and
WHEREAS: The story of suffrage is long and, in many ways, unfinished, making it extremely important to acknowledge and include the contributions of underrepresented women at the forefront of our goals for the memorial, so that we are not simply retelling the popular mythology of suffrage, but rather we are presenting the full picture of the struggle and impact of the unrecognized women in Cambridge; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to work with the Cambridge Arts Council, the Cambridge Women’s Commission, the Cambridge Historical Commission, the Department of Public Works, Election Commission, the Schlesinger Library, and other appropriate departments to establish a diverse commission to conduct the artist selection process and commission opportunity on behalf of the City, with the goal of acknowledging a more representative story of the 19th Amendment and highlighting the contributions of Cambridge women; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on this matter.

O-9     Nov 19, 2018
COUNCILLOR MALLON
COUNCILLOR SIDDIQUI
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
MAYOR MCGOVERN
WHEREAS: Telecommunications companies are required to compensate municipalities for their use of public rights of way, and this compensation is used to fund community media centers and local cable channels such as Cambridge Community Television (CCTV) and 22 CityView; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge signed its initial cable license in 1985, and said license has been renewed in both 2001 and 2011; and
WHEREAS: The current license agreement requires Comcast to pay the City franchise fees equaling 5% of its gross revenues in Cambridge, and this agreement expires in 2021; and
WHEREAS: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has proposed a new rule that would allow telecommunications companies like Comcast to deduct any in kind services provided to the City from the required amount to be paid by its licensing fee; and
WHEREAS: This new fee structure would pose a great threat to CCTV and 22 CityView, which have been pillars of the community, keeping the public informed about municipal government, City events, and local news; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to work with CCTV and all other appropriate departments to ensure funding for this vital municipal service; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on this matter; and be it further
RESOLVED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward a suitably engrossed copy of this resolution to members of the Cambridge Congressional Delegation on behalf of the entire City Council.

O-10     Nov 19, 2018  Amended
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: As the construction on Gore Street continues, there has been significant resident concerns about the contractor leaving construction vehicles parked overnight on Gore Street and adjacent streets especially between 5th and 6th Street; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to inquire with the owners of Twin City Plaza about the leasing of parking spaces for construction vehicle storage; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council no later than the Dec 3, 2018 Council Meeting.

O-11     Nov 19, 2018  Amended
COUNCILLOR SIMMONS
COUNCILLOR SIDDIQUI
WHEREAS: Over the course of the past decade, the City Council has increasingly been directing its energies on how to adequately address the housing affordability crisis that has been so prevalent and negatively impacted so many in our community; and
WHEREAS: While no one single solution for this housing crisis has been determined, there is widespread agreement that this is not merely a Cambridge issue, and is instead an issue that is impacting the larger Greater Boston region; and
WHEREAS: As this is an issue that is having a significant impact upon housing options in Cambridge, Boston, and Somerville in particular, it would be helpful to convene a regional discussion with the City of Boston and the City of Somerville about how to more effectively work together to address this region-wide housing affordability crisis; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the Housing Committee Co-Chairs, in collaboration with the City Manager’s Office and the Office of the Mayor, be and hereby are requested to reach out to their counterparts in Boston and Somerville to convene a region-wide discussion about the affordable housing crisis, and to report back to the City Council on this matter in a timely manner.

O-12     Nov 19, 2018
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
WHEREAS: There have been recent improvements in Enhanced 911 and Smart911 technology that could make locating residents in the event of an emergency easier and more efficient, potentially providing critical minutes necessary to save lives; and
WHEREAS: Residents may be unfamiliar with the enhanced 911 features available to them, and unaware of recent changes to the RapisSOS Haven app; and
WHEREAS: It is vital to the safety of residents that more public outreach be done and information be made available on the options available; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to work with the Emergency Communications Department to provide an update on the latest 911 technologies available to Cambridge residents; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on this matter.

O-13     Nov 19, 2018  Amended
COUNCILLOR ZONDERVAN
MAYOR MCGOVERN
VICE MAYOR DEVEREUX
COUNCILLOR MALLON
WHEREAS: A series of incidents and reported violations including the September 2018 tragedy in Merrimack Valley have raised significant concerns about both the safety of aging methane gas infrastructure in The Commonwealth and the companies charged with maintaining it; and
WHEREAS: A report released by the National Transit Safety Board found that the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) had only a fraction of its inspector positions filled in the weeks leading up to the Merrimack Valley tragedy; and
WHEREAS: DPU Inspectors play a critically important role in ensuring the safety of every resident of the Commonwealth; and
WHEREAS: Data from DPU indicates that there were 15,829 unrepaired gas pipeline leaks across the Commonwealth in 2017, including 262 unrepaired leaks in Cambridge; now therefore be it
RESOLVED: That the City Council go on record requesting Governor Baker to properly staff DPU inspectors to ensure our safety; and be it further
RESOLVED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward suitably engrossed copies of this resolution to Governor Baker as well as Angela M. O’Connor, Chairman of the Department of Public Utilities, State and the Congressional delegations, on behalf of the entire City Council.

AWAITING REPORT LIST
16-26. Report on the possibility of the City Council implementing a zoning change, on the permitting of all new restaurants where a wood-fired oven is used as a significant method of food preparation. On a communication from Councillor Kelley requesting that this matter be forwarded to the 2018-2019 Legislative Session.
Councillor Carlone, Councillor Devereux, Councillor Kelley (O-5) from 4/4/2016

16-42. Report on plans for the former Riverside Community Health Center on Western Avenue, including transfer of ownership of the building to the City and the process for determining future usage. On a communication from Councillor Kelley requesting that this matter be forwarded to the 2018-2019 Legislative Session.
Vice Mayor McGovern (O-1) from 5/2/2016

16-83. Report on drafting possible legislation and other recommendations for interim actions to identify and address the public health impacts of any commercial wood-fired ovens. On a communication from Councillor Kelley requesting that this matter be forwarded to the 2018-2019 Legislative Session.
Mayor Simmons (Calendar Item #4) from 10/31/2016

16-101. Report on the potential of building below market rental housing on City-owned parking lots along Bishop Allen Drive. On a communication from Councillor McGovern requesting that this matter be forwarded to the 2018-2019 Legislative Session.
Vice Mayor McGovern, Mayor Simmons (O-4) from 12/12/2016

16-108. Report on whether people displaced and qualify for Emergency Status who are using Section 8 in other cities or towns can retain their resident preference for the purpose of Inclusionary Housing. On a communication from Councillor Kelley requesting that this matter be forwarded to the 2018-2019 Legislative Session.
Mayor Simmons, Councillor Toomey (O-4) from 12/19/2016

17-22. Report on the potential growth of next-generation wireless technology in the City, to include: the expected footprint of citywide coverage from just one company and what market competition might produce; the integration of public and private infrastructure to support the network; what local standards the City might hope to maintain relative to aesthetics and safety; and how this new technology fits into our Broadband access plans. On a communication from Councillor Kelley requesting that this matter be forwarded to the 2018-2019 Legislative Session.
Councillor Cheung, Councillor Devereux, Councillor Kelley (O-14) from 2/27/2017

17-87. Report on a schedule for resubmitting a revised draft of the Outdoor Lighting Ordinance that incorporates clearer wording and/or more clearly explains each section in less technical jargon and is more coherent in its entirety, with the goal of seeing such an Ordinance adopted by the end of this City Council term. On a communication from Councillor Kelley and Councillor Devereux requesting that this matter be forwarded to the 2018-2019 Legislative Session.
Councillor Carlone, Councillor Devereux (O-8) from 9/18/2017

18-4. Report on exploring mechanisms for achieving greater levels of snow clearing by the city and increase the public response during major snow events or heavy snow winters.
Councillor Zondervan, Mayor McGovern, Vice Mayor Devereux (O-5) from 1/22/2018

18-6. Report on information regarding electronic device usage by City-elected officials.
Councillor Toomey (O-7) from 1/22/2018

18-7. Report on the possibility of changing the snow removal exemption to include two and three-family houses.
Councillor Toomey (O-1) from 1/29/2018

18-10. Report on creating a list of mitigated meeting and conference room private spaces that are available to the public, what the exact eligibility of using these spaces is, and making the list available to the public.  See Mgr #7
Councillor Toomey (O-5) from 1/29/2018

18-15. Report on any other relevant City Department to gain a sense of who is purchasing buildings in Cambridge.
Councillor Simmons (O-3) from 2/5/2018

18-21. Report on the feasibility of initiating a formal transit study and action plan of the Alewife area in response to unanimous concerns of the Envision Alewife Working Group.
Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Carlone, Councillor Siddiqui (O-7) from 2/26/2018

18-27. Report on why there continues to be significant audio and video difficulties during live internet broadcasts of City Council meetings.
Councillor Simmons (Calendar Item #1) from 3/5/2018

18-37. Report on the possibility of accepting the City of Boston's invitation to join their intergenerational housing pilot program.
Councillor Mallon, Councillor Siddiqui, Councillor Simmons, Councillor Toomey (O-1) from 3/26/2018

18-38. Report on inventory of all City-owned vacant buildings and lots and the City's plans for them, if any.
Councillor Mallon, Councillor Simmons, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Siddiqui (O-2) from 3/26/2018

18-44. Report on ensuring an additional commitment of $20 million from the City’s budget is devoted over the next five years toward the City’s efforts to preserve and create affordable housing units.
Councillor Simmons, Councillor Siddiqui (O-6) from 4/23/2018

18-53. Report on an updated schedule for resubmitting a revised draft of the Outdoor Lighting Ordinance that incorporates suggestions from the Light Cambridge Committee by June 11, 2018.
Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Carlone (O-1) from 5/14/2018

18-58. Report on the Housing Committee and how the City could establish a method of eviction data collection.
Councillor Simmons, Councillor Siddiqui (O-5) from 5/21/2018

18-60. Report on a small business parking pilot that would allow temporary on-street employee parking during typical daytime operating hours.
Councillor Mallon, Councillor Siddiqui, Councillor Simmons (Calendar Item #1) from 5/14/2018

18-61. Report on commissioning a public art piece, statue, or memorial that would commemorate the dedication of women in Cambridge to passing the Nineteenth Amendment.
Councillor Mallon, Councillor Simmons, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Siddiqui (O-5) from 6/4/2018

18-62. Report on acquiring Big Belly Solar trash cans to replace the current open top trash receptacles, with an emphasis on the business districts.  See Mgr #4
Mayor McGovern, Councillor Mallon, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Carlone (O-1) from 6/18/2018

18-65. Report on working with the Mayor’s Summer Youth Program and other appropriate City departments to organize a Town Hall Meeting for Cambridge youth.
Councillor Simmons, Councillor Mallon, Mayor McGovern (O-5) from 6/18/2018

18-66. Report on establishing a Young Adult Civic Unity Committee to be modeled after the Citizen Civic Unity Committee and to recruit applicants from all across the community and across all socio-economic backgrounds.
Councillor Simmons (O-7) from 6/18/2018

18-68. Report on determining the permitting and legality issues of Peer-to-Peer Car Sharing in the City of Cambridge.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Zondervan (O-11) from 6/18/2018

18-73. Report on establishing and implementing a dynamic new initiative that will seek to place Port residents (ages 18 and over) on paths to jobs with family-sustaining wages.
Councillor Simmons (O-6) from 6/25/2018

18-78. Report on meeting with representatives from DCR, Friends of Magazine Beach, the cycling community, and all other stakeholders to develop a design and funding plan to ensure that the essential safety upgrades to the Paul Dudley White Community Path are completed to complement the ongoing Magazine Beach renovations.  See Mgr #9
Councillor Zondervan, Vice Mayor Devereux (O-13) from 6/25/2018

18-79. Report on the Grand Junction Overlay District and provide update in September.
Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Carlone (O-2) from 7/30/2018

18-81. Report on efforts to be made to ensure that at least one public building at an accessible location can be open on a Sunday or holiday that coincides with an extreme heat event.
Vice Mayor Devereux, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Siddiqui (O-4) from 7/30/2018

18-83. Report on an action plan to work with the City’s Community-Based Organizations to create a network of summertime evening programming to reduce the threat of violence in the City’s public spaces in 2019 and beyond.
Councillor Simmons, Councillor Zondervan, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Mallon (O-9) from 7/30/2018

18-85. Report on the feasibility of appointing an advisory committee to work through resiliency elements raised during the Envision process and through the Brown petition.  See Mgr #10
Councillor Toomey (O-13) from 7/30/2018

18-86. Report on the feasibility of adopting a policy of replacing any failed 4000K LED streetlights with warmer alternatives as opportunities arise, and offering shielding/filtering upon request from nearby residents whenever possible.
Councillor Zondervan, Councillor Carlone, Councillor Kelley, Vice Mayor Devereux (O-14) from 7/30/2018

18-87. Report on the navigational editing capabilities of the City of Cambridge.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Zondervan, Councillor Mallon, Vice Mayor Devereux (O-16) from 7/30/2018

18-88. Report on contracting with an outside survey company to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of inclusionary tenants' experiences, with a particular emphasis on biased practices.
Councillor Mallon, Councillor Simmons, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Siddiqui (O-17) from 7/30/2018

18-90. Report on the feasibility of establishing a crosswalk at the intersection of Soden Street and Western Avenue.  See Mgr #5
Councillor Simmons (Calendar Item #3) from 9/24/2018

18-91. Report on drafting a plan that shall allow the Mayor’s Annual Harvard Senior Luncheon to be held regardless of the weather conditions.
Councillor Simmons, Councillor Siddiqui (Calendar Item #4) from 9/24/2018

18-92. Report on increasing enforcement of the Bike Lane Bill to keep our bicycle infrastructure free and unobstructed.
Mayor McGovern, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Zondervan (Calendar Item #6) from 9/24/2018

18-93. Report on the sale of The Constellation Center's Parcel C in Kendall Square.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Toomey (Calendar Item #7) from 9/24/2018

18-94. Report on considering to work with consultants and other available resources to help incorporate data access and management concerns into discussions, permits and licenses for new mobility platforms.
Councillor Kelley (Calendar Item #8) from 9/24/2018

18-96. Report on how the City views internet-based platforms as opportunities for outreach and communication and what sort of guidelines have been, or are being, developed to help everyone understand how the City’s various departments do or do not utilize these communication resources and how any communications on these platforms are managed so that the messaging and information is kept up-to-date.
Councillor Kelley (Calendar Item #10) from 9/24/2018

18-97. Report on updating the vacant property database as well as reviewing the strategies presented in the Storefront Vacancies Best Practices Report.
Councillor Siddiqui, Councillor Mallon, Councillor Zondervan, Councillor Carlone (Calendar Item #12) from 9/24/2018

18-98. Report on the recognition of National Energy Awareness Month, as a means of highlighting the importance of achieving the goals set forth in the Net Zero Action Plan.  See Mgr #8
Vice Mayor Devereux, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Zondervan (O-1) from 9/24/2018

18-99. Report on the creation and implementation of a survey or other feedback mechanism for individuals who have been in contact with the Human Rights Commission.
Councillor Siddiqui, Councillor Simmons, Councillor Mallon (O-2) from 9/24/2018

18-100. Report on taking all possible immediate actions to preserve and restore Linear Park.
Councillor Zondervan, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Siddiqui, Councillor Kelley (O-3) from 9/24/2018

18-101. Report on identifying ways to raise awareness about the prevalence of food allergies and decrease the level of risk posed by food remnants left in public parks and playgrounds.
Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Mallon, Councillor Carlone (O-1) from 10/1/2018

18-102. Report on the potential of utilizing the Icelandic crosswalk design in an intersection in East Cambridge.  See Mgr #6
Councillor Toomey (O-4) from 10/1/2018

18-103. Report on seeking a formal response from CVS as it relates to a racial profiling incident.
Councillor Simmons (O-6) from 10/1/2018

18-104. Report on a list of streets where it is recommended that the speed be reduced to 20 MPH.
Vice Mayor Devereux (O-10) from 10/1/2018

18-105. Report on the feasibility of placing a condition in the public bidding documents prohibiting municipal contractors from displaying any signage other than company markers and contact information on vehicles.
Councillor Siddiqui, Mayor McGovern, Vice Mayor Devereux (O-1) from 10/15/2018

18-106. Report on celebrating National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend in October of 2019 by scheduling a commemoration ceremony and lighting up City Hall and individual firehouses.
Councillor Mallon, Mayor McGovern (O-2) from 10/15/2018

18-107. Report on prioritizing the Public Safety outreach measures in the FY20 budget.
Councillor Mallon, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Simmons (O-5) from 10/15/2018

18-108. Report on offering early voting in City Council and School Committee Elections.
Vice Mayor Devereux, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Siddiqui (O-1) from 10/29/2018

18-109. Report on the feasibility of fencing off an area on the North side of the Joan Lorentz park for a dog park or at another suitable location in Mid-Cambridge.
Councillor Mallon, Councillor Siddiqui (O-2) from 10/29/2018

18-110. Report on determining whether unisex bathrooms can be installed in City Hall, or whether existing bathrooms could be modified into unisex bathrooms.
Councillor Simmons, Vice Mayor Devereux, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Siddiqui (O-3) from 10/29/2018

18-111. Report on addressing the increase of TNC-associated vehicles stopping in the middle of streets and bicycle lanes.
Councillor Simmons (O-7) from 10/29/2018

18-112. Report on determining what measures would best serve to prevent vehicles from blocking the Fresh Pond Mall's driveway onto Alewife Brook Parkway.
Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Kelley (O-8) from 10/29/2018

18-113. Report on coordinating a walk down Rindge Avenue, covering at least from Haskell Street to Sherman Street, to analyze the congestion and intersections with interested residents to try to find mitigating solutions or to explain why mitigation may not be possible
Councillor Kelley, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Zondervan (O-12) from 10/29/2018

18-114. Report on opportunities and plans to increase signage or other communication efforts to help ensure that all users of Brattle Street between Eliot and Mason Streets understand the cyclists may be using Brattle Street in the opposite direction of prevailing motor vehicle traffic.
Councillor Kelley, Vice Mayor Devereux (O-14) from 10/29/2018

18-115. Report on the current status of the Surveillance Technology Ordinance and a date the City Council can expect an updated version of the proposed Ordinance.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Carlone (O-16) from 10/29/2018

18-116. Report on the current status of any City Hall renovation plans and a timeline of planned events.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Carlone, Councillor Toomey (O-17) from 10/29/2018

18-117. Report on using the best available salt substitutes and additives, and apply all other appropriate chloride reduction practices this winter in all areas where salt may be damaging trees, including but not limited to Linear Park.
Councillor Zondervan, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Carlone (O-18) from 10/29/2018

18-118. Report on funding additional City summer food sites and collaborate on creative and innovative ways to engage participants in programming that will increase the use of open food sites.
Councillor Mallon, Vice Mayor Devereux, Councillor Siddiqui (O-1) from 11/5/2018

18-119. Report on evaluating the existing capacity of fire stations in the Kendall Square area and whether a new fire station is needed, and if so, determining the feasibility of locating a plot of land for this use.
Councillor Mallon, Mayor McGovern, Councillor Toomey (O-2) from 11/5/2018

18-120. Report on rethinking the approach to Envision Cambridge including a fact sheet on the three zoning analyses during presentations to the community and focus the presentations on getting feedback and buy-in on the goals of all six Envision Cambridge Working Groups.
Councillor Zondervan, Vice Mayor Devereux (O-4) from 11/5/2018