Cambridge City Council meeting - September 10, 2012 - AGENDA

CITY MANAGERíS AGENDA
1. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, requesting that the City Council formally appropriate/allocate the Community Preservation Act (CPA) funds as follows:
1A. 80% of the FY2013 CPA Local Fund revenues ($5,600,000) allocated to Affordable Housing and appropriated to the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust; [7-2; Kelley, Toomey NO]
1B. 10% of FY2013 CPA Local Fund revenues ($700,000) allocated to Historic Preservation; [9-0]
1C. 10% of FY2013 CPA Local Fund revenues ($700,000) allocated to Open Space; [8-1; vanBeuzekom NO]
2A. 80% of FY2012 State Match revenues ($1,320,000) allocated to Affordable Housing and appropriated to the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust; [7-2; Kelley, Toomey NO]
2B. 10% of FY2012 State Match revenues ($165,000) allocated to Historic Preservation; [9-0]
2C. 10% of FY2012 State Match revenues ($165,000) allocated to Open Space; [8-1; vanBeuzekom NO]
3A. 80% of the Fund Balance ($800,000) allocated to Affordable Housing and appropriated to the Affordable Housing Trust; [7-2; Kelley, Toomey NO]
3B. 10% of the Fund Balance ($100,000) allocated to Historic Preservation; [9-0]
3C. 10% of the Fund Balance ($100,000) allocated to Open Space; [9-0]
4A. Appropriate ($1,035,000) from the Open Space Reserve to the Public Investment Budget; and [8-1; vanBeuzekom NO]
5A. Appropriate ($7,500) from the Fund Balance the cost for the Community Preservation Coalition Membership Dues. [9-0]

September 10, 2012
To the Honorable, the City Council:

Listed below are the recommendations of the Community Preservation Act (CPA) Committee for FY2013. For additional information, please see attachments from CPA Committee Chair, Richard Rossi, dated 9/5/12.

It should be noted that the CPA public process this year began with a public meeting held on June 26, 2012 to solicit suggestions on CPA projects for FY13. Based on that meeting and other inputs, the CPA Committee was provided information on project funding requests without any recommendation for percentage allocations of anticipated CPA funds. A public hearing was held on August 28, 2012 to solicit recommendations from the public on percentage allocations and to review suggested projects. The CPA Committee also received several petitions, letters and e-mails from the public relative to CPA recommendations. The CPA Committee, on September 4, 2012, unanimously voted for an allocation of 80% for Affordable Housing, 10% for Historical Preservation Projects and 10% for Open Space Projects, and voted to transfer funds from the Open Space Reserve Fund for appropriation to Public Investment Fund projects.

In accordance with the CPA Committee's recommendations, I am requesting that the City Council appropriate CPA funds raised by the City's FY2013 CPA surcharge, the FY2012 state match funds received in FY2013, and a portion of existing CPA fund balance and funds currently in the Open Space Reserve Fund.

For this appropriation, it is estimated that the net local receipts from the CPA surcharge for FY2013 will total $7,000,000, added to an anticipated state match of approximately $1,650,000 and an additional $1,000,000 from CPA Fund Balance. Additionally, $1,035,000 from the Open Space Reserve Fund balance is being recommended for appropriation and $7,500 from CPA Fund Balance for annual membership to the Community Preservation Coalition. On September 4, 2012 the CPA Committee made recommendations for allocation of these FY13 funds. By unanimous votes, the CPA Committee recommended to the City Council, through the City Manager, that the CPA funds be allocated and appropriated as follows:

Recommended FY 2013 Allocation and Appropriation of CPA Funds

VOTE 1: Fiscal Year 2013 Local Funds ($7,000,000)

Vote 1A
80% of FY2013 CPA Local Fund revenues ($5,600,000) allocated to Affordable Housing and appropriated to the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust.

Vote 1B
10% of FY2013 CPA Local Fund revenues ($700,000) allocated to Historic Preservation as follows:
1. $500,000 appropriated to the Historic Preservation Grants program;
2. $195,000 appropriated to City Hall, Replace exterior window sills; and
3. $5,000 appropriated to City Engineer, Document Scanning.

Vote 1C
10% of FY2013 CPA Local Fund revenues ($700,000) allocated to Open Space as follows:
1. $400,000 appropriated to Hurley Playground; and
2. $300,000 appropriated to Replacement of Basketball and Tennis Courts.

VOTE 2: Fiscal Year 2012 State Funds [received in FY13] ($1,650,000)

Vote 2A
80% of FY2012 State Match revenues ($1,320,000) allocated to Affordable Housing and appropriated to the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust.

Vote 2B
10% of FY2012 State Match revenues ($165,000) allocated to Historic Preservation as follows:
1. $40,000 appropriated to City Hall Public Area woodwork restoration;
2. $21,000 appropriated to Cpl. Burns Shelter, design and testing;
3. $11,000 appropriated to Fire HQ door replacement;
4. $28,000 appropriated to Cambridge Cemetery, stairs and enclosures;
5. $35,000 appropriated to Old Burying Ground, headstone and tomb restoration;
6. $10,000 appropriated to City Engineering, Document Scanning; and
7. $20,000 appropriated to Historic Marker Prototype Design.

Vote 2C
10% of FY2012 State Match revenues ($165,000) allocated to Open Space as follows:
1. $165,000 appropriated to Elm/ Hampshire Plaza, Bishop Allen /Main St. Park.

VOTE 3: CPA Fund Balance ($1,000,000)

Vote 3A
80% of the Fund Balance ($800,000) allocated to Affordable Housing and appropriated to the Affordable Housing Trust.

Vote 3B
10% of the Fund Balance ($100,000) allocated to Historic Preservation as follows:
1. $10,000 appropriated to Fresh Pond intake structure;
2. $70,000 appropriated to City Clerk's Vault, Phase 2; and
3. $20,000 appropriated to Historic Marker Prototype Design.

Vote 3C
10% of the Fund Balance ($100,000) allocated to Open Space as follows:
1. $100,000 appropriated to Pacific Street/ Passive Area and Dog Park.

VOTE 4: Open Space Reserves ($1,035,000)
The following appropriation requests represent major initiatives to utilize CPA Open Space Reserve Fund based on a process to identify eligible open space projects that meet CPA criteria.

VOTE 4A
Appropriate $1,035,000 from the Open Space Reserve to the Public Investment Budget as follows:
1. $155,000 from the Open Space Reserve to the Public Investment Fund for Elm/Hampshire Plaza, Bishop Allen/ Main St. Park;
2. $250,000 from the Open Space Reserve to the Public Investment Fund for the purchase of railroad rights of way;
3. $230,000 from the Open Space Reserve to the Public Investment Fund for Replacement of Basketball and Tennis Courts;
4. $300,000 from the Open Space Reserve to the Public Investment Fund for Replacement of School Playgrounds; and
5. $100,000 from the Open Space Reserve to the Public Investment Fund for Community Gardens.

VOTE 5: CPA Fund Balance - Administration ($7,500)

Vote 5A
1. $7,500 appropriated to Administrative Cost for Community Preservation Coalition Membership Dues.

Table 1. Summary of Recommended Appropriations by Expenditure Type

CPA Category/ Project FY13 Total Amount Allocated/
Appropriate All Sources
Affordable Housing Trust $7,720,000
   
Historical Preservation  
-Historical Preservation Grants $500,000
-City Hall, Public Area Restoration 40,000
-City Hall, Window Sill Replacement Project 195,000
-Cpl. Burns Shelter, Design and Testing 21,000
-Fire HQ Door Replacement 11,000
-Fresh Pond Intake Structure 10,000
-Cambridge Cemetery Restoration (granite stairs and enclosures) 28,000
-Old Burying Ground, Headstone and Tomb Restoration 35,000
-City Clerk's Vaults, Phase 2 70,000
-City Engineer, Document Scanning 15,000
-Historic Marker Prototype Design 40,000
Subtotal (Historical) $965,000
   
Open Space  
-Hurley Playground Renovations $400,000
-Elm/ Hampshire Plaza, Bishop Allen/ Main St. Park Improvements 320,000
-Pacific St/ Passive area and Dog Park Enhancements 100,000
-Purchase of Railroad Rights of Way 250,000
-Replacement of Basketball and Tennis Courts 530,000
-Replacement of School Playgrounds 300,000
-Community Garden Expansion and Enhancements 100,000
Subtotal (Open Space) $2,000,000
Administrative/ Community Preservation Coalition $7,500
Total: $10,692,500

Table 2. Summary of Recommended Appropriations by Funding Source

FY2013
Local Funds ($7,000,000)
FY2012 State Match
($1,650,000)
CPA Fund Balance
($1,000,000)
Open Space Reserve
($1,035,000)
FY2013 Total
($10,685,000)
 
Affordable Housing Trust $5,600,000 $1,320,000 $800,000   $7,720,000
Historic Preservation Projects $700,000 $165,000 $100,000   $965,000
Open Space Projects $700,000 $165,000 $100,000 $1,035,000 $2,000,000
Admin./Community Preservation Coalition Membership Dues     $7,500   $7,500
Total $7,000,000 $1,650,000 $1,007,500 $1,035,000 10,692,500

Very truly yours, Robert W. Healy, City Manager

2. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appointment of the following person as a Constable (Without Power) for a term of three years, effective Jan 1, 2012: Antonio Ortiz, Abington, MA

3. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Numbers 12-76 and 12-77, regarding discussion on violence and the youth perspective in reaction to the Willow Street shooting.

4. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, regarding Awaiting Report Item Number 12-94, regarding a report on PARK(ing) Day 2012.

5. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 12-93, regarding a report on the feasibility of supporting the concept of human-powered bicycle cabs.

6. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to a landmark designation report and recommendation from the Historical Commission on the Arthur Astor Carey House located at 28 Fayerweather Street.

7. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Civic Education Grant for $115,753 funded by the Adult and Community Learning Services through the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($109,487), to the Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($6,020), and to the Travel and Training account ($246) which will support ESOL/Civic Education classes provided by the Community Learning Center (CLC).

8. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Cambridge Housing Authority Computer grant received from the Cambridge Housing Authority in the amount of $47,646 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($45,660) and to the Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($1,986) which will allow the Community Learning Center to provide computer classes for Cambridge Housing Authority residents at the Roosevelt Towers, Jefferson Park and at 119 Windsor Street.

9. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of $15,500 for the Center for Families program funded by the Children's Trust Fund to the Department of Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account and will be used by the Center for Families to support family programs targeting parents of children up to six years, which include a variety of family support and parent education programs and resources.

10. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Men's Health Grant in the amount of $500 funded by Cambridge Public Health Commission to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account and will be used to provide activities to promote senior men's health including the prevention and control of diabetes.

11. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Metro North Regional Employment Board (MNREB) grant received from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Adult and Community Learning Services through MNREB in the amount of $144,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($137,791) and to the Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($6,209) which funds a portion of our core English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL) and Adult Basic Education services at the Community Learning Center as well as an integrated ESOL/Math course for immigrants who are interested in training to be nurse assistants or home health aides.

12. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance grant funded by the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) in the amount of $88,979 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($84,979) and to the Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($4,000) which will be used for costs related to the Carey Men's Transitional Program operated by the Multi-Service Center.

13. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the transfer of funds of the STOP Act grant awarded from the Substance and Mental Health Services Administration Supportive Housing Program grant in the amount of $4,570 from the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account which will be used to support contracted services through the Cambridge Health Department that is responsible for implementing the Reality Check Campaign with support from the Cambridge Prevention Coalition.

14. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Universal Pre-Kindergarten (UPK) grant for the Morse Preschool in the amount of $12,035 received from the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salaries and Wages account ($2,425) and to the Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($9,610) and will be used to support staff professional development, the purchase of supplies to improve classroom instruction, and parent outreach efforts including food and childcare.

15. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Universal Pre-Kindergarten (UPK) grant for the Peabody Preschool in the amount of $15,045 received from the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salaries and Wages account ($2,665) and to the Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($12,380) and will be used to support staff trainings, staff professional development, the purchase of supplies to improve classroom instruction and parent outreach efforts including food and childcare.

16. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 12-101, regarding a report on how the goals formed by the Economic Development, Training and Employment Committee last term have been translated into practice in the City Administration.

17. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 12-100, regarding a report on whether emails to Councillors either through the City email or to their personal accounts may be shared with the general public.

Message from Nancy E. Glowa, Acting City Solicitor:

The City Council has asked whether "e-mails to both Council@Cambridgema.gov and to individual Councillors, at both their personal and City e-mails, may be shared with the general public and what, if any, redaction of personal information should be done prior to such sharing…." E-mails are analyzed under the Public Records Law like any document. Therefore, any e-mail sent or received by a City Councillor is a public record that may be disclosed, unless the information in it falls within one or more exemptions found in the law. G.L.c.4, §7(26). If the e-mail is a non-exempt public record, the subjective expectation of privacy of the sender will not insulate the e-mail from disclosure. There are many types of exempt information that could be contained in e-mails that should be redacted prior to disclosure, such as: medical information about an individual; dates of birth; Social Security numbers; bank account information; student information; City employee personnel information; law enforcement investigatory information; to name a few. There are many statutes that exempt specific types of information from disclosure – 58 such statutes are listed on the last three pages of "A Guide to the Massachusetts Public Records Law" published by the Secretary of the Commonwealth. Those statutes are in addition to the 19 exemptions listed in G.L.c.4, §7(26). The second clause of Exemption (c) of G.L.c.4, §7(26) exempts information "relating to a specifically named individual, the disclosure of which may constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy." This exemption has been interpreted to require a balancing test in its application on a case-by-case basis between the privacy interest at stake in the information at issue and the public interest in disclosure. Due to the multitude and complexity of possible exemptions, reviewing records prior to disclosure for exempt information is usually done by, or in consultation with, the Law Department.

E-mails received by a Councillor in his/her official capacity would usually be a public record that may be disclosed after review for exempt information. Because the Council@Cambridgema.gov address is clearly an official address for the City Council, e-mails sent to it clearly fall within the definition of a public record, that is, a communication received by a public officer. The same general rule would apply to e-mails sent to a City Councillor's personal address. If the e-mails were sent to the City Councillor's personal e-mail address about matters within his/her official capacity, they are probably public records. Obviously, there would be a significant amount of e-mail at a Councillor's personal address that would not relate to his/her status as a public officer which would not be public record.

Very truly yours, Nancy E. Glowa

CHARTER RIGHT
1. That the City Council hereby submits the following change to the City's Zoning Ordinance for consideration, referral to the Planning Board and Ordinance Committee and ordination- to add a footnote #15 to Table 6.36.1(a) column III (Open Space, Res A-1, A-2, Res B) stating: "Where a single dwelling unit is located on a private way and where said private way would provide adequate parking for at least one car, with the written notice from the Fire Department that emergency access would not be impaired, the requirement for off street parking is waived." [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on Order Number Nineteen of July 30, 2012.]
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee on Aug 13, 2012 per Chapter 40A

2. That the City Manager is requested to work with the appropriate City departments to expand enforcement of the prohibition on Cambridge pick-ups by non-Cambridge cabs not specifically called to Cambridge. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Decker on Order Number Thirty-three of July 30, 2012.]
Placed on file under Rule 19 - no action taken

ON THE TABLE
3. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 12-09, regarding a report on the use of coal and on Cambridge becoming coal-free. [City Manager Agenda Number One of Mar 5, 2012 Placed on Table on motion of Vice Mayor Simmons on Mar 5, 2012.]

4. Urge greater cooperation from the Cambridge Housing Authority to better serve the people of Cambridge. [Order Number Two of Apr 9, 2012 Placed on Table on motion of Vice Mayor Simmons on Apr 9, 2012.]

5. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Community Development Department and other relevant departments in order to present to the City Council a map of Cambridge that shows, by location and by date, all of the areas where construction is and will be taking place over the coming decade. [Order Number Four of Apr 9, 2012 Placed on Table on motion of Councillor Toomey on Apr 9, 2012.]

6. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item No. 12-28, regarding temporary ramps and obstructions in construction zones. [City Manager Agenda Number Eight of Apr 23, 2012 Placed on Table on motion of Councillor Kelley on Apr 23, 2012.]

7. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 12-35, which requests a report on whether there were any public safety officers that falsified their emergency medical training re-certification while employed by the City of Cambridge. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Toomey on City Manager Agenda Number Two of May 21, 2012. Placed on Table on motion of Councillor Toomey on June 4, 2012.]

8. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 12-63 regarding a report on safety issues at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Vassar Street. [City Manager Number Twenty-three of July 30, 2012 Placed on Table on motion of Councillor Kelley on July 30, 2012.]

9. That the City Manager is requested to confer with relevant City staff and report back to the City Council on whether a tagging program could be implemented to notify owners of bicycles that have been removed from sign posts by the Department of Public Works and contact information for retrieval of said bicycle. [Order Number Fourteen of July 30, 2012 Placed on Table on motion of Councillor vanBeuzekom on July 30, 2012. Councillor Toomey recorded in the negative on Tabling.]

UNFINISHED BUSINESS
10. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to an order requesting the appropriation and authorization to borrow $81,500,000 to provide funds for architectural design, construction and other associated costs of the King School project. The question comes on adoption on or after Aug 13, 2012.
Loan Order adopted 9-0

APPLICATIONS AND PETITIONS
1. An application was received from Dickson Hardware requesting permission for a sign at the premises numbered 26 Brattle Street. Approval has been received from Inspectional Services, Department of Public Works, Community Development, Historical Commission and abutters.

2. An application was received from LaVoie Strategic Communications Group requesting permission for an awning at the premises numbered 201 Broadway. Approval has been received from Inspectional Services, Department of Public Works, Community Development and abutter.

3. An application was received from Chipotle Mexican Grill requesting permission for a blade sign at the premises numbered 600 Massachusetts Avenue. Approval has been received from Inspectional Services, Department of Public Works, Community Development and abutters.

4. An application was received from Peter Lee, Young Investments, LLC requesting permission for a curb cut at the premises numbered 97-99 Harvey Street; said petition has received approval from Inspectional Services, Traffic, Parking and Transportation, Historical Commission and Public Works with conditions. No response has been received from the neighborhood association.
Tabled - Kelley

5. An application was received from Peter Lee, Young Investments, LLC requesting permission for a curb cut at the premises numbered 127-135 Harvey Street; said petition has received approval from Inspectional Services, Traffic, Parking and Transportation, Historical Commission and Public Works with conditions. No response has been received from the neighborhood association.
Tabled - Kelley

COMMUNICATIONS
1. A communication was received from the family of John Milmore transmitting how deeply grateful they are for the beautiful resolution of sympathy.

2. A communication was received from Peter Valentine, 37 Brookline Street regarding building code violations at 180 Franklin Street.

3. A communication was received from Peter Valentine, 37 Brookline Street regarding details of the need for open space for the people in University Park.

4. A communication was received from Stephen H. Kaiser, 191 Hamilton Street regarding City Council awareness of Legal Problems at the Redevelopment Authority.

5. A communication was received from L. Rafael Reif, President, Massachusetts of Technology transmitting appreciation for the resolution recognizing his appointment to the presidency of MIT.

6. A communication was received from State Senator William N. Brownsberger transmitting thanks for forwarding the resolution regarding double utility poles.

7. A communication was received from State Senator William N. Brownsberger transmitting thanks for forwarding the resolution requesting the Legislature and the Governor address the operating and capital maintenance issues affecting the transportation infrastructure in Massachusetts.

8. A communication was received from Hasson J. Rashid regarding establishing a municipal office of Muslim Chaplaincy at City Hall.

9. A communication was received from Bill Forster, 244 Lexington Avenue regarding the small pedestrian islands being placed in the middle of streets.


10. Report received regarding a grant awarded to the Police Department to complete a Community Safety Audit Project.

11. A communication was received from Quinton Y. Zondervan, President, Green Cambridge transmitting concerns about the renovations to Martin Luther King School.

12. A communication was received from Erik Thorkildsen on behalf of Green Cambridge relating to carbon accounting for the Martin Luther King School Renovation and Construction Design Options.


RESOLUTIONS
1. Resolution on the death of Luis A. Feliciano.   Councillor Toomey

2. Resolution on the death of Joseph M. Walsh.   Councillor Toomey

3. Resolution on the death of Marguerite "Rita" (Peters) Parilla.   Councillor Toomey

4. Resolution on the death of Stephen A. Dorsey.   Councillor Maher

5. Resolution on the death of June M. Chiampa.   Councillor Maher

6. Resolution on the death of Irene M. (Lowe) McMaster.   Councillor Maher

7. Resolution on the death of Robert F. Marchant.   Councillor Maher

8. Resolution on the death of Osvalda "Ozzie" Capotosto.   Councillor Toomey

9. Resolution on the death of Thomas F. Sweeney, Jr.   Councillor Maher

10. Resolution on the death of Anna W. Farino.   Councillor Maher

11. Resolution on the death of Charles L. Stead, Sr.   Councillor Maher, Mayor Davis, Vice Mayor Simmons

12. Resolution on the death of Anna M. Cronin.   Councillor Maher

13. Congratulating the Historical Commission for being featured on Buzzfeed.com as one of the best historical collections.   Councillor Toomey

14. Resolution on the death of Richard "Richie" Fallon.   Councillor Maher

15. Congratulations to Scott McDonough for completing the Air Force Explosive Ordinance Disposal School.   Councillor Toomey

16. Wishing Barbara Hebert a speedy recovery.   Vice Mayor Simmons

17. Wishing Reverend Irene Munroe a speedy recovery.   Vice Mayor Simmons

18. Congratulating Renae Grey on six months of improved health.   Vice Mayor Simmons

19. Happy 80th Birthday wishes to Jacqueline Tynes.   Vice Mayor Simmons, Mayor Davis

20. Happy 60th Birthday to Esther Richards.   Vice Mayor Simmons

21. Resolution on the death of Lori A. Sciurca.   Councillor Toomey

22. Resolution on the death of Arvida J. Shilo.   Councillor Toomey

23. Resolution on the death of Michael A. Aufiero.   Councillor Toomey

24. Resolution on the death of Hortense A. Townsend.   Councillor Reeves

25. Retirement of Daniel Hogan from the Cambridge Police Department.   Mayor Davis

26. Retirement of David Holland from the Budget Department.   Mayor Davis

27. Retirement of Rosalind (Donna) Walton from the School Department.   Mayor Davis

28. Retirement of Robert K. Patterson from the Department of Public Works.   Mayor Davis

29. Resolution on the death of Annette M. (Audette) Geraigery.   Councillor Maher

30. Resolution on the death of John (Jason) Deneault.   Vice Mayor Simmons

31. Happy 4th Birthday wishes to Abby Walker.   Vice Mayor Simmons

32. Resolution on the death of Frank W. "Yakka" Yarasitis.   Councillor Toomey

33. Resolution on the death of Ruth F. (Gracey) Peltier.   Councillor Maher, Vice Mayor Simmons, Councillor Toomey

34. Resolution on the death of Stephen C. O'Connor.   Councillor Maher

35. Resolution on the death of Marie I. (Ferrand) Sousa.   Councillor Maher

36. Resolution on the death of Robert F. LeBlanc.   Councillor Toomey, Councillor Maher

37. Resolution on the death of Ann Teresa Sullivan.   Councillor Maher

38. Resolution on the death of Angelina Andrade (Chaves) Batista.   Councillor Toomey

39. Resolution on the death of James M. Saropoulos.   Councillor Toomey

40. Resolution on the death of Terri Ann (Mangano) Griffin.   Councillor Toomey

41. Resolution on the death of Aida T. Kalloch.   Councillor Toomey

42. Resolution on the death of Cecilia Jones De Clara Yakubu.   Councillor Toomey

43. Thanks to the Charles River Watershed Association for organizing a Fall clean-up along the Charles River in the new North Point Park on Oct 14, 2012.   Councillor Toomey

44. Congratulations to Nicole and Timothy Heidel on their recent wedding.   Councillor Toomey

45. Resolution on the death of Paul C. Tallon Sr.   Councillor Maher

46. Resolution on the death of Robert Richard Lukas.   Councillor Toomey

47. Welcome Dr. Felix Moesner to Cambridge and best wishes in his new position as Consul and Director of swissnex Boston.   Mayor Davis

48. Resolution on the death of Rose T. Feroleto.   Councillor Maher

49. Resolution on the death of Henrietta S. Attles, Ed.D.   Councillor Reeves, Vice Mayor Simmons, Mayor Davis

50. Wishing The Cambridge Homes a Happy 125th Anniversary.   Councillor Toomey

51. Congratulating Area Four on being named "Best Neighborhood Eats, Kendall Square" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

52. Congratulating Christopher's on being named "Best Neighborhood Eats, Porter Square" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

53. Congratulating Bondir on being named "Best Romantic, Upscale" restaurant by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

54. Congratulating East by Northeast on being named "Best Neighborhood Eats, Inman Square" restaurant by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

55. Congratulating Central Bottle on being named "Best Wine Shop" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

56. Congratulating Formaggio Kitchen on being named "Best Cheese Shop" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

57. Congratulating Finale on being named "Best Whoopie Pie" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

58. Congratulating Hungry Mother on being named "Best Southern" restaurant by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

59. Congratulating Oleana on being named "Best Middle Eastern" restaurant by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

60. Congratulating The Greek Corner on being named "Best Greek" restaurant by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

61. Congratulating Miracle of Science on being named "Best Neighborhood Eats, Central Square" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

62. Congratulating Phoenix Landing on being named "Best Bar, Sports" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

63. Congratulating Rialto on being named "Best Italian, Upscale" restaurant by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

64. Congratulating Salts on being named "Best Bistro" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

65. Congratulating Savenor's, Cambridge on being named "Best Butcher Shop" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

66. Congratulating Russell House Tavern on being named "Best Neighborhood Eats, Harvard Square" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

67. Congratulating The Cambridge Center Rooftop Garden on receiving the "Best Secret Garden Award" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

68. Congratulating Jessica Scott, at Craigie on Main on being named "Best Chef, Pastry" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

69. Congratulating Toscanini's on being named "Best Ice Cream" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

70. Congratulating Veggie Galaxy on being named "Best Vegetarian" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

71. Congratulating T.W. Food on being named "Best Prix Fixe" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

72. Congratulating Flat Top Johnny's on being named "Best Pool Hall" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

73. Congratulating The Harvard Book Store on receiving the "Best Reading Series" award by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

74. Congratulating Kendall Square Cinema on being named "Best Cinema, National" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

75. Congratulating Brick and Mortar on receiving the "Best Shots with a Twist" award by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

76. Congratulating The Comedy Studio on being named "Best Club, Comedy" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

77. Congratulating Bike Tours of Cambridge on receiving the "Best Freebie" award by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

78. Congratulating Sasha Purpura on her new role as Executive Director of Food for Free.   Mayor Davis

79. Resolution on the death of John "Jackie" Collins.   Councillor Toomey

80. Congratulating Artist and Craftsman for being named "Best Art Supplies" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

81. Congratulating City Sports on being named "Best Clothing, Men's Fitness" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

82. Congratulating Dickson Brothers True Value on being named "Best Hardware" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

83. Congratulating Circle Furniture on being named "Best Furniture, One Stop Shopping" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

84. Congratulating The Coop, Harvard Square on being named "Best Books" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

85. Congratulating Drinkwater's on being named "Best Clothings, Men's Dressy" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

86. Congratulating Luggage World on being named "Best Luggage" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

87. Congratulating Marathon Sports on being named "Best Running Shop" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

88. Congratulating Raven Used Books on being named "Best Books, Used" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

89. Congratulating Lush on being named "Best Bath Products" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

90. Congratulating Mint Julep on being named "Best Clothing, Women's Casual" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

91. Congratulating Sephora on being named "Best Makeup" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

92. Congratulating Stellabella Toys on being named "Best Toys" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

93. Congratulating The Tannery on being named "Best Shoes, Men's" by Boston Magazine.   Mayor Davis

94. Thanking Mellissa Honeywood, Director of Food Services, the CPS food service staff and Dawn Olcott, School Nutritionist with the Cambridge Public Health Department for organizing Massachusetts Harvest for Students week.   Mayor Davis

95. Congratulating GeckoCap for being recognized as a Mass High Tech Company to follow in the Boston Business Journal.   Councillor Cheung

96. Welcoming MarketMeSuite to Cambridge and best wishes on their continued success.   Councillor Cheung

97. Congratulating Bon' App, Inc. for being recognized as a Mass High Tech Company to follow in the Boston Business Journal.   Councillor Cheung

98. Congratulating iQuartic for being recognized as a Mass High Tech Company to follow in the Boston Business Journal.   Councillor Cheung

99. Congratulating Mr. Meng on his appointment as Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University.   Councillor Cheung

100. Congratulating the organizers of the Festival of Dumplings for their excellent work.   Councillor Cheung

101. Congratulating ReDigi for being recognized as a Mass High Tech Company to follow in the Boston Business Journal.   Councillor Cheung

102. Congratulating ThriveHive for being recognized as a Mass High Tech Company to follow in the Boston Business Journal.   Councillor Cheung

103. Congratulating Visible Measures for being recognized as a Mass High Tech Company to follow in the Boston Business Journal.   Councillor Cheung

104. Thanks to the Cambridge Fire Department, Cambridge Emergency Communications and the Red Cross for their quick response and service to the victims of the fire and a speedy recovery to the injured firefighters of the Aug 23, 2012 fire.   Councillor Toomey, Councillor Maher, Councillor Decker

105. Happy 60th Birthday wishes to Ted Darling.   Councillor Toomey

106. Congratulations to Joe Kelley and Dorrie Fisher on their recent wedding.   Councillor Toomey

107. Condolences to the family of Lennox Chase, founder and co-treasurer of the Alliance of Cambridge Tenants.   Vice Mayor Simmons

108. Speedy recovery wishes to Dr. Edward Chase.   Vice Mayor Simmons

109. Speedy recovery wishes to Alan Young.   Vice Mayor Simmons

110. Congratulations to the Mount Auburn Cemetery for marking the recent one year anniversary of the "1831 Society."   Vice Mayor Simmons

111. Thanks to Cambridge Police Officer Michael Padua for his act of heroism in rescuing victims of the Aug 23, 2012 fire.   Councillor Maher, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Decker, Mayor Davis

112. Thanks to Cambridge Police Officer Nicholas Mochi for his act of heroism in rescuing victims of the Aug 23, 2012 fire.   Councillor Maher, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Decker, Mayor Davis

113. Thanks to Cambridge Police Officer Eugene Bustillo for his act of heroism in rescuing victims of the Aug 23, 2012 fire.   Councillor Maher, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Decker, Mayor Davis

114. Thanks to Cambridge Police Officer Brendan Pasco for his act of heroism in rescuing victims of the Aug 23, 2012 fire.   Councillor Maher, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Decker, Mayor Davis

115. Thanks to Cambridge Police Officer Steve Murphy for his act of heroism in rescuing victims of the Aug 23, 2012 fire.   Councillor Maher, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Decker, Mayor Davis

116. Thanks to Cambridge Police Officer Frank Lange for his act of heroism in rescuing victims of the Aug 23, 2012 fire.   Councillor Maher, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Decker, Mayor Davis

117. Congratulations and thanks to Kristen Von Hoffman for her work in creating "2012 Sustainability Year-In-Review."   Councillor vanBeuzekom

118. Retirement of Eileen Ginnetty from the Council on Aging.   Councillor Maher


119. Happy 80th Birthday wishes to Hodges Brown Sr.   Councillor Reeves

120. Speedy recovery wishes to Richard Bock.   Vice Mayor Simmons

121. Congratulations to Councillor Marjorie Decker for her overwhelming primary win and best wishes for a successful campaign for State Representative.   Mayor Davis, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Cheung, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Vice Mayor Simmons and Councillor vanBeuzekom.

122. Retirement of Jacqueline Hall from the School Department.   Mayor Davis

123. Congratulations to David M. Rogers for his primary victory for State Representative of the 24th Middlesex District.   Councillor Toomey

124. Congratulations to Terrence W. Kennedy for his primary win for Governor's Council.   Councillor Toomey

125. Congratulations to Maria Curtatone for her primary win for Southern Middlesex Registry of Deeds.   Councillor Toomey

126. Happy Birthday wishes to Janet Rose.   Councillor Toomey


ORDERS
1. That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Francis family to determine a suitable location on or near 237 Franklin Street for a suitable memorial for John Francis.   Vice Mayor Simmons

2. That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Philips family to determine a suitable location for a street corner dedication for David Philips.   Vice Mayor Simmons

3. That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Brooks family to determine a suitable location for a street corner dedication for former Cambridge Mayor William Brooks (1909-1910).   Vice Mayor Simmons

4. That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Kimbrough family to determine a suitable location for a street corner dedication for Leslie Kimbrough.   Vice Mayor Simmons

5. That the City Council go on record urging that funding for CASPAR, Inc. for FY2014 be preserved at current levels, if not increased, to ensure that the organization can continue providing the services this community has come to depend on for decades.   Vice Mayor Simmons

6. That the City Ordinance Committee resume discussing the outlines of a formal Community Benefits & Mitigation Plan for projects within the city with the goal of making a recommendation on a policy that the City Council can vote on by year's end.   Vice Mayor Simmons
Referred to Government Operations & Rules Committee - Reeves

7. That the City Council, City Manager, School Committee, and Superintendent of Schools become determined to find additional funding from the city for the continuation of the MIT/Wellesley Upward Bound program.   Councillor Reeves

8. That the Housing Committee review the City's inclusionary zoning policy, to explore the possibility and feasibility of increasing the percentage of affordable housing that must be included in any new development.   Vice Mayor Simmons

9. That the Dedication Committee review the request for a suitable location near the corner of Harvard Street and Hancock Street for a street corner dedication for Julia Bibbins.   Councillor vanBeuzekom

10. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Police Commissioner to determine a format that will accommodate the City Council and the victim's family for an update on the status of the Willow Street shooting in May.   Councillor Reeves

11. That the Government Operations and Rules Committee publish a schedule of meetings devoted to the City Manager selection process and issue periodic statements so that the public may be informed as to the chosen selection process and timeline for the upcoming appointment.   Councillor Reeves

12. That the City Council suggest that the Cambridge Housing Authority study and consider the feasibility and reasonableness of placing long-term affordable housing deed restrictions on developments such as Newtowne Court and Washington Elms so that these developments will always be dedicated long-term affordability housing areas.   Councillor Reeves

13. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Assistant City Manager of Community Development and report back to the City Council on how the City is facilitating affordable housing opportunities for middle class families.   Councillor Toomey
Amended

14. That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate parties and to report back with an estimate on how many Cambridge residents are working as part of organized labor on development projects in the City of Cambridge along with percentages of minority and women members and what sort of communication takes place with the Rindge School of Technical Arts and local Unions.   Councillor Toomey

15. That the City Council go on record agreeing that a minimum of 80% of mitigation funds should be distributed within the neighborhoods that are impacted by these projects.   Councillor Toomey
Referred to Government Operations & Rules Committee - Reeves

16. That the City Manager is requested to create an inventory of the vacant lots and derelict buildings throughout Cambridge that the city could potentially purchase to add to the city's open space inventory for other city uses.   Mayor Davis
Amended

17. That the City Manager is requested to report back to the City Council with information on the new parking arrangements in the vicinity of the former Longfellow School on Broadway as they relate to the operation at the school building and to work with the School Department and the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to minimize the impact on the neighborhood.   Councillor Toomey
Withdrawn

18. That the City Manager is requested to work with the Community Development Department to conduct a preliminary exploration of an east west bike path alongside the commuter rail line or along the old haul route and the rail line between Aberdeen Avenue and Park Street.   Councillor Cheung
Amended

19. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Mayor's office to ensure that that the city applies for the Cities of Service grant funding program.   Councillor Cheung

20. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to itemize all mitigation commitments throughout the city to be compiled into a single document.   Councillor Cheung

21. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Community Development Department to report back to the City Council on what strategies other cities have used to dissuade land-banking and what may be applicable in Cambridge.   Councillor Cheung

22. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Department of Public Works to look into the feasibility of creating a tree database in order to develop identification tags for trees to make it easier to report landscaping issues.   Councillor Cheung
Withdrawn

23. That the City Manager is requested to report back to the City Council on the status of 2 Mount Auburn Street.   Vice Mayor Simmons

24. That the City Manager communicate to the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department the resident's request that the city take strong measures to improve the pedestrian yield sign locations (on Western Ave.).   Councillor vanBeuzekom

25. That the City Manager is requested, together with city staff, to compile a report with specific data that compares the actual energy efficiency for the City Hall Annex to its projected energy efficiency, including energy production by the building's photovoltaic panels   Councillor vanBeuzekom

26. That the City Manager is requested to create a shaded area at the Main Library tot lot, possibly by means of solar canopies.   Mayor Davis

27. That the City Manager is requested to direct the appropriate city departments, including the Department of Public Health, to support and publicize Food Day/Food Week efforts.   Mayor Davis


28. That the City Manager is requested to instruct the Law Department to prepare the necessary language to create the Pathway Overlay District from the Charles River to the Cambridge/Somerville line.   Councillor Toomey


COMMITTEE REPORTS
1. A communication was received from Donna P. Lopez, Interim City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor David P. Maher, Chair of the Government Operations and Rules Committee, for a public meeting held on June 22, 2012 to have an initial discussion with the City Manager to develop a comprehensive short and long term succession plan.

2. A communication was received from Donna P. Lopez, Interim City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Timothy J. Toomey, Chair of the Economic Development, Training and Employment Committee for a public meeting held on Aug 6, 2012 to receive an overview from the Community Development Department of the Grand Junction Rail with the Trail (RWT) Feasibility Study of 2006 and to discuss actions the City can make towards its construction.

3. A communication was received from Donna P. Lopez, Interim City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom, Chair of the Transportation, Traffic and Parking Committee, for a public meeting held on May 31, 2012 to discuss the Parking and Transportation Demand Management Ordinance (PTDM); how the ordinance works for property owners who comply with the PTDM Ordinance; the specific tactics used to reduce Single Occupancy Vehicles (SOVs) and whether the PTDM Ordinance merits expansion to better serve and inform decision making in the current development boom.

4. A communication was received from Savitri Khalsa, transmitting a report from Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom, Chair of the Environment Committee for a public meeting held on Aug 8, 2012 to discuss implementation of a plan for separate trash or recycling curbside pickup for small businesses along existing curbside routes.

HEARING SCHEDULE
Mon, Sept 10
5:00pm   Special Presentation of the Community Safety Audit and Photovoice Exhibit  (Sullivan Chamber)
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, Sept 19
9:00am   The Government Operations and Rules Committee will conduct a public meeting to continue discussion to develop a hiring process for the position of City Manager.  (Ackermann Room)

Mon, Sept 24
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 1
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)
6:30pm   The City Council will conduct a public hearing to discuss the property tax rate classification.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, Oct 3
4:00pm   The Ordinance Committee will conduct a public hearing on an amendment by the City Council to the Zoning Ordinance to add a footnote #15 to Table 6.36.1(a) column III (Open Space, Res A-1, A-2, Res B) stating: "Where a single dwelling unit is located on a private way and where said private way would provide adequate parking for at least one car, with the written notice from the Fire Department that emergency access would not be impaired, the requirement for off street parking is waived." This hearing to be televised.  (Sullivan Chamber)
4:30pm   The Ordinance Committee will conduct a public hearing on a zoning petition by Susan Yanow, et al. to amend the Zoning Map of the City of Cambridge in the following areas: Rezone from the existing Business A to Business A-1 the areas bounded by Windsor and Main Streets and Bishop Allen Drive; and Columbia Street, Bishop Allen Drive, Prospect and Norfolk Streets; Rezone from the existing Business B and Cambridgeport Revitalization Development District (CRDD) to a proposed new district Business B-3 in the area bounded by Green, Landsdowne, Magazine, and Prospect Streets and Massachusetts Avenue; Define as a protected neighborhood zone the area zoned Residence C-1 and bounded by Portland, Main and Windsor Streets and a line 120 feet north of and parallel to Main Street; Rezone the areas currently identified as Municipal Parking Lots numbered 4, 5, and 6 along Bishop Allen Drive to a proposed new Municipal Parking District (MP). This district would not allow construction of any permanent buildings except for public purposes such as performances and farmer's markets and would require a minimum of 7.25% of any lot to be landscaped. This hearing to be televised.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 15
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 22
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Wed, Oct 24
4:00pm   The Ordinance Committee will conduct a public hearing on the petition of the Planning Board to amend the Zoning Map for an area along North Massachusetts Avenue in the vicinity of Trolley Square and Linear Park from Business A-2 to Residence C-2B This hearing to be televised.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 29
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 5
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 19
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 26
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 3
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 10
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 17
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 31
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Jan 7
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Jan 14
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Jan 28
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Feb 4
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Feb 11
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Feb 25
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 4
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 11
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 18
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Mar 25
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

TEXT OF ORDERS
O-1     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
ORDERED: That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Francis family to determine a suitable location on or near 237 Franklin Street for a suitable memorial for John Francis; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward this order to the Dedication Committee for review.

O-2     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
ORDERED: That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Philips family to determine a suitable location for a street corner dedication for David Philips; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward this order to the Dedication Committee for review.

O-3     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
ORDERED: That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Brooks family to determine a suitable location for a street corner dedication for former Cambridge Mayor William Brooks (1909-1910); and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward this order to the Dedication Committee for review.

O-4     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
ORDERED: That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Kimbrough family to determine a suitable location for a street corner dedication for Leslie Kimbrough; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward this order to the Dedication Committee for review.

O-5     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
WHEREAS: CASPAR, Inc. provides an essential service for the Cambridge community, offering a continuum of care for those individuals struggling with substance abuse, homelessness, mental illness, and other chronic conditions that might otherwise lead to trips to the emergency room or to the courts; and
WHEREAS: The organization has been serving this vulnerable population since its founding in 1970, and over the past year alone, CASPAR has conducted critical outreach to over 350 homeless individuals, providing life-saving services to them; and
WHEREAS: CASPAR has also worked with over 150 at-risk youth, including those who are homeless, those who have substance-abuse issues, and those enrolled in local high schools; and
WHEREAS: CASPAR annually caters to over 1,300 individuals via their Drop-In Center, which connects these people with the information and support they need to sustain their recovery; and
WHEREAS: CASPAR is one of only two "wet" shelters in state and the only one in the Cambridge area and county, meaning they are willing and able to admit those who are currently intoxicated or under the influence. Absent this wet shelter that houses 110 individuals each night, such individuals would be forced to be admitted to the local hospitals (severely straining an already stressed system) or go back to living in the streets; and
WHEREAS: CASPAR has proven to be the vital difference in the lives of so many people, helping to lift, sustain, and nurture those who are among the most vulnerable among us, and it is absolutely essential that it continue receiving the necessary funding from the federal, state, and city levels, and from the private foundations that allocate money for it each year; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Council go on record urging that funding for CASPAR, Inc. for FY2014 be preserved at current levels, if not increased, to ensure that the organization can continue providing the services this community has come to depend on for decades; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward suitable copies of this resolution to Governor Deval Patrick; Chris Norris, Executive Director at the Metropolitan Boston Housing Partnership; Barbara G. Fields, Administrator of HUD Boston Regional Office; Kevin Burke, FEMA Massachusetts Office; Secretary JudyAnn Bigby, MD, Secretary of the Massachusetts Department of Health & Human Services; and Commissioner John Auerbach, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, on behalf of the entire City Council.

O-6     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
WHEREAS: The past several months have been filled with passionate deliberation over projects that will have long-term ramifications upon Central Square and Kendall Square; and
WHEREAS: The City Council has been in negotiations with each developer on a case-by-case basis in discussing potential concessions and community mitigation payments. While past experiences have served as a helpful reference point, there has not been any master plan guiding the City Council during these discussions and negotiations; and
WHEREAS: As recently as 2011, the City Council has discussed the merits of adopting a formal, comprehensive Community Benefits & Mitigation Plan, which would provide both the City Council and all potential developers a clear expectation, at the outset of any project, of what concessions and mitigation packages are appropriate and beneficial for the City; and
WHEREAS: Having that shared understanding at the outset of any project would preclude the need for the kinds of individualized negotiations that we have seen in the cases of the Central Square and Kendall Square projects. This would save time, effort, and would ensure that the City get the very best deal for its citizens in all projects going forward; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Ordinance Committee resume discussing the outlines of a formal Community Benefits & Mitigation Plan, with the goal of making a recommendation on a policy that the City Council can vote on by year's end; and be it further
ORDERED: That this matter be referred to the Ordinance Committee.

O-7     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR REEVES
WHEREAS: It has come to the Cambridge City Council's attention that the federal funding for the MIT/Wellesley Upward Bound program ended in August 2012. This program is more than 20 years old and was fiercely supported by the late Senator Edward M. Kennedy; and
WHEREAS: The MIT/Wellesley Upward Bound program is in extreme danger of closing due to lack of this funding from the federal government; and
WHEREAS: The MIT/Wellesley Upward Bound program serves and motivates 75 high school students in the Cambridge area of the low-income background and or first generation high school students who want to excel academically not just in high school, but also in college. The program is a year round program with a summer residency component at Wellesley College; and
WHEREAS: The dedicated participants of the MIT/Wellesley Upward Bound care deeply about their program as shown in excerpts of from letters such as: "Without this program, I don't know where I would be academically and socially," and "We come here and join a family like community. We eat together, we spend our days together, we sleep together, under the same roof all day." and
WHEREAS: The participants of the MIT/Wellesley Upward Bound program are extremely worried about their program's future as displayed in excerpts from letters written by present participants of the program such as: "All I ask is that we get back our funding, enough to keep this program running for years and years after this...every kid deserves a chance to have a great future, and some kids need a little more help with that than others," and "If this program is going to be cut off, my hopes and dreams are going to be cut off."; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Council, City Manager, School Committee, and Superintendent of Schools become determined to find additional funding from the city for the continuation of the MIT/Wellesley Upward Bound program.

O-8     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
ORDERED: That the Housing Committee review the City's inclusionary zoning policy, to explore the possibility and feasibility of increasing the percentage of affordable housing that must be included in any new development; and be it further
ORDERED: That this matter be referred to the Housing Committee.

O-9     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR VANBEUZEKOM
ORDERED: That the Executive Assistant to the City Council confer with the Bibbins family to determine a suitable location near the corner of Harvard Street and Hancock Street for a street corner dedication for Julia Bibbins; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward this order to the Dedication Committee for review.

O-10     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR REEVES
WHEREAS: In May 2012, a 16 year old girl, Charlene D. Holmes, was murdered in the City of Cambridge; and
WHEREAS: There has not been a police department report or news update to the current status of efforts to find those responsible for this reprehensive crime; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Police Commissioner to determine a format that will accommodate the City Council and the family for an update on this crime. The public needs to know what is being done to solve this crime and bring the perpetuator to justice.

O-11     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR REEVES
WHEREAS: The most important administrative task for the City Council under the Plan E form of government is to hire a City Manager; and
WHEREAS: The current City Manager, Robert Healy, has announced his intention to retire at the end of this fiscal year; and
WHEREAS: The City Council Government Operations and Rules Committee has been tasked with defining the process and schedule whereby a successor will be chosen; now therefore be it
RESOLVED: That the Government Operations and Rules Committee publish a schedule of meetings devoted to the City Manager selection process and issue periodic statements so that the public may be informed as to the chosen selection process and timeline for the upcoming appointment.

O-12     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR REEVES
WHEREAS: The preservation of existing affordable housing in Cambridge is of paramount importance; and
WHEREAS: The Cambridge Housing Authority (CHA) owns the most significant portfolio of the existing affordable housing; and
WHEREAS: Area IV residents in CHA housing, particularly those living in Newtowne Court and in Washington Elms, have become concerned about the long-term affordability and future of these developments; and
WHEREAS: It may be appropriate for the CHA, as a long-term affordability strategy, to consider several means of assuring the permanent affordability of CHA units; now therefore be it
RESOLVED: That the City Council suggest that the CHA study and consider the feasibility and reasonableness of placing long-term affordable housing deed restrictions on developments such as Newtowne Court and Washington Elms so that these developments will always be dedicated long-term affordability housing areas.

O-13     Sept 10, 2012  Amended
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: With increasing property values in the City of Cambridge, it is increasingly hard to maintain middle class housing within the city; and
WHEREAS: The City of Cambridge makes many efforts to find and maintain affordable housing options within the city for those who are income eligible; and
WHEREAS: Many times the middle class families do not fall within the range of income required for the affordable units; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Assistant City Manager of Community Development and report back to the City Council on how the City is facilitating affordable housing opportunities for middle class families; and be it further
ORDERED: That this matter be referred to the Housing Committee.

O-14     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: Union Labor plays a key role in the many development projects throughout the City of Cambridge; and
WHEREAS: The projects bring many new jobs to the City of Cambridge and Cambridge residents should benefit; and
WHEREAS: It is unclear how many union members working on these projects are Cambridge residents; and
WHEREAS: The Rindge School Technical Arts is a great place for Unions to engage Cambridge residents interested in the trades; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate parties and to report back with an estimate on how many Cambridge residents are working as part of organized labor on development projects in the City of Cambridge along with percentages of minority and women members; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the School Superintendent and report back on what sort of communication takes place with the Rindge School of Technical Arts and local Unions.

O-15     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: The City Council has heard from the residents in neighborhoods abutting major development proposals that mitigation from these projects should directly benefit the neighborhood that is absorbing the impact of these projects; now therefore be it
RESOLVED: That the City Council go on record agreeing that a minimum of 80% of mitigation funds should be distributed within the neighborhoods that are impacted by these projects.

O-16     Sept 10, 2012  Amended
MAYOR DAVIS
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to create an inventory of the vacant lots and derelict buildings throughout Cambridge that the city could potentially purchase to add to the city's open space inventory for other city uses.

O-17     Sept 10, 2012  Withdrawn
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that residents in the vicinity of the former Longfellow School building on Broadway were not aware of parking changes that would impact their neighborhood; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council with information on the new parking arrangements as they relate to the operation at the school building and to work with the School Department and Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department to minimize the impact on the neighborhood.

O-18     Sept 10, 2012  Amended
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: Biking is a viable means of transportation and the installation of new bike paths would continue to encourage residents to take up biking as a green, healthy way to navigate the city; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to work with the Community Development Department to conduct a preliminary exploration of an east-west bike path alongside the commuter rail line or along the old haul route and the rail line between Aberdeen Avenue and Park Street.

O-19     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that the Cities of Service, a bi-partisan coalition of United States mayors, is seeking applicants for a grant funding program to help cities take on local challenges; and
WHEREAS: The mission of the Cities of Service is to tap into the skills, knowledge and talents of neighbors to address emerging and existing challenges through the power of volunteering; and
WHEREAS: The fund will make grants ranging from $25,000 to $100,000, with larger amounts reserved for cities with multiple initiatives; and
WHEREAS: The City of Cambridge would greatly benefit from participation in this program. A letter of intent should be submitted before July 9, 2013 and applications for this program are due on Aug 31, 2013; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Mayor's office to ensure that that the city applies for the above-mentioned program and report back to the City Council.

O-20     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: Over the last several years, a number of instances have identified that the tracking of mitigation commitments is not as robust as it could be within the city; and
WHEREAS: The impacts of the development and the mitigation have long term impacts on the neighborhoods in which they are located as well as affect the planning in these neighborhoods; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to itemize all mitigation commitments throughout the city to be compiled into a single document; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to issue a quarterly report which highlights:
  New commitments
  Completed commitments
  Commitments coming due in the next 6 months
  Commitments scheduled to expire in the next year and plans to extend, if appropriate
  Commitments at risk for not being delivered; and be it further
ORDERED: That the first report forwarded to the City Council be directed to the Neighborhood and Long Term Planning Committee where a broader discussion can occur regarding the process for ongoing monitoring by the city and the City Council of mitigation commitments.

O-21     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: In response to widespread bank foreclosures, some cities have instituted vacancy taxes and penalties to help preserve the vibrancy of neighborhoods; and
WHEREAS: Cities have also experimented with vacancy taxes to prevent landlords from shuttering stores, that create jobs and economic vitality to a community while open; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge seems to have some large absentee landlords which are leaving land and storefronts empty in an apparent attempt to land-bank them at the expense of the residents who presently live in those neighborhoods; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Community Development Department to report back to the City Council on what strategies other cities have used to dissuade land-banking and what may be applicable in Cambridge.

O-22     Sept 10, 2012  Withdrawn
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: Cambridge prides itself on its preservation, care and upkeep of its trees; and
WHEREAS: It has been reported that residents and city employees have difficulty identifying the location of trees in need of maintenance, removal or replanting; and
WHEREAS: It has been suggested that utilizing the tree database compiled by the Cambridge Department of Public Works to develop identification tags for trees under the jurisdiction of the city would make it easier to report landscaping issues; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Department of Public Works to look into the feasibility of creating the above-mentioned tag system and report back to the Cambridge City Council.

O-23     Sept 10, 2012
VICE MAYOR SIMMONS
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on the status of 2 Mount Auburn Street.

O-24     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR VANBEUZEKOM
WHEREAS: One of the goals of the Cambridge City Council is to "promote public safety and address the challenges and opportunities for multiple modes of transportation to safely share roads and sidewalks"; and
WHEREAS: For many years a situation has existed in which Western Avenue crossings at Kinnaird Street and Pleasant Street especially have been dangerous for children crossing Western Avenue to get to their school bus stop; and
WHEREAS: This situation is expected to be addressed by the completion of the Western Ave Reconstruction Project which begins September, 2012; and
WHEREAS: One of the main goals of this reconstruction project is to reduce traffic speeds and create safer crossings; and
WHEREAS: During this two-year reconstruction process, neighborhood parents are eager to have temporary but effective solutions for safe street crossings; and
WHEREAS: There are multiple challenges for safe crossings -- unmarked school bus stops along Western Ave -- some with crossing guards but most without; several crosswalk Yield Signs are placed in locations that are obscured by trees; and the vehicle speed limit of 25 mph is frequently observed to be exceeded; and
WHEREAS: More than 125 parents have signed a petition requesting solutions for safe street crossings during this construction phase; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to communicate to the Traffic, Parking and Transportation Department the resident's request that the city take strong measures to improve the pedestrian yield sign locations. Suggestions are to place brightly colored Yield Signs in the center of several crosswalks, relocate obscured pedestrian yield signs and post speed limit signs on Western Avenue; and be it further
ORDERED: That a report on this request be shared with the entire Cambridge City Council.

O-25     Sept 10, 2012
COUNCILLOR VANBEUZEKOM
WHEREAS: The City of Cambridge is working to reduce the use of fossil fuels in all municipal operations, and as part of this endeavor is exploring making the school building located at 100 Putnam Avenue (The Martin Luther King Jr. School) a "net-zero energy" building; and
WHEREAS: One of the City's first attempts in creating a city building that significantly reduced its energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions is the City Hall Annex, located at 344 Broadway; and
WHEREAS: It is often useful to review the actual performance of a project in comparison to its projected performance; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested, together with city staff, to compile a report with specific data that compares the actual energy efficiency for the City Hall Annex to its projected energy efficiency, including energy production by the building's photovoltaic panels; and be it further
ORDERED: That a report on this request be shared with the entire Cambridge City Council.

O-26     Sept 10, 2012
MAYOR DAVIS
WHEREAS: The tot lot at the Main Library has little shade for parents and caregivers who may have infants as well as children using the playground; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to create a shaded area at the tot lot, possibly by means of solar canopies.

O-27     Sept 10, 2012
MAYOR DAVIS
WHEREAS: Food Day was created by the Center for Science in the Public Interest and is a nationwide day of celebration and activism about sustainable, healthy, and affordable food, taking place this year on Oct 24, 2012; and
WHEREAS: Food Day is an effort to bring change in the food movement and includes physicians, nutritionists, labor leaders, environmentalists, farmers, chefs, authors and cookbook writers as well as parents, teachers, and citizens from all walks of life; and
WHEREAS: In Cambridge a committee has formed to celebrate Food Day as Food Week (Oct 22-28) and is planning events about food-potlucks all around the city, a film and panel about organic food, opening of salad bars at upper schools-and much, much more; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to request that the appropriate city departments, including the Department of Public Health, to support and publicize Food Day/Food Week efforts.

TEXT OF COMMITTEE REPORTS
Committee Report #1
The Government Operations and Rules Committee held a public meeting on Fri, June 22, 2012 beginning at 10:06am in the Ackermann Room.

The purpose of the meeting was to have an initial discussion with the City Manager to develop a comprehensive short and long term succession plan.

Present at the meeting were Councillor David P. Maher, Chair of the Committee; Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom; Councillor Marjorie Decker; Councillor Timothy Toomey, Jr.; Councillor Kenneth E. Reeves; Vice Mayor Denise Simmons; Robert W. Healy, City Manager; Richard Rossi, Deputy City Manager; Matt Nelson, Chief of Staff, Mayor's Office; Leo Gayne; Jason Alves; John Clifford; Interim City Clerk Donna P. Lopez; and Paula M. Crane, Administrative Assistant, City Clerk's Office.

Councillor Leland Cheung was in attendance via teleconferencing.

Also present were Terry Smith, Director of Government Affairs, Cambridge Chamber of Commerce; Robert Winters, 366 Broadway; Michael Brandon, 27 Seven Pines Avenue; Gregg Moree, 25 Fairfield Street; and Saul Tannenbaum, 16 Cottage Street.

Councillor Maher convened the meeting and explained the purpose. He read the call of the meeting. He provided an agenda for the meeting (ATTACHMENT A). Councillor Maher read Order Number Seven of Mar 19, 2012 (ATTACHMENT B).

Councillor Maher announced that this is the first time teleconferencing is being used. He announced that per the guidelines contained in Agenda Item Number Three of May 14, 2012 (ATTACHMENT C), a majority of the Government Operations and Rules committee is physically present in the meeting. Councillor Cheung, a member of the committee, was present via teleconferencing. Mr. Healy outlined the details of the teleconferencing issue and stated that the City Council should set guidelines. He stated that the chief executive officer of a municipality has the power to authorize remote participation. Such remote participation shall apply to all public bodies. As a result all local bodies will utilize this mechanism. There must be a quorum in the room with the mayor or the chair of the committee. We are in compliance with the Open Meeting Law. At this point Councillor Cheung stated that he could hear the proceedings clearly.

Councillor Maher stated that since this issue would take considerable time, it made perfect sense to wait until after the budget process was completed. He further stated that to his knowledge there has not been a citywide city manager selection process. He asked Mr. Healy to comment on this matter. Mr. Healy stated that there has never been a real search that produced a city manager. He stated that there was a 4-4 CCA/independent deadlock when he was appointed the City Manager. He gave a brief history of previous City Managers and their tenures. He did not know about the selection of the first City Manager, Colonel Atkinson, in 1942. In 1952 he was replaced by John Curry who was fired in 1966. Mr. Curry was replaced by former City Councillor Joseph DeGuglielmo who was removed in 1968. In 1968 there was search and James L. Sullivan was appointed. In 1970 Mr. Sullivan was fired and John Corcoran was hired. There was another search attempt done in this period. James L. Sullivan was recruited back to Cambridge to be the City Manager. He served as City Manager until July 1981. Robert W. Healy was appointed Acting City Manager in 1981. No search was done in this period and Mr. Healy was appointed City Manager. The City Manager summarized by a statement that searches have not proven overly successful in ultimately appointing a City Manager.

Councillor Maher asked Mr. Healy for suggestions for a vehicle to conduct a search for a City Manager. Mr. Healy stated that having time over the summer to think about this would be helpful. He stated that there are search firms for hire and stated that if the City Council were to go this route, the process would have to be a request for an invitation for bid (IFB). He stated that there are multiple agencies that perform executive searches. He stated that they are quite expensive. He stated that the quality requirements for the invitation for bid would have to be carefully worded and spelled out. The City Council would need to be involved in developing the quality requirements for a City Manager. He stated that he would like to hear from the City Council and members of the public to present an agenda for fall that would be more definitive.

Councillor Toomey stated that he was not in favor of spending money for search firms and traveling. He stated that nationwide searches have often not yielded what you expect. He favored home grown candidates.

Councillor Decker questioned Mr. Healy if these firms help to develop the process. There will be many candidates seeking this position. She stated that she is interested in having someone help the City Council with creating a process. She spoke about the importance of community input. She believes that there are many ways to approach the hiring of the City Manager. She stated that it is a challenging to protect the confidentiality. She stated that before jumping to search firm the Government Operations and Rules Committee should outline the process.

Councillor Maher stated that when the School Department was looking for the new Superintendent there was a point person in the School Department who was in total contact with the outside firm. There was a committee of stakeholders that turned the process over to the committee. Councillor Toomey stated that he was involved with the search process for Superintendent McGrath.

Councillor Reeves stated that the City Council should take this as an opportunity to do a self-study of what the city is. He spoke about a profile for the city. He informed the committee that in his church community, when a rector leaves, they have to go through a year-long process. He stated that MIT search for new president was a short search which came after an exhausting strategic planning process. The Secretary of the Institute was instrumental in the selection process. He does not think a search firm was used. Who would be the point person for City Council, he asked?

Mr. Healy stated that a search firm will do whatever is asked of it. This is a process that will be very lengthy. There is time to deal with the concept. The City Manager stated that his leadership team always been planned as a competent and capable team of people who are willing to aid in the transition. He stated that Mr. Rossi is the best athlete in the draft. He stated that there does need to be a consensus and a lead person is crucial. This person will deal with the search firm and give direction.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked if there is an informal transition team. Mr. Healy stated that the transition team is Mr. Rossi and all the assistant city managers. Mr. Rossi could be the Acting City Manager. The current department heads are a quality team.

Councillor Toomey stated that the scope of hiring the City Manager is huge. However, at any time it could be as simple as a candidate having five votes on a Monday evening.

Councillor Decker stated that an important point is that when looking at the transition team, there are people who know the city and are out and about within the community. This is an opportunity to meaningfully engage the public in the process and to see what their vision for the city is. She believes that it is worth spending time on the visioning aspect and what the City council and community want as their future vision of the city.

Councillor Reeves stated that the city has changed dramatically over time. He stated that there are vastly different changes and understanding that is worth the opportunity to examine.

Vice Mayor Simmons stated that she favored a search firm because there is merit to having "clean hands" in this process. She is talking about the permanent position. There should be a rich community process including public. She felt that the search process for the Superintendent did not include the community. She wanted an independent person to manage it all.

Councillor Maher agreed with Councillor Reeves that Cambridge is in a unique situation. The city has had 31 years of stable and leadership under Mr. Healy. His biggest concern is seeing a string of 2 year appointments which were common in the 1960's and 1970's. He stated that when he was on the School Committee, there was one nationwide search and the 5th place candidate came out on top because that was the only person who could get four votes. He stated that in his estimation was that the process resulted in an unintended result.

Councillor vanBeuzekom raised the question of a nationwide search versus hiring an inside candidate. Councillor Reeves commented that going with an in-house candidate is not necessarily the best that the City Council can do. He stated that public perception can be an issue. Councillor Reeves cited the recent hiring process which resulted in the hiring of a former City Councillor and former School Committee member. Mr. Healy responded that in each of these processes the hirings were done after review by the Ethics Commission. Councillor Reeves stated that like the Kids' Council process, he would support having the flexibility of having a staff person dedicated time working with the City Council on the City Manager search. He stated that if he had the opportunity to engage with search firms, he would be more informed of the search process. The City Council could send out letters to let potential candidates know about the possible vacancy.

Councillor Maher stated that work will be done over the summer to come up with a plan to be presented to the committee either in late summer or in September. All options will be looked into. He stated that the Government Operations Committee, along with the City Manager, will be developing a variety of options. The options will be presented to the city Council after Labor Day. Vice Mayor Simmons stated that she would like firm dates for the process. She stated that it is important to get information about the search firms. Councillor Decker also urged that the four City Councillors who are not on the Government Operations and Rules Committee be kept abreast of the process. She suggested that a calendar schedule be formed to aid in process and will provide the community with information on the process. She stated that in her view, it is worth taking a look at the ROOT website. Their process is what comes before the search process.

Councillor Cheung stated that no search firm will know the City better than the community. He likes the idea of trying to build into the process concrete ways to engage the community. Search firms come later in the process. The way to address concerns about resources is by going through a process where you can be specific as to what is being looked for in a candidate. He stated that the mechanics of engaging the community is very important.

Vice Mayor Simmons stated that there are two themes, the hiring process and the community engagement process. These could be done at the same time.

Councillor Maher questioned the strategic plan regarding the vision. Councillor Decker spoke about the vision of what kind of community is wanted and what are the tools to get us there.

Councillor Reeves stated that it is important to know the candidates and who they are engaged with.

Councillor vanBeuzekom spoke about the importance of benchmarking. There are other cities similar to ours that can be looked at regarding salary, benefits, structures, limitations and evaluations. She asked the City Manager if recent management staff departures were a reflection of a potential staff turnover problem. Mr. Healy stated that is it is normal for employees to retire or change positions. All vacant positions will be filled. Councillor Decker added that the consistency and longevity of city employees is a positive aspect. Mr. Healy stated that this is not a bail out. These are retirements or job enhancement opportunities. There is not an abandonment of ship taking place. There are competent people in place to continue the operations of the city.

Councillor Reeves commented that in some cities where they are looking at a change of leadership look at various CEOs to engage in the process. Is there a smart group of civic leaders who could be engaged in an advisory role? He suggested retired CEO and employees. Councillor Maher stated that these are the types of things that will be forthcoming. Councillor Toomey stated that he appreciates suggestions about reflections of us and where the City is going, however at the end of the day the City Council must make the decision. He is elected to make this decision. Councillor Decker commented that she sees this as an opportunity to check in with the public. Timelines are key. She further stated that there are other ways to skillfully engage the public as part of the process.

Councillor Maher asked how important is it that the person applying for the City Manager position understand Massachusetts General Laws (MGL). Mr. Healy stated that in consideration of candidates this knowledge should play a role in the evaluation because there is no portability in the pension system so an out-of-state candidate cannot gain credit in the Massachusetts pension system. Making the position more desirable to in state candidates the MGL are unlike any set of laws in the country. Understanding MGL is essential. Innovation is stifled by MGL. Understanding what is doable in MA is important.

Councillor Maher read into the record a communication received from Councillor Kelley who could not attend the meeting. Councillor Kelley's key points were the need to hire a professional firm, have a nationwide search, to do a self-study and to move immediately to hire a search firm. This communication was made part of the record (ATTACHMENT D).

Councillor Maher opened public comment at 11:10am.

Terry Smith, Cambridge Chamber of Commerce, stated that the process is important. He agreed with Councillor Toomey that the selection of the City Manager is decision of the City Council and that it was important to engage the public. He stated that the Chamber is happy to be engaged in this process in any way. He commented that having come to Massachusetts from another state and having met at least one other City Manager, Cambridge is a different animal than the rest of the county.

Robert Winters, 366 Broadway, stated that he looks forward to witness the process.

Michael Brandon, 27 Seven Pines Avenue, stated that he was glad that the City Council has started the process. In his view the City Council is faced with compressed timeline to move ahead. He stated that with some of the statements made regarding time is that the result is being locked into a process where there is lack of an innovative way to proceed. He supported citizen involved process. He hopes that there are no more 10am work week meetings. It would have been good to have the meeting televised for input. He suggested that the City Council form an Ad Hoc Committee of the whole rather than the matter handled in the Government Operations and Rules Committee. The City Manager's appointment and the approval of the city budget are the most important aspects of the City Council's duties. He suggested the creation of a citizen's advisory committee sharing this role with the City Council. Once the qualifications are developed it is a good job to hire a search firm. Money should not be a concern in this process. Free cash could be used. He also agreed with the visioning process and community building process; not just a search.

Greg Moree, 25 Fairfield Street, stated that the candidate hired should be someone who is known in the city. He stated that there are smart people in Cambridge who would be good candidates for the City Manager's position. He supports someone that is well known and has a longstanding relationship with the Cambridge community.

Saul Tannenbaum, 16 Cottage Street, thanked Mr. Healy for his years of service. He stated that managing Cambridge is a plum job. People should be knocking on the door to do this job. Mr. Tannenbaum spoke about his experience with search firm. It will cost the city more to have a bad hire. This process can benefit with the use of technology. The focus should be on figuring out the best process and going with it. He favored civic engagement. The Government Operations and Rules Committee should have a web site and this process should be as transparent as possible. This is an issue of city and City Council credibility. Transparency should start at the close of this meeting. He stated that Cambridge has a great transition team in place. Mr. Healy is an institution, but he is just a guy. If he has done his job well the people he has in place should be able to do their job.

Councillor Reeves questioned Councillor Maher about an online forum, web presence, etc which would broaden civic engagement. He would like to get some information on who search firms are and what is their specialty. Councillor Reeves asked how you evaluate who you get. Help is needed with evaluation on the web. Mr. Healy stated that the search firms would contact and/or invite participation from organizations such as MMA or NLC who specialize in helping cities find new leadership. Councillor Maher stated that this information will be provided.

Vice Mayor Simmons spoke about the concept of the web presence and stated that if this is done, there needs to be a person who will manage this aspect. Mr. Tannenbaum added that there are people at Harvard and MIT who are specialist on public engagement. He explained what he meant by web presence is that a meeting was held on this and this is what happened.

Councillor Maher stated that in the past, candidates sometimes want to remain anonymous. Mr. Healy stated that applicants are assured of confidentiality during the application process until such time as appointing body narrows down the finalists.

Councillor vanBeuzekom stated that she wanted a better phrase than "transition team" with personnel who are currently department heads.

In conclusion Councillor Maher stated that summary work will be done in summer. The meeting will be posted. Councillor Reeves commented that there may need to be a series of meetings.

Councillor Maher thanked all present for their attendance.

The meeting was adjourned at 11:35am on motion of Councillor Toomey.

For the Committee,
Councillor David P. Maher, Chair


Committee Report #2
The Economic Development, Training and Employment Committee conducted a public meeting on Mon, Aug 6, 2012 beginning at 3:10pm in the Sullivan Chamber.

The purpose of the meeting was to receive an overview from the Community Development Department of the Grand Junction Rail with the Trail (RWT) Feasibility Study of 2006 and to discuss actions the City can make towards its construction. For the full Rail with Train Feasibility Report visit http://www.cambridgema.gov/CDD/Projects/Transportation/grandjunctionpathway.aspx.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Timothy J. Toomey, Chair of the Committee; Councillor Leland Cheung; Mayor Henrietta Davis; Councillor vanBeuzekom; Vice Mayor Simmons; Richard Rossi, Deputy City Manager; Susanne Rasmussen, Director, Environmental and Transportation Planning Division, Community Development Department (CDD); Cara Seiderman, Transportation Planner, Environmental and Transportation Planning Division, CDD; Jason Alves; Matt Nelson, Chief of Staff for Mayor Davis; and Interim City Clerk Donna P Lopez.

Also present were Sarah Gallop, MIT; John Sanzone, Westgate, MIT; Richard Fanning, 21 Cornelius Way; Mark Jaquith, 213 Hurley Street; Robert LaTremouille, 875 Massachusetts Avenue; Larry Bluestone, Bluestone Planning Group; David Vanderwoude, Representative Walz's Office; Conrad Crawford, CRA, 169 O'Brien Highway; Rosalie Anders, 154 Auburn Street; Rachel Burckardt, 1429 Cambridge Street; Rachel Walters, 2 Eighth Street; and Robert Winters, 366 Broadway.

Councillor Toomey opened the meeting and stated the purpose. The Grand Junction has been discussed since the 1990's. The Community Development Department staff will give a short presentation. He stated that with all the economic activity in the City, the Grand Junction will connect the north/south side of the City for bicyclist and pedestrians thereby linking Boston, MIT, Cambridge neighborhoods and Somerville. The goal is to connect the Longwood area. With the Kendall Square development the car usage has gone done. In the Innovation Agenda (IA) the students will access this trail and get to the schools. This meeting will see where the City is at and where we will go from here. Funding sources are being identified for this project. How can we make this a reality.

Councillor Toomey requested Ms. Seiderman to conduct the presentation, after which there would be a discussion and then public comment.

Ms. Seiderman gave a brief overview of the Grand Junction and the feasibility study. The Feasibility Study was completed in 2006 to see if an active trail could be created along a rail line. This has been in the works for a long time. The use of the Grand Junction as a linear path was contained in the Green Ribbon Report in 2000. It was part of ECAP study. People love having community paths and there is a need for more of these types of facilities. A common right of way is shared. This is not unique; this concept is used around the country. Some paths are located along rail ways. The Grand Junction was a study to examine the use of commuter rail line connections by creating a non-motorized trail. It was decided not to move forward, but reserved the right to change its decision. This is a complicated area with multiple use and multiple owners. It is also next to dense and open space areas. The Study did examine putting in a path and add the urban ring; these were found to be feasible. The urban ring plans have changed since 2006. The report contained next steps. She distributed an Executive Summary of the Feasibility Study (ATTACHMENT A). Ongoing work has been done on creating a trail and creating a Pathway Overlay District along the Grand Junction corridor to protect the future use of the corridor as a multi-use path. The first segment the CRA received money to build a path at Main and Broadway and is being built by Mass. DOT. She stated that the next step is to bring the design to the next level. Another section of the path needs to be constructed. This is not a stand alone; it connects many areas in the city.

Councillor Toomey stated that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has just purchased the tracks from CXS . It will be helpful to have a multi-use path. Ownership by the City of Cambridge of the Boston Properties land would give city ownership from Binney to Main Streets. This will benefit many people. Mr. Rossi stated that this is a project looked at every year in capital budget. The City has talked to MIT to ensure this area is not included in their planning process. Councillor Toomey asked if funding is available from the CPA. Mr. Rossi responded in the affirmative. Mayor Davis stated her support for the project. She is glad to hear that there is funding for this project. What a great way to provide transportation on the eastern part of the city.

Councillor Cheung stated that this is a fantastic addition to the city. He questioned if there was any thought to the train layout or any concern about people wandering into the cars. Ms. Seiderman explained that there will be a fence between the rail line and the path. Fear is greater than reality has been the experience of other communities. She highlighted examples of communities which have rails with trails: Springwater Trail in Portland, Oregon, Metrobikelink, Illinois and Street Car and Rail, Seattle, Washington. A discussion ensued about the different types of fences. Ms. Rasmussen added that the Commonwealth would require a fence. Councillor Cheung asked if the Pathway Overlay District is already in the Zoning Ordinances. Ms. Seiderman stated that this language is in code and is only applicable to Grand Junction. Councillor Cheung asked if a recommendation is needed to add this to the Grand Junction. Ms. Seiderman responded in the affirmative; this was in the recommendation. Councillor Cheung asked if there was reason why the eastern corridor was not added. Ms. Seiderman responded that it was just taking too long.

Councillor vanBeuzekom focused on the "next steps". The first step is being done. She asked how the urban ring aligns with the trail. She felt the area was not wide enough in the entire section. Ms. Seiderman stated that the bus/transit line is only in a small portion from Sendick and Erie Streets. The original urban ring was to go to BU Bridge; it was changed to use Albany Street. It would fit with the MIT air right and a width report was done. It is a 60+wide corridor. The urban ring could be put on the entire corridor. Councillor vanBeuzekom stated that she would like the language to be forwarded to the Ordinance Committee for consideration.

At 3:42pm Councillor Toomey opened the meeting to Public Comment.

Richard Fanning, 21 Cornelius Way, stated that the Pathway Overlay District proposal is fairly extensive. He asked if there is any railroad use in the district before January 2005 or the base zoning. What does this mean. Is there a provision to extend the railroad line from Worcester to North Station. Ms. Seiderman stated that this language was written looking toward Watertown. This language exists in the Zoning Ordinance now; this would be looked at for the applicability of this for the Grand Junction. Those are the uses that were allowed at that time. Mr. Fanning questioned if it could be used as train service to Worcester. Ms. Seiderman stated that this does not speak to that issue. Ms. Seiderman stated that this proposal has to do with what can be built as a right of way.

Councillor Toomey commented that federal law preempts any local authority for zoning. Mr. Rossi stated that if the railroad abandons the land the state, then the City would be asked if they are interested in the land. Mr. Fanning stated that there is no pedestrian friendly crossing and these crossings are very expensive. Ms. Rasmussen stated that the Commonwealth has stated they will put in crossing gates. There is no schedule of this as of yet. MIT has been granted right to construct pedestrian gate at Pacific Street;

MIT has 3 pedestrian crossings. Mr. Fanning asked would the pedestrian crossing be allowed for the commuter rail. Ms. Rasmussen responded that the state would look at this and if there is any additional safety measures needed. Councillor vanBeuzekom suggested a stop sign at crossings. Ms. Rasmussen informed the committee that each crossing will have signage. Ms. Seiderman added signage would be on both sides of path.

Ms. Gallop stated MIT has engaged in this matter for eight years. The area owned by MIT in Grand Junction is from Broadway to CASPAR. There is a lot of equipment delivery, truck traffic and a loading dock. This area services the lab areas. There are two pedestrian crossings that need to be considered. Councillor Toomey asked if MIT has looked into realigning its deliveries. Ms. Gallop stated that it is complex, but it has been discussed. Councillor Toomey stated that if MIT had concerns about deliveries he suggested an overpass. Councillor vanBeuzekom asked there are trucks along the rail trail. Ms. Gallop responded in the affirmative.

Mark Jaquith, 213 Hurley Street, requested information about the projected costs of the pathway and the funding sources. He stated that there is pool of money for open space. Councillor Toomey stated that it is a fact about the funding; CPA options, major institutions and the CRA. There is $2.1M for the acquisition for the parcel on Binney Street. The Feasibility Report on line has cost estimates and differences if line was moved. This was done in 2006 and a new cost estimate would need to be done. Mr. Jaquith asked about the estimated cost for Cambridge. Councillor Toomey stated that $6 million from Alexandria. Boston Property deeding the land to the City is worth $1.5 million.

Mr. Conrad Crawford stated that with Hubway, the increase in traffic and the increase along the river this would be a big deal to move forward. He supported incremental change. Pathway Overlay District he supported. The development and design if the trail was oriented inward it would be interesting to visualize. He urged coordination between the CRA and other city agencies and to have the open space conversation.

Rosalie Anders, 154 Auburn Street, stated that it is going to fabulous.

Rachel Burckardt, 1429 Cambridge Street, stated that before the Feasibility Study, as a civil engineer, she offered technical advice for the Grand Junction. She suggested creating the "Friends of Grand Junction" to look for possibilities. She wants to see the Grand Junction come to fruition. MIT is not the easiest place to start. She suggested starting in another area because once started the goal to continue is high. Ms. Seiderman thanked Ms. Burckardt for the report she created before the study.

Robert Winters, 366 Broadway, stated his support.

Robert LaTremouille, 875 Massachusetts Avenue, stated he would send in his comments in writing. The southern end will have problems. Problems would disappear if the trail went through two buildings on Memorial Drive. He spoke about rejection of the environmental problems in the report. He has been working on the Urban Ring since 1987. The Legislature has spent money for the Kenmore crossing.

At 5:09pm Councillor Toomey closed Public Comment.

Councillor Cheung asked if there was any thought to connecting the west to east in Cambridge, from the Grand Junction towards Fresh Pond. Ms. Seiderman discussed more consistent way to get across the city with the bikes. Mr. Rossi spoke about the haul road. The railroad line went from Danehy Park to Upland Road.

At this time Councillor Toomey submitted the following motion:
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to instruct the Law Department to prepare the necessary language to create the Pathway Overlay District from the Charles River to the Cambridge/Somerville line.

Three e-mails were received and made part of the record as follows:

Carol R. Adler outlined her concerns about how trains will impact a trail at the Grand Junction (ATTACHMENT B);

Charlie Marquardt outlined the benefits of a Grand Junction multi-use path (ATTACHMENT C); and

Jackie Douglas in support of the Grand Junction (RWT) Project (ATTACHMENT D).

Councillor Toomey thanked all those present for their attendance.

Councillor vanBeuzekom requested that Ms. Seiderman provide the costs estimates for the report. (ATTACHMENT E).

The meeting adjourned at 4:15pm on motion of Councillor Toomey.

For the committee,
Councillor Timothy J. Toomey, Jr., Chair


Committee Report #3
The Transportation, Traffic and Parking Committee held a public meeting on Thurs, May 31, 2012 at 5:35pm in the Sullivan Chamber.

The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the Parking and Transportation Demand Management Ordinance (PTDM); how the ordinance works for property owners who comply with the PTDM Ordinance; the specific tactics used to reduce Single Occupancy Vehicles (SOVs) and whether the PTDM Ordinance merits expansion to better serve and inform decision making in the current development boom.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom, Chair of the Committee; Councillor Leland Cheung; Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager for Community Development; Susanne Rasmussen, Director of Environmental and Transportation Planning, Community Development Department (CDD); Stephanie Groll, PTDM Planning Officer; Sue Clippinger, Director of Transportation, Traffic and Parking; Savitri Khalsa; and Interim City Clerk Donna P. Lopez.

Also present were Kris Locke and Alexandra Offiang, Harvard University; Allen Breed, MIT; Meghan Miller, VHB; Dale Blank and Stan Franzeen, Pfizer/Green Wheels; Terry Smith, Director of Government Affairs, Cambridge Chamber of Commerce; and residents John Pitkin, 18 Fayette Street; Gary Mello, 324 Franklin Street.

Councillor vanBeuzekom convened the meeting and explained the purpose. She asked Mr. Murphy to give an overview of the PTDM ordinance and the PTDM program that is mandated by the ordinance, including an explanation as to why and how the PTDM program was implemented and if there are any other communities that have this type of a program.

Mr. Murphy stated that the PTDM program began as a Cambridge initiative to aid the environment by reducing single occupancy vehicle trips within the City, but now this ordinance has had an added positive impact on the city's economy and new property development. The City is pleased with the PTDM ordinance and the program that resulted from the ordinance. The goals of PTDM have been to reduce within the City vehicle trips and traffic congestion and therefore promote public health, safety, welfare and the protection of the environment. The relative success of the PTDM program is because the City's PTDM Planning Officer works collaboratively with Cambridge property owners to help them achieve specific goals. This program's evolution and successes can be demonstrated by data that is compiled yearly by the city. This program is an example of best practices for Transportation Demand Management.

Ms. Rasmussen added that other communities simply establish Transportation Demand Management agreements with developers. Cambridge's program contains a monitoring component that is unique to Cambridge. She also noted that the PTDM ordinance and program specifically governs non-residential/commercial parking.

To better explain and address questions about how well the program is functioning PTDM Planning Officer, Stephanie Groll provided Attachments A- C. The attachments contain the following information:
ATTACHMENT A: A listing of Cambridge Transportation Demand Management Measures
ATTACHMENT B: A 2011 listing of the Top 25 Cambridge Employers
ATTACHMENT C1 and C2: A large table of Cambridge PTDM and Special Permit Monitoring Data

Attachment A contains detailed descriptions of the Transportation Demand Measures. There are 3 categories of measures. They are defined as:
3) Weaker Measures;
2) Moderate Measures; and
1) Robust Measures.

The requirements of the category Weaker Measures note the elements of a traffic management plan that meet a minimum level of institutional engagement. The category Moderate Measures notes measures that show a more aggressive level of institutional engagement. The category Robust Measures contains the most aggressive level of engagement by which an institution can endeavor to encourage employees to shift away from daily single occupant vehicle trips.

Attachment B contains a table that lists the top 2011 Cambridge employers, the number of fulltime employees each employer has; the type of business it is; and whether the employer is governed by the PTDM ordinance/TDM Measures of a Special Permit or not.

Ms. Groll explained that Attachment C is a complete list of PTDM projects that are being monitored. This table also includes at the bottom, a list of six locations that are not required to meet PTDM requirements but most need to meet special permit requirements. Some Cambridge developments receive special permit status because they were:
1) Permitted prior to November 1998;
2) Are residential projects; or
3) Added no new parking when built.

The locations with special permits submitted reports on the status of implementation of TDM measures and/or their mode splits. Five of these projects were required to complete mode split surveys and reported employee mode splits of between 32% and 83% SOV.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked Ms. Groll to review the large table of PTDM and Special Permit Monitoring Data contained within Attachment C.

Since the table contained a long list of "projects" identified by their Cambridge addresses, and each address had many columns of correlated multi-year data listed in percentages, Councillor vanBeuzekom asked that the data be reviewed by explaining specific locations that were noteworthy. Noteworthy, meaning that the location was either doing well in relationship to the goals established for it by the PTDM ordinance or if the location still needed to show improvement.

Ms. Groll responded by identifying various locations within the table by the corporate name that is associated with the address in the table. For example, she noted that the company known as Amgen (360 Binney St) meets the category Robust Measure and has successful participation in the PTDM program. The reason this company is successful in meeting goals established for it by the ordinance, is that the company encourages employees to use public transit by paying employees 100% of the cost of monthly T-Passes. For employees who choose instead to drive to work, the employee ends up paying money out of pocket, because the company pays for only 50% of their parking garage costs. Additionally, each month Amgen employees who choose to walk or bike to work are rewarded with a $50 stipend.

Ms. Rasmussen stated that Novartis also meets the category Robust Measure for its PTDM program. The table shows that the percent of participation values remain consistently successful since 2005 [each year since 2005 the SOV rate met is around 35%; 2011 SOV Target was 50% so they have exceeded the goal set for them]. She noted that Harvard University also has impressive (SOV) values [each year since 2005 rate met is around 15%; 2011 SOV Target was 25% so they too have exceeded the goals set for them].

Ms. Locke, from Harvard University shared with the committee some of the incentives that Harvard University has used to reach these successful rates. The University has the following elements in place for Harvard University employees:
1) 50% discount for T-passes
2) 110 organized carpools
3) A pre-tax transit pass purchase program
4) A ride-share program
5) 28 spaces for Zip Car on campus
6) Use of Zip Car for doctor appointments

Ms. Locke stated that Harvard University has a discount rate for Zip Car usage and noted that these vehicles are parked in lots and available to anyone. Harvard employees and students are discouraged to drive by having on-campus parking fees that rise incrementally.

Harvard also hosts walking and cycling events. Harvard will sponsor six Hubway Bikeshare sites in Cambridge. They currently host five Hubway Bikeshare sites in Boston.

Mr. Smith commented that Harvard has been impressively managing parking since 1970. It is the norm on campus to not have a parking space. He noted that it takes time for individuals to get used to this culture but it is clearly the way to go if SOV trips are to be reduced.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked for further examples of locations with noteworthy projects from the large table of PTDM and Special Permit Monitoring Data. Ms. Groll pointed out the business located at 301 Binney & 320 Bent Street, Ironwood Pharmaceuticals. The company has 503 parking spaces at its location. She noted that this company decided to provide employees who do not drive to work regularly a $100 per month transportation benefit. This was their voluntary measure, which is helping them exceed their targeted SOV driving rate of 51%. In 2011, their SOV% was better than the goal set for them. Instead of simply attaining a SOV driving rate of 51% they had a SOV driving rate of 41%.

PTDM Plans include a commitment for a numeric reduction in the percent of people accessing the project via single occupant vehicle (SOV). Monitoring and reporting to show whether the SOV mode split commitment has been achieved is a requirement of all plans. Projects that are not as successfully meeting their SOV target rates are generally those with either excess parking capacity and/or located greater than a quarter of a mile from public transit. Ms. Groll stated that in her report to the City Council on Apr 9, 2011 she noted that the oversupply of parking locations contributes to a higher SOV rate.

Monitoring begins approximately one year after the new facility is occupied. Projects with a total of 5 to 19 parking spaces are defined as Small Project PTDM Plans. These locations are asked to make a commitment to implement 3 transportation demand management measures, but there is no SOV mode-split commitment or annual monitoring.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked who has met or succeeded the SOV goals. Ms. Groll cited the following from Attachment C.

(F2) Kendall Square SOV target is 55% 2011 SOV met is 51%
(F8) Tech Square SOV target is 50% 2011 SOV met is 39%
(F9) 50-60 Hampshire Street SOV target is 56% 2011 SOV met is 41%
(F10) University Park Phase IV
(80 Landsdowne Street)
SOV target is 59% 2011 SOV met is 47%

When a locations' 2011 SOV percentage is less than the SOV target percentage then the location has met and exceeded the PTDM goal for vehicle reduction. When the 2011 SOV percentage is greater than the SOV target percentage then the location has not met the PTDM goal for vehicle usage reduction.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked what type of employee TDM benefit is provided by Forest City. Ms. Groll stated that Forest City provides, for employees who choose to not drive to work, $175 per employee per quarter.

Mr. Murphy, commented on the City sponsored Go Green Awards. The goal of these awards is to celebrate successful environmental accomplishments within the community including employers who successfully support and promote the City's PTDM measures.

Councillor vanBeuzekom stated that there will be a lot of development going on in the City in the future and she is pleased that the PTDM officer is so actively involved.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked if the City is looking into the concept of "Shared Parking" as a way to limit single occupancy vehicle travel.

Ms. Clippinger, Director of Transportation, Traffic and Parking explained that the concept of shared parking looks at peak parking patterns that are observed at different times of the day. "Shared parking" aims to avoid building too much parking by, for example, sharing parking spaces between employees during the day and residents during the evening. This idea is a good one, and goes hand-in-hand with the goals of the PTDM ordinance/program. Ms. Clippinger added that there is nothing in the current zoning that prohibits taking advantage of shared parking. There is no zoning change needed.

Ms. Rasmussen stated that analyzing the PTDM data allows the City to assess how well projects work. Those projects that use the Robust Measures generally achieve the SOV goals set for them.

Mr. Murphy stated that with this information, the City can better look at projects going forward. It aids the planning process to have hard data about community patterns. An interesting new demographic is that car travel rates are going down.

Mr. Murphy added that the City is actively working to incentivize more biking and deincentivize driving autos. Ms. Rasmussen commented that the quadrangle at Alewife is an area of challenge for reducing auto travel and increasing biking/pedestrian travel.

Councillor vanBuezekom asked how the PTDM ordinance translates for people who live in Cambridge as opposed to people who work in Cambridge. Ms. Groll stated that for new residential projects that need a Special Permit - generally a reduced cost MBTA pass is given to each adult in order to encourage them to create a new habit when they move into a new home within the City. Also, new Special Permit residential locations are required to have a transportation coordinator. During the planning process for these properties, 1 bike parking space per unit is requested. Projects are also required to post transportation info in a central location and provide it to residents when they move in.

Ms. Rasmussen stated that while charging for parking is a good tool to reduce driving to work, the City generally no longer requires, as part of the special permits for residential projects, that residents be charged separately for off-street parking. The reason for this is that, if charged for off-street parking, a fraction of the residents choose instead to get a $20 residential parking sticker and then park on the street. So, charging for onsite off-street parking at residential properties has the negative impact of reducing the amount of curbside parking available to city residents who do not have access to off-street parking. The only situation where the City would recommend that residents be charged directly for off-street parking would be if a project is located in an area where "spillover parking" onto the streets is not a concern, for example if the project is located far away from other residential neighborhoods.

John Pitkin, 18 Fayette Street, spoke about the data for Harvard and the response rates. He asked whether MIT is providing leadership in this matter as well. Ms. Groll stated that the minimum response rate is 60%. Harvard employs a sample survey method which allows them to claim a 100% response rate. Mr. Pitkin asked if this collection method is reliable. Ms. Groll explained how it is a reliable method and that additionally every two years actual parking occupancy rates and driveway counts are collected. This data is then compared with the survey data to check its accuracy.

Ms. Rasmussen stated that she feels that the data is reliable because the responses do not appear to be biased towards only people who do not drive. People who choose to drive often also take the opportunity in surveys to vigorously explain why driving is the only way to travel. She also noted that MIT is not regulated under the PTDM ordinance -- because they have not added parking since 1998. Mr. Murphy added that if you get someone out of their car for one day a week then this is a 20% reduction.

Stan Franzeen stated that he works for Pfizer but today was speaking on behalf of a Transportation Management Association that he works with. He expressed his concern that the city's PTDM SOV Target rates are based on 1990 census data. He suggested that the City use 2000 census data -- which may represent more accurately the SOV target rates. Ms. Rasmussen noted that the data for 2000 is more current -- however the 2010 census did not contain travel information.

Ms. Rasmussen explained that the 1990 data was used to set a baseline or benchmark from which the City could improve. The PTDM SOV Targets for projects were set at 10% below the 1990 baseline. The City is seeking to make an improvement from the baseline. Ms. Rasmussen stated that the 1990 data shows who drove to work alone from specific census tracts.

Mr. Franzeen suggested that this issue should be revisited and that a new baseline be established based on the 2000 census data. Councillor vanBeuzekom asked if it would be a huge task for the City staff to review the data in the 2000 census. Ms. Rasmussen stated that when the 1990 census data is compared with the 2000 census data, the newer 2000 census data shows some census tracts had higher drive-alone rates and some census tracts had lower drive-alone rates. Ms. Rasmussen noted that because of this pattern in the data, there would be an averaging effect if 2000 Census data were used to set SOV Targets, in some instances it would be much easier for projects to reach SOV target and in other instances it would be more difficult for projects to reach SOV target. For this reason, the later 2000 census data is not used - it would have no real net effect. Councillor vanBeuzekom noted that generally she looks at the actual achieved SOV rates -- rather than the SOV targets set.

Gary Mello, 324 Franklin Street, read a prepared statement. "The City is the 3rd biggest employer and city employees bring the most cars into the City." Within his statement he challenged the benefits that the City of Cambridge gives to its employees. For example, he felt many City employees have been exempt from paying for work parking spaces. He suggested a resolution to eliminate this exemption. He also asked the city disclose how much it is paying for off-street parking for employees. Noting employees of the city will stop driving cars when doing so is too expensive. Mr. Mello quoted two slogans "We have seen the enemy and it is us." and "Practice what you preach." The City is a major cause of traffic congestion in the City. He noted the Mayor was given an electric car; but that in reality she already has a car. City department heads and certain employees are given free cars and all earn over $100,000. He also expressed incredulousness at the increase in the residential parking permit fee last year. He noted that this fee increase is not enough to get people to stop driving.

Councillor vanBeuzekom explained the purpose of the residential permit parking fee and then explained how this collected fee per state law funds decreased single occupancy driving throughout the city. Mr. Mello stated that there are over 2000 city employees and most drive to work. Councillor vanBeuzekom stated that the City of Cambridge seems to comply with the PTDM ordinance since as an employee she too has filled out the required employee mode split survey. Councillor vanBeuzekom then asked what the City's SOV rate is. Ms. Rasmussen responded that the data is not finalized yet. She feels that the final value will be in the low 60's. The data will be available in the next fiscal year and will be shared publicly.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked how the PTDM data correlates to the age of the respondent. Ms. Rasmussen acknowledged that a relationship exists. She stated that there is a different attitude around transportation for the younger generation. Biking is a mode of transportation used mostly, by the younger population.

Councillor vanBeuzekom commented that she does not want people to feel subjected to a Traffic Demand Plan, but rather she wants to inspire them, by pointing to the City's data with pride, showing how large companies are actually able to achieve low driving rates with their employees. Time did not allow for an extensive discussion on how to better the rates for the locations who are not meeting their SOV Targets.

Councillor vanBeuzekom thanked the Community Development Department and the staff for putting the information together for the meeting. Councillor vanBeuzekom thanked all attendees for their participation.

The meeting adjourned at 6:40pm.

For the Committee,
Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom, Chair


Committee Report #4
The Environment Committee conducted a public meeting on Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 5:05pm in the Sullivan Chamber.

The purpose of the meeting was to conduct a public meeting to discuss implementation of a plan for separate trash or recycling curbside pickup for small businesses along existing curbside routes.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom, Chair of the Committee; Councillor Leland Cheung; Councillor Tim Toomey; Richard Rossi, Assistant City Manager; Lisa Peterson, Commissioner of Public Works; John Fitzgerald, Environmental Services Manager; John Nardone, DPW Operations Commissioner; Randi Mail, Recycling Director; Kevin Douglas, Russell Disposal; Adam Mitchell, Save That Stuff; Quinton Zondervan, Green Cambridge; Terrance Smith, Cambridge Chamber of Commerce; Judith Nathans, Cambridge Advisory Recycling Committee; Juliana Lyman, Cambridge Advisory Recycling Committee; Robert Winters, Cambridge Advisory Recycling Committee; David Stern, Cambridge Resident; Jason Alves; Meg Montgomery; Savitri Khalsa.

Councillor vanBeuzekom welcomed all present and noted that this meeting was convened to discuss the possibility of implementing a plan for trash or recycling curbside pickup for small businesses along existing curbside routes. The committee was referred a Council Order (Attachment A) originally submitted by Councillor Toomey that requested the City of Cambridge consider a consolidation of recycling and/or trash haulers for residential and commercial areas of the Cambridge community. The city manager submitted in response to this council order request a preliminary analysis report from Public Works Commissioner Lisa Peterson with his advisement that he did not recommend the implementation of such a program based on the estimated costs noted in the preliminary analysis. (Attachment B).

Councillor vanBeuzekom agreed that the city picking up trash was not feasible, but called this meeting to explore if picking up recycling for small businesses. Picking up recycling for businesses could increase recycling rates, decrease truck traffic, improve air quality, and decrease congestion.

Recycling Director Randi Mail provided a map (Attachment C) that documented the
Number of Businesses Located within City Regions By Trash Day.

Region 1/Monday 372 Businesses
Region 2/Tuesday 557 Businesses
Region 3/Wednesday   151 Businesses
Region 4/Thursday 565 Businesses
Region 5/Friday 301 Businesses
Total 1945 Businesses

Commissioner Lisa Peterson reviewed for everyone present key points of the report that was prepared in response to the Council Order, noting it was a very preliminary investigation of what operational costs, financial costs and general implications come into play when considering implementing a curbside pickup for small businesses along existing routes. She noted that the data on "small businesses" within the city is limited and therefore the public works department made several "assumptions." One being that this service would be added along every residential street and encompass approximately 1,835 businesses.

In relation to picking up recycling, some of the key points were this:

Rich Rossi noted that in the past, the total volume of trash within the city was generated in this way:
  1/3 from city residents/city buildings
  1/3 from universities
  1/3 from private businesses

He noted these ratios may no longer apply. He also noted that in any program of this sort, it is very important that the businesses "get on board" with the concept. Lisa Peterson confirmed that the correct incentive(s) need to be in place in order to entice businesses to participate.

Randi Mail added that the value of recycling rebates vary dramatically.

She presented a chart (Attachment D) that contains City of Cambridge historical data (Nov, 2010 through July, 2012) documenting recycling since its implementation of single-stream recycling. This chart shows the number of tons of city-served curbside trash collected each month, the number of tons of single-stream recycling collected each month, the total recycling revenue paid to the city each month, and the per ton rebate rate paid to the city.

A general discussion regarding the data in this chart noted several things. The quantity of single stream recycling remains relatively constant (between 675 - 850 tons/month), while the per ton rebate rate paid to the city for this recycling varies dramatically. The revenue per ton rebate has run as low as negative $2.25 (July, 2012) to as high as positive $27.13 (August, 2011).

Randi Mail noted that the rate for single-source recyclables varies depending on the material within the stream, the material's market value, and the percent of that material within the recycling stream. She gave the example, that while aluminum (one of the materials collected) has a high material market value; it is not a high percentage within the waste stream. The composition of the recyclables and the market for each recyclable material therefore dictates the rebate rate per ton returned to the city. For this reason, Lisa Peterson noted that the city budgets very conservatively its expected revenue from recyclables to be $20,000/year.

The composition of recyclables was talked about. Randi Mail noted that generally Cambridge recyclable composition is 60% Paper/Cardboard and 40% Bottles/Cans. Lisa Peterson said any offering of business recycling would require a waste audit of selected businesses. Quinton Zondervan, Green Cambridge, noted that there is quite a broad difference in needs for recycling depending upon the type of business. Some businesses have 5 soda cans at the end of the week, while others, like a business he ran, required an entire dumpster just for the collection of cardboard. He noted having a lease in which the building landlord is responsible for trash and recycling is more efficient.

Councillor Toomey noted that while he appreciated this discussion, but the goals of his original order were in response to concerns from residents and business owners in the Cambridge Street area of East Cambridge. He has noted that on trash day in this area, there are far too many vehicles on the street. He asked the following questions and expressed the following concerns. "If you look at the data map for pick-ups you'll notice that the area from Lechmere Square to Inman Square has the highest number of businesses contained in one area (565 businesses). Can the city do something to reduce the congestion, the number of vehicles, the number of vehicle trips and as a benefit improve the air quality in this neighborhood? Can the city better coordinate all these haulers? In the past, there was a fee paid by businesses for the city to pick up trash. Can the city pursue reducing perhaps 50% of the traffic? This is a cost that is worth bearing for the residents of Cambridge."

Terri Smith, the Director of Government Affairs for the Cambridge Chamber of Commerce, agreed with Councillor vanBeuzekom noting recycling for businesses is a great idea. He pointed out though, there needs to be a clear understanding of how to approach this possibility. Lots of challenges exist. For example, many businesses do not even have the required space needed to store on site recycling toters. Councillor vanBeuzekom poised the idea that the city didn't need to provide toters - but could charge businesses for the toters - as part of a reasonable fee for participating in a recycling program.

A discussion in relation to a question posed by Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom followed.

"How well are the city and its business owners doing complying with the city's Recycling Ordinance?"

All members of the meeting participated in this discussion. Important background was communicated by all stakeholders, city executive staff, city DPW staff, members of the Cambridge Advisory Recycling Committee, city councillors, business representatives, environmental activists, and several hauler/recycling company representatives.

Lisa Peterson noted that there are lots of issues that need resolution. The current recyclable ordinance is mandatory for any business that has greater than 5% of recyclable material in the waste stream. The ordinance requests businesses to submit a plan for its recyclables to the city. The compliance portion of this ordinance is about 15 years old, is out-of-date and needs updating. The city has not been enforcing recycling for businesses. It also has not been collecting any data. Regulation and education was more effectively carried out several years ago when there was a DEP-funded commercial enforcement recycling person working on the issue.

The city offers a drop-off center for businesses with 50 or fewer employees. Haulers that collect trash are required to provide recycling services as well to all businesses. Some of the bigger businesses and the educational institutions such as Harvard and MIT do a great job complying and have successful onsite recycling programs in place.

Both Randi Mail and Juliana Lyman, from the Cambridge Advisory Recycling Committee noted that 2 years ago they attempted to collect data regarding business recycling. In 2010, changes to hauler's license required haulers to provide recycling services and a list of customers to the city. Randi and Juliana worked with the License Commission to get from all the Haulers a list of their clients. There were many challenges with compiling this data, including many haulers subcontract their work (data missing); there are often many businesses in one location (data aggregated when it needs to be separated); and technically the submission of the data was not in a cohesive form that could be easily merged into one usable database. Given these obstacles to a good data set, the results of this data showed that at least 35% of commercial businesses do not have a recycling program in place.

Next, followed a discussion of all the pros/cons and challenges that arise when considering adding business recycling pick up to the present recycling contract which is just for residential recycling curbside pick up.

One obstacle to businesses recycling is that many choose not to participate for a variety of reasons. Quinton Zondervan, Green Cambridge, noted that he has been partnering with the DPW to educate businesses to the pros of and the how-to's of recycling. He states some businesses level of recycling is so small, it makes sense to allow them to be considered part of the "residential recycling" pick up.

Cambridge resident, David Stern voiced concern that many small business owners, pedestrians with recyclable trash, in the Harvard Square to Porter Square area would really like to do more recycling, but there is a total lack of recycling containers on the streets in this part of Cambridge. He asked, "Can the city do more? Can the city make an overture to small businesses such as Marathon Sports or the Montrose Spa, to assist them in recycling? Can the city place recycling toters for motivated recyclers to use in this part of town?"

Cambridge Advisory Recycling Committee member Robert Winters noted that it seems very illogical to have individual business plans submit recycling plans in locations where for example, there are multiple businesses within one building, or for a strip of businesses. There should simply be a "building plan" for recycling or a "strip of businesses plan" for recycling in that area.

Adam Mitchell, from Save That Stuff, pointed out that there are two different key ideas contained within this discussion on Cambridge businesses recycling. It is important to clarify each idea.

1) Access to recyclable services. Versus 2) Choosing to access recyclable services.

One suggestion for increasing and encouraging business recycling was to increase the recycling rate by technical enforcement and by having inspectional services for example, go over a simple recycling checklist of what businesses must do. This checklist would review the basics with a business and communicate that they are expected to recycle by checking that obvious elements of a plan are in place, i.e. recycling containers, sticker with posted schedule for pick up, etc.

Councillor Toomey asked why people do not want to recycle. Individuals replied, small business owners often say, they are too busy, they do not have enough time, they do not enough space, and it is too costly to do. Noted again, were that businesses have to want to recycle. Impediments to recycling need to be cleared. For example, ordinances that require trash/recycling be placed on the curb before the business opens in the morning basically keeps businesses from recycling. On the other hand, a recent dumpster ordinance has been extremely helpful. The city can continue to look into how it can do things "differently" in order to assist efforts toward recycling.

Councillor vanBeuzekom asked Kevin Douglas, from Russell Disposal whether he thought reducing the number of vehicles for picking up recycling from Cambridge businesses could be achieved and if excess capacity existed for picking up recycling from businesses. He noted that some days were busier than others, so his company could possibly pick up more. He also felt that more trucks would be on the road if the city selected to use one recycling hauler for businesses.

Cambridge Advisory Recycling Committee member Robert Winters encouraged the city to think creatively about this challenge. Instead of implementing broad citywide policies, work together with specific neighborhoods or strip of stores and address the challenges unique to each. Choose solutions that address each problem individually. In response to trash haulers picking up all day long, he suggested the city consider asking haulers to pick up all within the same limited window of time.

Adam Mitchell noted that while waiting for this meeting he noticed 4 different mail delivery trucks arriving at City Hall and across the way 5 different food delivery trucks arriving for a restaurant. He asked why the city was focusing on hauler's trucks specifically, while the delivery and pick-up trucks for other industries came and went all day long unregulated. If we are targeting truck traffic we may be choosing the wrong type of vehicle.

Assistant City Manager Rich Rossi acknowledged that recycling for Cambridge businesses is not a simple issue of regulating the number of trucks along a specific corridor. The entire topic is a complex one that, if given some time, he would be willing to brainstorm an interim strategy with the Department of Public Works staff Lisa Peterson, John Fitzgerald, John Nardone, and Randi Mail. It was noted by those present that this problem may best be worked on in conjunction with all stakeholders - the City officials/employees, the many businesses within the Chamber of Commerce, the Recycling Advisory Committee, residents, and the Recycling/Hauler agencies.

Councillor vanBeuzekom noted that she would look to Assistant City Manager Rich Rossi and staff for their assistance in improving business recycling within the city and reducing recycling truck traffic. She then thanked all those who attended the meeting for their input on this topic.

The meeting concluded at 6:15pm.

For the Committee,
Councillor Minka vanBeuzekom, Chair


AWAITING REPORT LIST
12-02. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the repair of all street lights that are not working in Cambridge.
Vice Mayor Simmons and Full Membership 01/23/12 (O-1)

12-08. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on instituting a ban on plastic bags.
Councillor Decker, Councillor vanBeuzekom and Full Membership 01/23/12 (O-10)

12-20. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on what steps the City will take to help the general public keep track of awaiting maintenance issues on things like park equipment, graffiti, sidewalks, etc.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Decker, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Maher, Vice Mayor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 02/13/12 (O-4)

12-21. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the ownership status of the Cambridge Street overpass and on the abilities of universities and other organizations to close off property owned by them but enjoyed by the public.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Maher, Vice Mayor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 02/13/12 (O-6)

12-29. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the no left turn on the Cambridge Common and to remove the bicycle prohibition on certain streets, such as Whittemore Avenue. Referred back for additional information on 3/5/2012.
Councillor Kelley 02/13/12 (O-17)

12-40. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on improper leases and rental of owned affordable housing units. Reconsideration filed by Councillor Toomey on 6/11/2012. Report referred back to City Manager for more information on motion of Councillor Toomey on 6/18/12.
Councillor Reeves, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Vice Mayor Simmons & Councillor vanBeuzekom 03/19/12 (O-3)

12-41. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on what additional measures could be taken to improve the amount of municipal green purchasing by City government, including at the School Department.
Mayor Davis, Councillor vanBeuzekom, Councillor Cheung, Councillor Decker, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Vice Mayor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 03/19/12 (O-4)

12-44. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on how the proposal by Global Oil LLC will impact Cambridge. Referred back by Councillor Cheung for a report on 5/21/12.
Councillor Cheung, Vice Mayor Simmons, Councillor vanBeuzekom, Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 03/19/12 (O-10)

12-47. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on legal requirements for public notices and meetings of the Planning Board and Board of Zoning Appeals.
Councillor Kelley and Full Membership 04/02/12 (O-2)

12-51. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of finding additional office space for the City Council.
Vice Mayor Simmons, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Reeves & Councillor vanBeuzekom 04/23/12 (O-5)

12-54. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on how to establish an Community Choice Aggregation Network which will engage in electricity procurement for the entire City of Cambridge.
Councillor vanBeuzekom and Full Membership 04/23/12 (O-9)

12-59. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on implementing a city-wide department answering service.
Councillor Kelley and Full Membership 05/14/12 (O-4)

12-64. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on current status of the Inlet Bridge and what steps the City can take to ensure that agreements with the Commonwealth are upheld.
Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 05/21/12 (O-1)

12-65. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on an explanation as the when the main library will be open on Sundays.
Councillor vanBeuzekom, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Vice Mayor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 05/21/12 (O-2)

12-67. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on implementing a ban on trucks transporting hazardous materials through the City.
Councillor Cheung 05/21/12 (O-5)

12-69. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on repairing the condition of Avon Street and Shepard Street between Walker and Garden Streets.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/04/12 (O-7)

12-70. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on accepting payment at parking meters via credit card.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/04/12 (O-9)

12-71. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the possibility of converting the vacant lots at the corner of Watson and Brookline Streets and at 35 Cherry Street to community gardens or open space.
Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Vice Mayor Simmons, Councillor Toomey & Councillor vanBeuzekom 06/04/12 (O-10)

12-72. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on how increases in student loans might impact Cambridge students.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/04/12 (O-11)

12-74. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of expanding the barbeque pilot program in parks throughout Cambridge.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/04/12 (O-13)

12-75. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of providing a map of long term parking spots for rent on the city website.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/04/12 (O-16)

12-76. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #3
RE: report on the Willow Street shooting.
Councillor Toomey 06/04/12 (O-18)

12-77. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #3
RE: report on organizing a youth-focused community forum to discuss issues related to the shooting on Willow Street.
Vice Mayor Simmons and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-1)

12-78. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on expanding the number of Cambridge parks/playing fields with public toilets. Referred back to the City Manager on 6/18/12 on motion of Councillor Kelley.
Councillor vanBeuzekom and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-5)

12-79. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the construction of the Cambridge Street Overpass.
Councillor Kelley and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-7)

12-81. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on meeting with No. Mass Avenue neighbors, businesses and neighborhood groups about whether additional alterations to the median strip would be appropriate.
Councillor Kelley and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-9)

12-82. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of implementing an initiative similar to the Boston Meter Program.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-11)

12-83. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on adopting the local option set forth in "The Valor Act."
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-12)

12-84. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the process that insures the public way is maintained when sidewalk obstruction permits are renewed each year.
Councillor vanBeuzekom and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-13)

12-85. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on installing security cameras in the Donnelly Field area.
Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-14)

12-87. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the potential uses of the Foundry Building.
Councillor Toomey 06/04/12 (O-19)

12-88. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on how the City plans to maintain grade separated bikeways and keep them free from sand, branches and other debris.
Councillor Kelley and Full Membership 06/11/12 (O-7)

12-89. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of implementing speed-control measures at the corner of Tremont Street and Gardner Road.
Vice Mayor Simmons, Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-2)

12-90. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on Executive Session to discuss lawsuits.
Councillor Reeves and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-5)

12-91. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the installation of lower and decorative lighting along Cardinal Medeiros Avenue.
Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-6)

12-92. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on final full cost to attend the BIO2012 Conference and promote Cambridge and the contacts and possible new endeavors and city partnerships identified through this event.
Councillor vanBeuzekom and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-7)

12-93. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #5
RE: report on feasibility of supporting the concept of human-powered bicycle cabs operating within the city limits.
Councillor vanBeuzekom and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-8)

12-94. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #4
RE: report on sponsoring and promoting International PARK(ing) Day on Sept 21, 2012.
Councillor vanBeuzekom, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves & Councillor Toomey 07/30/12 (O-9)

12-95. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on creating a Pavement to Parklet program.
Councillor vanBeuzekom, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves & Councillor Toomey 07/30/12 (O-10)

12-96. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on a summary of the effectiveness of the Back of the Sidewalk Tree Planting Program.
Councillor vanBeuzekom, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves & Councillor Toomey 07/30/12 (O-11)

12-97. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the incident at the Cambridge Gateway Inn on July 5, 2012.
Councillor vanBeuzekom, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves & Councillor Toomey 07/30/12 (O-12)

12-98. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on placing an appropriate sign indicating entrance into the City of Cambridge from the North Bank Pedestrian Bridge.
Councillor vanBeuzekom, Councillor Cheung, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Maher, Councillor Reeves & Councillor Toomey 07/30/12 (O-13)

12-99. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on statistical information regarding enforcement citations for loud motorcycle mufflers, car radios and the City's plan to address these issues.
Councillor Kelley and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-16)

12-100. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #17
RE: report on whether emails to Councillors either through the City email or to their personal accounts may be shared with the general public.
Councillor Kelley, Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Maher & Councillor Reeves 07/30/12 (O-18)

12-101. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #16
RE: report on how the goals formed by the Economic Development, Training and Employment Committee last term have been translated into practice in the City administration.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-29)

12-102. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on how sequestration would effect municipal finances and the finances of human services organizations that partner with the City.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-30)

12-103. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report with a short summary on how CDBG grants have been used over the past few years in the City, with a list of completed projects, jobs created and the overall impact on the community.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-31)

12-104. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on data requested on the Andrews Petition during an Ordinance Committee hearing last term that has not yet been received.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 07/30/12 (O-34)

12-105. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on answering questions regarding the Foundry Building in order to move the community process forward.
Councillor Cheung & Councillor Toomey 07/30/12 (O-35)