Cambridge City Council meeting - August 1, 2011 - AGENDA

CITY MANAGERíS AGENDA
1. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of donations received by the Peace Commission in the amount of $742 to the Grant Fund Peace Commission Other Ordinary Maintenance account from the annual Peace and Justice Awards Dinner which will be used to offset the cost of the dinner.

2. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the transfer of $6,171 within the ARRA Title IID Technology Competitive grant from the U.S. Department of Education from the School Department Grant Fund Salary & Wages account ($4,471) and from the School Department Grant Fund Travel and Training account ($1,700) to the School Department Grant Fund Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($6,171) which will allow for the purchase of a smartboard.

3. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the transfer of $75,000 from General Fund Cable Television Salary and Wages account to the General Fund School Salary and Wages account from Municipal Access fees paid to the City from Comcast and will be used to cover the costs of an Educational Access Program Manager position.

4. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of a Public Safety Answering Point Emergency Communications Center Support (PSAP Support) Grant funded from the State 911 Department for $301,330 to the Grant Fund Emergency Communications Salaries and Wages account ($177,330) and to the Grant Fund Emergency Communications Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($124,000) which will continue to support three dispatch positions and the purchase and maintenance of dispatch equipment.

5. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the transfer of $30,000 from the General Fund Employee Benefits (Insurance) Salary and Wages account to the General Fund Employee Benefits Travel and Training (Judgment and Damages) account to cover current and anticipated medical services and/or prescription reimbursement costs for personnel injured in performance of their duties for various departments based on current and anticipated costs for the remainder of the fiscal year.

6. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of a reimbursement in the amount of $879,198 from Sprint Nextel to the Grant Fund Fire Salary and Wages account ($179,198) the Grant Fund Other Ordinary Maintenance Account ($150,000) and to the Grant Fund Fire Extraordinary Equipment account ($550,000) to support the rebanding of city radios.

7. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of $75,524 from Urban Development Action Grant (UDAG) Program Income to the Grant Fund Community Development Department Other Ordinary Maintenance account to fund a two-year contract with the Area Four Neighborhood Coordinator.

8. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Numbers 10-173, 10-176, 10-180, 10-181 and 10-183, regarding zoning mitigation.
Referred to Gov't Operations & Rules Committee

Aug 1, 2011
To the Honorable, the City Council:

In response to Awaiting Report Item Numbers 10-173, 10-176, 10-180, 10-181 and 10-183, I report the following:

Council Requests

Several recent Council Orders have raised questions about the process or mechanism for the City to receive revenues negotiated during requests to change zoning for density increases. Several departments including Law, Assessing, DPW and CDD worked with the Manager's Office to draft a comprehensive response to the following Council Orders regarding a formula and a mechanism for obtaining community benefits:

CO #12, dated 11/1/10, Report on affordable housing as part of mitigation in zoning mitigation discussions

CO #3, dated 11/22/10, Report on the feasibility of creating a "bonding program" for the purpose of ensuring that a process exists to enable the completion of work on projects where a developer fails to comply with an agreed-upon community mitigation agreement.

CO #3, dated 11/22/10 and 12/14/10, Report on feasibility of developing a formula/mechanism for receiving revenues negotiated during zoning changes and the possibility that such revenues generated by a formula for distribution to community-based non-profits.

CO #13, dated 11/22/20 and 12/14/10, Report on the current formula that the City uses to calculate linkage payments for large scale projects.

CO #1 dated, 12/13/10 and 1/19/11, Report on state of the law relating to community benefits as mitigation in zoning amendments

This memorandum reports on recent mitigation activities and proposes a new process that, on balance, allows the city to capture meaningful community benefits without overburdening developers.

Background

Recent requests have resulted in a range of what developers have provided as mitigation. For example, the Council negotiated mitigation with Boston Properties for the expansion of the Broad Institute site last summer. Neighbors and City Councilors negotiated with Alexandria during the Binney Street project.

In addition to immediate neighborhood impacts, there are citywide needs and benefits that could be considered in the development of appropriate mitigation. Some possible considerations include infrastructure projects for roadways, schools and other municipal buildings; energy reduction and sustainability programs; augmentation of human services, affordable housing and library programs; tree planting, parks, open space and beautification programs.

Legal Considerations

The Law Department was asked about the legal basis for negotiated mitigation for zoning requests. Usually mitigation negotiations occur when developers seek special permit approval for a site specific project. Negotiated community benefits during rezoning requests occur less frequently. The case of Durand v. IDC Bellingham, LLC, 440 Mass.45 (2003) is instructive. Based on this case, the Law Department advised that the City could proceed with developing a process for mitigation regarding the receipt of revenues arising from the zoning amendment process so long as procedural requirements were met and so long as there was no quid pro quo. (See attached memo dated Apr 14, 2011 from the Law Department)

Existing Site Mitigation

In addition to zoning mitigation, developers are often responsible for site specific mitigation during the special permit process. These site specific mitigation measures should be maintained and are not included in the mitigation process recommended below.

1. Site mitigation

When a developer seeks a Planning Board special permit, there are often site-specific impacts that need to be mitigated such as new water lines, storm water mitigation, sewer separation, street and sidewalk repairs, traffic signals and traffic calming, tree planting and open space. CDD staff coordinate with Traffic Parking and Transportation, Public Works and Water Departments to be sure that the site-specific mitigation is appropriate. These measures can add to the cost of a project, but reflect the additional impact that the new development has on city services and infrastructure.

2. Incentive Zoning

In addition to site mitigation, developers of certain types on non-residential developments are required to make an Incentive Zoning contribution to offset the impact of their development on the housing market.

Prior to enacting the Incentive Zoning Ordinance in 1988, the City conducted a nexus study to demonstrate the impact of commercial development in Cambridge on the city's housing market. The study quantified the increase in housing demand generated by new commercial development and the impact on housing prices associated with the increased demand, to establish the nexus between increased housing prices and new commercial development.

The Incentive Zoning contribution rate, originally set at $2/square foot, can be updated annually by the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust based on changes in the CPI index, and can be fully reassessed by the City Council every three years based on "a consideration of current economic trends" such as changes in housing prices, commercial rents, and vacancy rates. Since 1988, the Incentive rate has been increased several times, most recently to $4.38/square foot in 2008 by the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust.

An updated nexus study was conducted in 2002 to assess economic trends and changes in the impact of commercial development on the housing market. The study recommended increasing the Incentive Zoning rate to $7.83/square foot. However, the rate was not increased at that time. Given recent trends in development, it would be reasonable to repeat the nexus study to determine whether the Incentive Zoning contribution rate should be adjusted.

Zoning Mitigation Analysis and Funding Process

Given the desire to mitigate rezoning requests for increased density with impacts both in the vicinity of the rezoning area and citywide, this report suggests a mechanism and a process for balancing the rezoning requests with the impacts on affected neighborhoods, the city as a whole and the needs of developers and companies to grow the Cambridge economy.

Based on an analysis of recent negotiated community benefits resulting from rezoning requests, a mitigation fee of up to $10 per square foot for each square foot of increased floor area above what zoning allows is recommended. The per-square-foot amount may be adjusted at the time of the tri-ennial assessed valuation certification process by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue. This mitigation fee amount could be reduced for square footage devoted to publicly accessible open space and buildings and construction of affordable housing after analysis by City staff. Mitigation payments would be deposited into a city community benefit fund. Funds shall be distributed in the following manner:

Fifty percent shall be used as neighborhood mitigation for impacts on the neighborhoods surrounding the rezoning area, exclusive of site-specific mitigation.

Fifty percent shall be used for mitigation for impacts on the City's infrastructure and programs, exclusive of site-specific mitigation.

A Community Benefits Committee, appointed by the City Manager, would be responsible for making recommendation to the City Manager which programs, services and projects would be funded with mitigation funds. The Committee would chaired by the Deputy City Manager and include the Commissioner of Public Works, Assistant City Manager for Community Development, Assistant City Manager for Human Services or their designees, and three Cambridge residents. Terms for non-staff committee members would be for 3 years. The Committee would operate in a manner similar to the Community Preservation Act (CPA) Committee, holding a public hearing at least annually to determine which deserving city programs, services and projects might be funded with mitigation funds. By having a Community Benefits Committee make recommendation on the allocation of funds, the process would treat developers equally. It would allow developers to anticipate costs associated with rezoning. Finally, the mechanism and process would be transparent, allowing all parties to understand what is expected and how funds will be collected and distributed.

Attached for your review is a recommended Schedule of Payments.

Very truly yours, Robert W. Healy, City Manager


Schedule of Payments

The full amount of community benefit mitigation may be paid within 60 days of a zoning amendment that increases density of development over the existing zoning by more than 50,000 SF or may be paid according to the following schedule of payments:

The first community benefit mitigation payment that equals 10% of the total amount shall be made within 60 days of the adoption of a zoning amendment that increases density of development over the existing zoning by more than 50,000 SF.

A second payment that equals 10% of the total amount shall be paid within 60 days of the receipt of an appealed special permit that is not appealed.

The third payment that equals 25% of the total amount shall be paid at the time of receipt of a building permit.

If there is a request for a temporary Certificate of Occupancy a fourth payment that equals 35% of the total amount shall be paid at the time of receipt of such a request.

The final payment that equals 20% of the total amount shall be paid at the time of final Certificate of Occupancy if a payment has been made at the time of a temporary Certificate of Occupancy; otherwise, the payment shall be 55% of the total.

9. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Temporary Emergency Shelter grant received from the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) in the amount of $102,425.20 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account which will be subcontracted to the Cambridge YWCA to be used to operate its family shelter for three months, including the provision of case management for ten homeless families at a time as referred by the DHCD and to hire a staff person to provide housing search and stabilization services to families at the shelter.

10. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Civic Education Grant for $137,643 funded by the Adult and Community Learning Services through the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($120,279), the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($17,144), and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Travel and Training account ($220) which will support ESOL/Civic Education classes provided by the Community Learning Center (CLC).

11. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Adult Basic Education (ABE) grant received from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) in the amount of $652,931 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($558,173) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($93,178) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Travel and Training account ($1,580) which will provide funds for Community Learning Center (CLC) classes to adults who wish to improve their computer, reading, writing and math skills and/or to obtain a GED or Cambridge Adult Diploma as well as English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes for immigrants who need to improve their language skills.

12. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Cambridge Prevention Coalition Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Substance Abuse Services (BSAS) grant received from the U.S. Department of Public Health and Human Services in the amount of $80,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($66,881.63), the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($11,868.37), and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Travel and Training account for ($1,250) which will be used to support the Cambridge Prevention Coalition's work to continue addressing the issue of underage drinking through its programs such as its 21 Proof server/seller training, working with the License Commission, and youth programs.

13. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Cambridge Prevention Coalition Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Substance Abuse Services (BSAS) grant received from the U.S. Department of Public Health and Human Services in the amount of $30,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($28,083.75) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($1,916.25) which will be used to support the Cambridge Prevention Coalition's work to implement programs and projects to reduce opioid overdoses in collaboration with the coalition's partners.

14. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Cambridge Housing Authority Computer grant received from the Cambridge Housing Authority in the amount of $74,865 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($72,894) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($1,971) which will allow for the Community Learning Center (CLC) to provide computer classes for Cambridge Housing Authority residents at the Roosevelt Towers, Jefferson Park and at 119 Windsor Street.

15. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of $62,000 for the Center for Families program funded by the Children's Trust Fund to the Department of Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($54,800) and to the Department of Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($7,200) and will be used by the Center for Families to support family programs targeting parents of children up to six years, which include a variety of family support and parent education programs and resources.

16. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) from the Office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for $137,256 to the Grant Fund Human Services Salary and Wages account ($6,862.80) and to the Grant Fund Human Services Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($130,393.20) and will be used to contract with local shelter providers to support operating costs or rehabilitation costs of shelter facilities and other essential services.

17. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Pathways grant in the amount of $70,000 received from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Adult and Community Learning Services to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($16,695) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($53,305) which will support case management and educational services for twelve families and involves collaboration between the Community Learning Center, Agenda for Children, Center for Families, and the Childcare Resource Center. Parents attend ESOL classes, as well as participate in parenting education sessions and employability workshops.

18. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of funds for the Cambridge Employment Program (CEP) from the Cambridge Housing Authority for $62,863 to the Grant Fund Human Service Department Programs Salary and Wages account which will be used to maintain the capacity of the Cambridge Employment Program (CEP) by continuing to fund a Vocational Case Manager to provide career counseling and case management services to Cambridge residents seeking employment, particularly those residing in public housing.

19. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Cambridge Food Pantry grant received from the Cambridge Health Alliance for $15,000 to the Grant Fund Human Services Other Ordinary Maintenance account which will be used to enter into a contract with the Cambridge Economic Opportunity Committee (CEOC) to purchase nutritional foods to be distributed to eligible Cambridge residents through the Food Pantry Network.

20. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of a grant from First Literacy in the amount of $14,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($12,064.27) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($1,935.73) which will provide funds for a student leadership class on presentation skills and pronunciation for Community Learning Center students.

21. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of $30,000 for the Cabot grant funded by the Cabot Family Charitable Trust to the Department of Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($22,500) and to the Department of Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($7,500) and will support Baby U alumni programming which takes place after the 16 week core program funded by the City of Cambridge.

22. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of a grant from the Child Care Resource Center (CCRC) in the amount of $3,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($2,904) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($96) which will allow for the development of two courses for childcare workers that integrate early education content with English language skills.

23. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Cambridge Housing Authority (CHA) Bridge to College Program grant in the amount of $15,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($14,872) and to the Department of Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($128) and will provide classes and counseling for CHA residents in the Cambridge Learning Center Bridge to College program, which assists residents in making the transition to post secondary education.

24. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of a $1,000 Grant from the Microsoft Corporation to the Grant Fund of Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account received in connection with the Community Learning Center's participation in the Microsoft Day of Service Program and will support Community Learning Center programming.

25. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of a grant from the MetroNorth Regional Employment Board for $15,338 to the Grant Fund Department of Human Services Salary and Wages account ($13,532) and to the Grant Fund Department of Human Services Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($1,806) and will be used to support a six hour per week morning GED preparation class at the Community Learning Center through the funding of a math teacher, reading/writing teacher and program assistant.

26. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation from the Friends of the Community Learning Center (CLC) in the amount of $10,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account to fund a portion of ESOL teacher salaries for ESOL classes at Community Learning Center.

27. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Adult Basic Education Integrated Distance Learning Grant from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) in the amount of $5,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account which will be used to support salary related expenses for distance learning for ten CLC students, five from the waiting list and five who are currently enrolled in classes.

28. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of the Friends of the Community Learning Center (CLC) grant in the amount of $10,000 to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Salary and Wages account ($9,746) and to the Grant Fund Human Service Programs Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($254) and will support the Bridge to College Program which consists of one class that meets two evenings per week for a total of six hours of instruction per week from September 2011 through May 2012.

29. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the appropriation of a supplemental FY12 allocation from the Office of the Attorney General, Local Consumer Aid Fund for $6,000 to the Grant Fund License Commission (Consumer's Council) Salaries and Wages account ($5,000), to the Grant Fund License Commission Other Ordinary Maintenance account ($500) and to the Grant Fund License Commission Travel and Training account ($500) provided in recognition of the Cambridge Consumer Council's ability to provide mediation services for the Waltham consumer office and will be used to cover Cambridge Consumer Council staff costs.

30. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 11-66, regarding a report on the feasibility of allowing off-leash dog hours at Longfellow Park.

31. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the Planning Board recommendation on the zoning petition regarding the definition and regulation of a Public Bicycle-Sharing Service and Public Bicycle-Sharing Stations. [The Planning Board recommends the adoption of the proposed amendments to the Cambridge Zoning Ordinance, in accordance with the language presented to the Board on July 26, 2011.]

32. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to the City entering into a ten year Cable Television Renewal License with Comcast, from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2021.

Aug 1, 2011
To the Honorable, the City Council:

After an extensive public process, involving six focus groups, telephone and online surveys, financial and technical compliance reviews and a public hearing in February 2010, followed by a lengthy negotiation process, the City has entered into a ten year Cable Television Renewal License with Comcast, from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2021. The 2011 Renewal License features annual payments of 5% of Comcast's Annual Gross Revenues derived from the services it provides to Cambridge subscribers, which currently generates an annual revenue stream of approximately $1,400,000, a capital grant of $1,772,000 paid out over the ten year license term and equipment upgrades to the cable system. The City has also negotiated a ten year agreement with Comcast for a 10% Senior Citizen Discount on Basic Service and on Digital Starter Service for eligible seniors. A copy of the 2011 Renewal License is on file with the City Clerk's office.

Very truly yours, Robert W. Healy, City Manager

ON THE TABLE
1. That the City Manager is requested to restore funding for School Department clerical positions until a proper and negotiated process can be achieved with the Cambridge School Department and Unions representing the employees, and to report back to the City Council on the progress. [Order Number Fourteen of Apr 26, 2010 Placed on Table. Councillor Kelley made motions to take from table on May 10, 2010 failed 2-7-0, Sept 13, 2010 failed 4-4-1, Sept 27, 2010 failed 3-5-1, Dec 13, 2010 failed 3-6-0. Remains on Table.]

2. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 10-32, regarding a report on issues with the development of the former St. John's property site. [Charter Right exercised on City Manager Agenda Item Number Eighteen of May 24, 2010. Placed on Table June 7, 2010.]

3. An application was received from Tony LaVita, requesting permission for a curb cut at the premises numbered 68 Middlesex Street; said petition has received approval from Inspectional Services, Traffic, Parking and Transportation, Historical and Public Works. No response has been received from the neighborhood association. [Applications and Petitions Number Ten of June 7, 2010 Placed on Table.]

4. Transmitting communication from Robert W. Healy, City Manager, relative to Awaiting Report Item Number 10-189, regarding a report on the legitimacy of the tax exempt claim of Education First. [Charter Right exercised on City Manager Agenda Item Number Nineteen of Jan 24, 2011. Placed on Table Jan 31, 2011.]

5. That the City Manager is requested to have the Community Development Department convene a meeting with neighbors in the vicinity of Grove Street and Blanchard Road, the Fresh Pond Master Plan Committee and other relevant parties to review the zoning along the golf course and the Fresh Pond Reservation in that area. [Charter Right exercised on Order Number Five of Jan 24, 2011. Placed on Table Jan 31, 2011.]

6. That the City Manager is requested to report back to the City Council with a complete and comprehensive list of all concessions made to the City and broader Cambridge community by developers and the universities in exchange for zoning relief, special permits, or Council approval. [Charter Right exercised by Councillor Reeves on Order Number Eleven of Apr 25, 2011. Tabled on Motion of Councillor Cheung on May 2, 2011.]

UNFINISHED BUSINESS
7. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Sam Seidel, Chair of the Ordinance Committee for a public hearing on May 5, 2011 for the purpose of considering proposed amendments submitted in response to City Council Order No.11 of Jan 24, 2011, in which the Council requested that Community Development Department (CDD) staff engage in a comprehensive review of Section 5.28.2, including the history of the use of the section for special permit applications for conversion of commercial and institutional uses to residential building, and the recent public conversations on this section of the Zoning Ordinance. The question comes on passing to be ordained on or after June 20, 2011. Planning Board hearing held May 10, 2011. Petition expires Aug 3, 2011.
Ordained as Amended 7-1-1 (Kelley NO; Reeves Present) - Ordinance #1340

APPLICATIONS AND PETITIONS
1. An application was received from Daniel Sullivan, requesting permission for a curb cut at the premises numbered 12 Milton Street; said petition has received approval from Inspectional Services, Traffic, Parking and Transportation and Public Works. No response has been received from the neighborhood association.

2. An application was received from The Fullbridge Program, requesting permission for two signs at the premises numbered 25 Mount Auburn Street and 12 Arrow Street. Approval has been received from Inspectional Services, Department of Public Works, Community Development, Historical Commission and abutters.

3. A zoning petition has been received from Laura Runkel, et al., requesting the City Council to amend the Zoning Map by rezoning an area on the southern border to North Cambridge from its C1-A designation to residential C.
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee

4. A zoning petition has been received from Chestnut Hill Realty, requesting the City Council to amend the Zoning Ordinance by creating a new section that would allow for the creation of rental apartment units in the basement levels of existing multifamily residential buildings in Residence C Districts within two tenths of a mile from Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge Street or a Red Line station and must be within 1200 feet of a shared car or rental car location.
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee

5. A zoning petition has been received from Matthew Bagedonow, et al., requesting the City Council to amend section 5.24 Yards for Zoning District C-1 by adding 5.24.(4).
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee

6. An application was received from Dwelltime, requesting permission for a sign at the premises numbered 364 Broadway. Approval has been received from Inspectional Services, Department of Public Works, Community Development and abutters.
[Note: This was NOT approved by abutters and was opposed by the neighborhood association. It passed on a voice vote with only Councillor Toomey voting NO.]

7. A zoning petition has been received from Julia Bishop, et al., requesting the City Council to amend the Zoning Ordinance by rezoning Special District 2 in North Cambridge to more closely reflect its Residence B base zoning.
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee

8. An application was received from Work Out World, requesting permission for a sandwich board sign in front of premises numbered Concord Avenue and Smith Place.

9. An application was received from Harvard Square Business Association, requesting permission for two temporary banners across Massachusetts Avenue at City Hall and JFK Street at Mount Auburn Street announcing Oktoberfest.

10. A zoning petition has been received from Charles D. Teague, et al., requesting the City Council to amend the Zoning Ordinance by enabling enforcement of the already existing lighting restrictions.
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee

11. A zoning petition has been received from Linda G. Andrews, et al., requesting the City Council to amend the Zoning Ordinance by restating the Inclusionary Housing Provisions.
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee

12. A zoning petition has been received from Elizabeth M. de Rham, et al., requesting the City Council to amend the Zoning Ordinance by adjusting the existing ability of the Superintendent of Buildings to issue fines for violations of the Zoning Ordinance.
Referred to Planning Board and Ordinance Committee

COMMUNICATIONS
1. A communication was received from the family of Antonio Martins, transmitting thanks for your thoughtfulness during this time of sorrow.

2. Two communications were received from Peter Valentine, transmitting information on "A Precise Constitution" and "You Are the Final Frontier".

3. A communication was received from Renata von Tscharner, President, Charles River Conservancy, regarding EF Development in North Point Park.

4. A communication was received Travis McCready, Executive Director, Kendall Square Association, transmitting Kendall Square Development and Transportation Principles Adopted by the Kendall Square Association.

5. A communication was received from Robert Winters, 366 Broadway, regarding proposed signage for 364 Broadway over the public way. (Applications and Petitions #6)

6. A communication was received from James M. Williamson, 1000 Jackson Place, regarding the proposed new bike rental program, with zoning changes.


7. A communication was received from Heather Hoffman, 213 Hurley Street, regarding Section 5.28.2 Conversion of non residential structure to residential use.


RESOLUTIONS
1. Resolution on the death of Clyde D. Dottin Sr.   Mayor Maher

2. Resolution on the death of John J. Serpa.   Councillor Toomey

3. Resolution on the death of Joseph C. Drake.   Mayor Maher

4. Resolution on the death of George W. Simmons.   Councillor Toomey, Mayor Maher

5. Resolution on the death of Paul V. Conley.   Mayor Maher

6. Resolution on the death of Jean M. (Wright) Fopiano.   Mayor Maher

7. Resolution on the death of James W. Harrison.   Councillor Toomey

8. Resolution on the death of Sandra Pressley.   Councillor Simmons

9. Resolution on the death of Kay A. (Plona) Grossi.   Mayor Maher

10. Resolution on the death of Jean A. (Sorrentino) Presho.   Councillor Toomey

11. Resolution on the death of Virginia M. (Moran) Hurley.   Councillor Toomey, Mayor Maher

12. Resolution on the death of Katherine Bachrach.   Mayor Maher

13. Resolution on the death of Herman T. Andrade.   Councillor Toomey

14. Resolution on the death of Antonio O. Figueiredo.   Councillor Toomey, Councillor Seidel

15. Resolution on the death of Blandina (Sutton) Arsenault.   Mayor Maher

16. Resolution on the death of Beatrice G. (Taylor) Karp.   Councillor Toomey

17. Resolution on the death of Elizabeth M. Senecal.   Mayor Maher, Councillor Toomey

18. Resolution on the death of James L. Carbone.   Councillor Toomey, Councillor Simmons

19. Resolution on the death of Constantina Comnenou.   Mayor Maher

20. Resolution on the death of Scott Ryan Daley.   Mayor Maher

21. Resolution on the death of Giovanna (Rinaldo) Falcucci.   Councillor Toomey

22. Resolution on the death of Mary (Voto) DiPietro.   Councillor Toomey, Mayor Maher

23. Congratulations to Laurance Vernon Kimbrough and Meredith Blake Hubbell on their recent marriage.   Vice Mayor Davis

24. Resolution on the death of Edna (Murphy) Dasilva.   Councillor Toomey, Mayor Maher

25. Resolution on the death of Myra (Hiatt) Kraft.   Councillor Toomey, Councillor Simmons

26. Happy 80th Birthday wishes to Addie Mae Laycox.   Councillor Toomey

27. Resolution on the death of Jean K. (Langley) Caddigan.   Mayor Maher

28. Resolution on the death of Irene A. Frongillo.   Mayor Maher

29. Resolution on the death of Jean (Saltonstall) Haussermann.   Councillor Toomey

30. Retirement of Earl Green from the Cambridge Housing Authority.   Mayor Maher

31. Retirement of Karen Ebbitt from the Human Services Department.   Mayor Maher

32. Retirement of Lawrence Mitza from the Electrical Department.   Mayor Maher

33. Retirement of Laura Stone from the Human Services Department.   Mayor Maher

34. Congratulations to Andrew Pace on his graduation from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy.   Councillor Toomey

35. Thanks to Robert W. Healy, City Manager, and Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager for Community Development, for their efforts in returning Biogen Idec Inc. to the City of Cambridge and welcome Biogen Idec Inc. back to Cambridge.   Councillor Toomey

36. Congratulations to the City of Somerville for being the inaugural winner in the Let's Move Cities and Towns category of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy Living Innovation Awards.   Councillor Toomey

37. Resolution on the death of Dorothy F. (Arcana) Costello.   Mayor Maher

38. Acknowledge the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Cape Cod national seashore as a national park.   Councillor Simmons

39. Congratulations to Darnell Williams, Director of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts, for a great annual conference.   Councillor Simmons

40. Congratulations to Brian Corr on his appointment as Executive Secretary of the Police Review and Advisory Board.   Councillor Simmons

41. Congratulations to Colleen Johnston on being appointed Executive Director of the Cambridge Human Rights Commission.   Councillor Simmons

42. Congratulations to Sean and Janelle Bradshaw on the birth of their daughter Simeon.   Councillor Simmons

43. Congratulations to Sheila Keady Rawson on being appointed Acting Director of Personnel and Labor Relations.   Councillor Simmons

44. Congratulations to Trudy Morris and George Physic on their upcoming marriage.   Councillor Simmons

45. Happy Birthday wishes to Maria Jobin-Leeds.   Councillor Simmons

46. Congratulations to the newly independent Republic of South Sudan.   Councillor Simmons

47. Resolution on the death of Staff Sergeant Russell Jeremiah Proctor.   Councillor Decker
48. Resolution on the death of Specialist Matthew Ryan Gallagher.   Councillor Decker
49. Resolution on the death of Private First Class Dylan Jeffrey Johnson.   Councillor Decker
50. Resolution on the death of Specialist Robert Gregory Tenney Jr.   Councillor Decker
51. Resolution on the death of Captain David Edward Van Camp.   Councillor Decker
52. Resolution on the death of Captain Matthew Gunnar Nielson.   Councillor Decker
53. Resolution on the death of Specialist Nathan Ryan Beyers.   Councillor Decker
54. Resolution on the death of Specialist Nicholas Wayne Newby.   Councillor Decker
55. Resolution on the death of Sergeant Steven Luna.   Councillor Decker
56. Resolution on the death of Specialist Daniel L. Elliott.   Councillor Decker
57. Resolution on the death of Sergeant Mark A. Cofield.   Councillor Decker

58. Welcome the second annual BuildEthiopia Conference to Cambridge on Oct 21-22, 2011.   Mayor Maher, Councillor Toomey

59. Congratulations to Wendy Jacob on winning the Museum of Fine Art's 2011 Maud Morgan Prize.   Mayor Maher, Councillor Toomey

60. Speedy recovery wishes to Rocco DiBiase.   Mayor Maher

61. Thanks to Jessica Hedges for her participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
62. Thanks to Hector Pineiro for his participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
63. Thanks to Lawyer Johnson for his participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
64. Thanks to Natashia Tidwell for her participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
65. Thanks to David Milton for his participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
66. Thanks to Professor Charles Ogletree for his participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
67. Thanks to MIT for its participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
68. Thanks to the Cambridge Community Center for its participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
69. Thanks to CCTV for its participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
70. Thanks to the Massasoit Elks Club Lodge #129 for its participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves
71. Thanks to the Margaret Fuller Neighborhood House for its participation in the Not Guilty Community Conversation on July 20, 2011.   Councillor Reeves

72. Congratulations to the Cambridge Economic Opportunity Committee (CEOC) on their 45th anniversary.   Councillor Toomey

73. Congratulations to the National Association of Asian American Professionals (NAAAP) for twenty-five years of service.   Councillor Cheung

74. Congratulations to Brian Halligan and Craig Wheeler on receiving the Entrepreneur of the Year New England award from Ernst & Young.   Councillor Cheung

75. Congratulations to Sarah Bennett and Andrew Whitehill on their recent marriage.   Councillor Toomey

76. Resolution on the death of Olga (Kondell) Pettiglio.   Councillor Toomey

77. Congratulations to Steven Stites and Angela Verardo on their engagement.   Councillor Seidel

78. Appreciation to anonymous donor to Healthworks at St. Mary's in Dorchester.   Councillor Seidel

79. Resolution on the death of Sister Julia Breheny, CSJ.   Councillor Toomey

80. Congratulations to Evans Auguste on being named the 2011 Taxi Driver of the Year.   Mayor Maher

81. Congratulations to Mark and Nancy Bonassera on the birth of their daughter Gabriella.   Mayor Maher

82. Congratulations to Julien Buck and Sophia Guthrie on completion of their cross-country biking odyssey.   Councillor Seidel

83. Resolution on the death of Oswald N. Harding.   Councillor Reeves

84. Congratulations to the Cambridge Main Public Library on checking out more than one million items in a single year.   Councillor Decker

85. Retirement of Brenda Boyd from the City Clerk's Office.   Mayor Maher

86. Resolution on the death of John J. "Jack" Dowd.   Councillor Toomey

87. Welcome Boomerangs to Central Square.   Councillor Reeves

88. Resolution on the birth of Tristan Peter Bairos.   Councillor Toomey


89. Condolences to Roseanne DeStefano on the death of her mother.   Mayor Maher

90. Resolution on the death of Margaret M. "Peg" (McNamara) McKeigue.   Mayor Maher

91. Resolution on the death of Leston "Les" Laycock Havens, M.D.   Mayor Maher

92. Resolution on the death of Leona B. (Hinkson) Weems.   Mayor Maher

93. Resolution on the death of Gerald Rego.   Councillor Toomey

94. Resolution on the death of Eric J. Phillips.   Councillor Toomey

95. Happy 95th Birthday wishes to Carl Barron.   Councillor Reeves, Mayor Maher

96. Resolution on the death of Mary Misch Newmann.   Mayor Maher

97. Resolution on the death of Thomas K. Zebrak.   Mayor Maher

98. Resolution on the death of Lieutenant Timothy Oliveira of the Salisbury Fire Department.   Mayor Maher

99. Best wishes to Xylem on their Grand Opening Celebration on August 5, 2011.   Councillor Toomey


ORDERS
1. That the City Manager is requested to report back to the City Council and the Finance Committee on a Technology Plan for the city.   Councillor Decker

2. That the City Manager is requested to report back to the City Council on what would be the advantage of creating a research and development office for technology and to provide a timeline for creation of this office, similar to the Urban Mechanics Department in Boston.   Councillor Decker

3. That the City Manager is requested to review Seeclickfix or any other innovative technology that would connect the city to social media and interactive technology that would engage the public in government.   Councillor Decker

4. That the City Manager is requested to report back to the City Council on the plans for Cambridge's participation in the BIO 2012 Convention.   Councillor Toomey

5. That the City Manager is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to ensure that the City applies for the Rooftop Solar Challenge program.   Councillor Cheung

6. That the City Manager is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to ascertain the best method for slowing traffic on Tremont Street and report back to the City Council with a course of action.   Councillor Cheung

7. That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to ascertain the best method for slowing traffic on Linnaean Street and report back to the City Council with a course of action.   Councillor Cheung

8. That the City Manager is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to look into the need for a bamboo ordinance that either bans the planting of bamboo outright or somehow holds the owner of the bamboo accountable if a bamboo infestation were to occur.   Councillor Cheung

9. That the City Manager is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to look into the feasibility and possible benefits of Cambridge participating in the UN Global Compact Cities program and report back to the City Council with a course of action.   Councillor Cheung

10. That the City Council go on record opposing the selling of naming rights for MBTA Stations.   Councillor Toomey

11. That the City Council go on record opposing the MassDOT plans to use the Grand Junction for Commuter Rail traffic.   Councillor Toomey
Amended

12. That the City Manager is requested to designate the appropriate parties to set up a system to offer Cambridge tap water to drink at city events such as Danehy Park Day.   Vice Mayor Davis

13. That the City Council go on record as urging the Governor, the Cambridge Legislative Delegation and the Registrar of Motor Vehicles to establish appropriate administrative procedures to back up police officers who write tickets to bicyclists committing moving violations.   Vice Mayor Davis

14. That the City Manager is requested to direct the City Solicitor to provide the City Council with suggested rule changes that would, if possible, create a set of Council rules that would preclude the current perceived need to waive the rules so consistently to conduct Council business.   Councillor Kelley
Amended, then Failed on a voice vote

15. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the relevant City agencies and report back to the City Council on the feasibility of the City being able to create a system where all official documents such as building permits, variance applications, License Commission inspection results and other similar information could be tied to a unique property identifier, such as an address, and be available to the general public when searched by that unique identifier.   Councillor Kelley

16. That the City Manager is requested to ensure that there is sufficient information on the City's website available through a search for "bedbug" for members of the public to quickly determine who they should contact from the City to help them alleviate bedbug threats and to ascertain what the City's role in alleviating bedbug threats in Cambridge.   Councillor Kelley

17. That the City Manager is requested to establish a committee to determine an appropriate commemoration in Cambridge of the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation.   Councillor Simmons

18. That the City Manager is requested to work with the relevant departments to increase enforcement of weight restrictions on Cambridge roadways as well as improve signage alerting motorists to weight restrictions on roadways where such restrictions are in place.   Councillor Simmons

19. That the City Council go on record in opposition to closing the Inman Square Post Office, the MIT Post Office, or any other Post Office in the City of Cambridge.   Councillor Toomey
Amended

20. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Cambridge Housing Authority and the Cambridge Police Department staff and report back to the City Council on any issues with fireworks at Corcoran Park.   Councillor Kelley

21. That the City Manager is requested to confirm with the appropriate departments and report back to the City Council on the feasibility of repaving Antrim Street.   Councillor Cheung

22. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to look into the feasibility of allowing residents to pay for the requisition and installation of bike racks in residential areas.   Councillor Cheung

23. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to investigate the lack of a bike lane and the unsafe car traffic on Blanchard Road.   Councillor Cheung

24. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments and report back on the feasibility of installing a speed bump on Tremont Street.   Councillor Cheung
Amended

25. That the City Manager is requested to incorporate information regarding safe bicycling in the City with the dissemination of information related to, and implementation of, the Hubway bike share program.   Councillor Seidel

26. That the City Manager is requested to ask the relevant City departments to examine all street poles on the section of Massachusetts Avenue between Harvard and Porter Squares and clean and remove flyers, notices, graffiti and other debris from these poles.   Councillor Seidel

27. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Community Development Department and other relevant City staff to examine the relationship between job creation in the City and available housing stock in Cambridge over the past three decades.   Councillor Seidel
Amended

28. That the City Council requests an update by its relevant members as to the status of a committee hearing on security cameras.   Councillor Kelley

29. That the City Manager is requested to look further into the use of BLAZE technology and its practical implementation in the City of Cambridge and any other options to further guarantee the safety of bicyclists.   Councillor Decker

30. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Commissioner of Public Works to evaluate the safety of the elevator in the City Hall and resolve any issues it may have.   Councillor Decker

31. That the City Manager is requested to communicate to the Cambridge Human Services Department about the Cambridge Office of College Success Initiative Working Group Draft and to attempt to initiate it this fall.   Councillor Reeves

32. That the City Manager is requested to report on the rationale behind why there are so many "No Turn on Red" signs in the city at intersections where residents would otherwise feel safe to turn right on red.   Councillor Cheung

33. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to investigate Styrofoam recycling options and report back to the City Council with recommendations.   Councillor Cheung


34. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Assistant City Manager of Community Development and report back on how the delay of the Green Line Extension could impact the development at Northpoint.   Councillor Toomey

35. That the City Manager is requested to confer with the Commissioner of Public Works and report back on the City's policy on allowing markings on sidewalks to promote events, designate routes and advertise the Cambridgeside Galleria and when the Cambridgeside Galleria will be removing them after the event.   Councillor Toomey

36. That the following documents relating to the decriminalization of marijuana are forwarded to the Ordinance Committee for a hearing and report: Public Safety Committee Reports for meetings held on October 20, 2010 and May 10, 2011.   Councillor Kelley

37. That his Honor, the Mayor, is requested to discuss with the School Committee the necessity to instituting a marijuana educational campaign at CRLA in an effort to reduce the consumption of marijuana by youth and young adults.   Councillor Simmons


COMMITTEE REPORTS
1. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Marjorie C. Decker, Chair of the Community Health Committee for a public meeting held on Mar 31, 2011 for the purpose of receiving a presentation from the Cambridge Health Alliance on the patient-centered model of care.

2. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor E. Denise Simmons, Chair of the Civic Unity Committee for a public meeting held on May 3, 2011 for the purpose of continuing discussion with the Civic Unity Advisory Committee of the recommendations of the Cambridge Review Committee report.

3. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Leland Cheung, Chair of the University Relations Committee for a public meeting held on Sept 28, 2010 to discuss campus safety in Cambridge.

4. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Marjorie C. Decker, Chair of the Housing Committee for a public meeting held on May 24, 2011 to discuss the availability of and need for single room occupancy housing.

5. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Sam Seidel, Chair of the Ordinance Committee for a public meeting held on July 18, 2011 for the purpose of considering a proposed amendment to the Zoning Ordinance to enable the City's regional bike-share program to site bike-share stations on municipal and private property.
Passed to 2nd Reading

6. A communication was received from Donna P. Lopez, Deputy City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor E. Denise Simmons, Chair of the Public Safety Committee for a public meeting held on May 10, 2011 to receive an update on marijuana use and whether a Municipal Code amendment to prohibit smoking marijuana in public places is needed and plans for maintaining and enhancing public safety during the upcoming summer months.

7. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Sam Seidel, Chair of the Ordinance Committee for a public meeting held on July 18, 2011 to continue to consider proposed amendments to Section 5.28.2 Conversion of Nonresidential Structures to Residential Use and Section 4.29 clarifying the allowance of additional uses as permissible under Section 5.28.2.

8. A communication was received from D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk, transmitting a report from Councillor Leland Cheung, Chair of the Economic Development, Training and Employment Committee for a public meeting held on June 28, 2011 for the purpose of discussing the creation of the city's economic development goals.

COMMUNICATIONS AND REPORTS FROM CITY OFFICERS
1. A communication was received from Mayor David P. Maher, transmitting a copy of a letter sent to Attorney General Martha Coakley regarding Neighbors for a Better Community, Inc.

2. A communication was received from Councillor Timothy J. Toomey, informing the City Council that S1955 An Act Relative to Economic Development in the Northpoint Area in the City of Cambridge was enacted by the House of Representatives and the Senate and sent to Governor Deval Patrick for his signature.

HEARING SCHEDULE
Mon, Aug 1
5:30pm   Special City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Tues, Aug 2
6:00pm   School Committee Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Sept 12
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Sept 19
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Sept 26
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Tues, Sept 27
2:00pm   The University Relations Committee will conduct a public meeting to choose goals to recommend to the City Council for FY 13.  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 3
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 17
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 24
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Oct 31
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 7
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 14
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 21
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Nov 28
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 5
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 12
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

Mon, Dec 19
5:30pm   City Council Meeting  (Sullivan Chamber)

TEXT OF ORDERS
O-1     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR DECKER
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council and the Finance Committee on the following:
  Technology Plan for the city;
  Identifying the use of social media tools such as Gov 2.0; and
  Identifying projects that would benefit using Gov 2.0 Initiative.

O-2     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR DECKER
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on what would be the advantage of creating a research and development office for technology and to provide a timeline for creation of this office, similar to the Urban Mechanics Department in Boston.

O-3     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR DECKER
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to review Seeclickfix or any other innovative technology that would connect the city to social media and interactive technology that would engage the public in government.

O-4     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: The BIO International Convention is returning to Boston in 2012; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge's Kendall Square has long been the ideal place for Biotech and Life Science to locate in Massachusetts; and
WHEREAS: There are efforts in Kendall Square to brand the area as the innovation center of the world; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge is facing increasing competition by other cities and towns and Cambridge must make an aggressive effort to maintain our standing in the Biotech and Life Science field; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge had a great presence at the BIO 2007 International Convention, the last time Boston hosted, and we should expand on our presence in 2012; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on the plans for Cambridge's participation in the BIO 2012 Convention and to report back to the City Council.

O-5     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that the Department of Energy is seeking applicants for the Rooftop Solar Challenge; and
WHEREAS: This national competition will engage diverse teams of local and state governments along with utilities, installers, NGOs, and others to make solar energy more accessible and affordable for residents and businesses. These teams will compete for funds to implement their plan to reduce administrative barriers to residential and small commercial photovoltaic (PV) solar installations by streamlining, standardizing, and digitizing administrative processes; and
WHEREAS: Complex and lengthy permitting and grid connection processes increase the cost of solar energy systems and limit the growth of the solar industry. The objective of the Challenge is to make the process of going solar simpler, faster, and more cost effective for residents and businesses; and
WHEREAS: The Rooftop Solar Challenge will make available up to a total of $12.5 million in funding to as many as 25 teams in the first year. The Challenge is part of DOE's SunShot Initiative, which aims to make solar energy cost-competitive with traditional forms of electricity by reducing the total installed cost of solar energy systems by 75 percent within the decade; and
WHEREAS: The City of Cambridge would greatly benefit from participation in this program. Applications for this project are due by Aug 31, 2011, with Letters of Intent due July 29, 2011; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to ensure that the City applies for the before mentioned program and report back to the City Council.

O-6     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that motorists are speeding on Tremont Street, near the intersection with Gardner Road, putting pedestrians and fellow motorists at risk; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to ascertain the best method for slowing traffic at this location and report back to the City Council with a course of action.

O-7     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that motorists are speeding on Linnaean Street, in front of Graham and Parks School, putting pedestrians at risk, particularly young students; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to ascertain the best method for slowing traffic and report back to the City Council with a course of action.

O-8     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that some residents have chosen to plant bamboo in their backyard; and
WHEREAS: Bamboo is not native to the United States and generally is not grown in urban or residential areas; and
WHEREAS: There have been concerns raised by the neighbors of those who planted the bamboo that said bamboo is beginning to spread beyond the parameters of the property and is causing damage to a neighbor's garage and devaluing the surrounding properties; and
WHEREAS: The City of Cambridge currently does not have any ordinances or policies that regulate the planting of and maintenance of bamboo on private property; and
WHEREAS: Every effort should be made to ensure that a bamboo infestation does not occur. Because bamboo is so aggressive, it can re-establish rapidly if any small section is left untouched. The planting of bamboo of a single bamboo stalk can easily cause an infestation that can take several years to rectify; and
WHEREAS: It is absolutely critical that residents wanting to raise bamboo understand the risks and that a process is put in place by the City that protects neighbors in case an infestation occurs; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and is hereby requested to direct the appropriate department heads to develop a process that distributes information about proper bamboo maintenance to interested residents; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and is hereby requested to direct the appropriate department heads to look into the need for a bamboo ordinance that either bans the planting of bamboo outright or somehow holds the owner of the bamboo accountable if a bamboo infestation were to occur and report back to the City Council on this matter.

O-9     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: The UN Global Compact Cities Programme is an urban-focused component of the UN Global Compact. Based on the premise that any city, anywhere, contains the capacity to resolve the issues it faces, the Global Cities program offers a framework for building constructive, all-sector task forces among business, government and civil society, to produce practical responses in areas where single-sector initiatives have previously failed; and
WHEREAS: The development of new, progressive methodologies such as the Global Cities program has become increasingly critical in the twenty-first century as urban populations outnumber rural growth for the first time and new, complex challenges emerge. Combining the ideas, knowledge, experience and resources inherent within all three sectors offers a powerful, unique and unlimited capacity to effect change and address these challenges in areas such as waste management, water and sanitation, poverty alleviation, traffic safety and housing re-developments; and
WHEREAS: The Global Cities program provides new perspective to city leaders who are tackling a complexity of urban issues. Supported by the research work derived from Global Cities Research Institute at RMIT University, the Global Cities program offers cities opportunity to adopt a holistic approach that includes a self assessment which identifies a city's awareness and understanding of the issue overtime; and
WHEREAS: Participants in the Global Cities program enjoy access to a broad range of benefits, including:

WHEREAS: The cities of San Francisco, Milwaukee and Cleveland are already members, and it would greatly benefit Cambridge to also become involved; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to direct the appropriate department heads to look into the feasibility and possible benefits of Cambridge participating in the before mentioned program and report back to the City Council with a course of action.

O-10     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: The MBTA is currently exploring the possibility of selling the naming rights of MBTA Stations; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge is the home of six MBTA Stations that could potentially be affected; and
WHEREAS: The names of these stations have both historical and geographical meaning; and
WHEREAS: A re-branding of these stations could negatively impact the historical and geographical value of the current names; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Council go on record opposing the selling of naming rights for MBTA Stations; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward a suitably engrossed copy of this resolution to the MBTA on behalf of the entire City Council.

O-11     Aug 1, 2011  Amended
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: The Massachusetts Department of Transportation's (MassDOT) plan to use the Grand Junction Railroad to carry Commuter Rail Trains could have a serious impact on the resident of Cambridge and Somerville; and
WHEREAS: MassDOT is engaged in public outreach in order to keep residents informed of the potential use of the Grand Junction; and
WHEREAS: Most feedback being received at these public meetings is in opposition to this concept; and
WHEREAS: MassDOT is currently working on a ridership study that will help to understand the feasibility of this project and its potential of becoming a reality; and
WHEREAS: Among the biggest concerns are traffic, public safety, and environmental impacts; and
WHEREAS: The ability to create a multi use path along this corridor that will connect neighborhoods will also be greatly compromised; now therefore be it
RESOLVED: That the City Council go on record opposing the MassDOT plans to use the Grand Junction for Commuter Rail traffic; and be it further
RESOLVED: That His Honor, the Mayor, be and hereby is requested to arrange for a breakfast meeting and invite the Massachusetts Delegation and officials from the City of Somerville to discuss this matter further; and be it further
RESOLVED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward a suitably engrossed copy of this resolution to the Massachusetts Department of Transportation on behalf of the entire City Council.

O-12     Aug 1, 2011
VICE MAYOR DAVIS
WHEREAS: The City has adopted a policy to restrict the use of bottled water at city events; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to designate the appropriate parties to set up a system to offer Cambridge tap water to drink at city events such as Danehy Park Day.

O-13     Aug 1, 2011
VICE MAYOR DAVIS
WHEREAS: Cambridge will soon participate in a metro regional bike-sharing program; and
WHEREAS: The bike-share program will offer a healthy and environmentally friendly option for getting around the city; and
WHEREAS: The bike-share program will invite residents and visitors-some of whom do not know the rules of the road for bicyclists-to use bikes to get around rather than cars; and
WHEREAS: Education and enforcement will be important elements for the bike-share program to be successful; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report to the entire City Council on what information campaign will be established to go along with the bike-share program to orient bicyclists and motorists to the roles of the road relating to bikes; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Council go on record as urging the Governor, the Cambridge Legislative Delegation and the Registrar of Motor Vehicles to establish appropriate administrative procedures to back up police officers who write tickets to bicyclists committing moving violations such as running red lights and failing to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to a suitably engrossed copy of this resolution to Governor Deval Patrick, the Cambridge legislative delegation, and the Registrar of Motor Vehicles on behalf of the entire City Council.

O-14     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
WHEREAS: The Cambridge City Council often suspends its rules to allow for late Orders, late Resolutions and immediate Reconsiderations; and
WHEREAS: Such rule suspension limits public participation in Council affairs; and
WHEREAS: Such rule suspension happens so often as to bring into question the purpose of these particular rules in the first place; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to direct the City Solicitor to provide the City Council with suggested rule changes that would, if possible, create a set of Council rules that would preclude the current perceived need to waive the rules so consistently to conduct Council business; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to direct the City Solicitor to give the City Council guidance, should he be unable to draft such language, on the legality of the Council's constant suspending its rules for late Orders, late Resolutions and immediate Reconsiderations.

O-15     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
WHEREAS: There is a variety of information available on the City's website for most individual pieces of property; and
WHEREAS: This information is available in disparate pieces which makes it difficult for someone to find out what sort of permits and applications and related plans exist for any property; and
WHEREAS: The Community Development Department has an example of what sort of information might reasonably be expected to be available for all properties and projects, not just for projects subject to a Special Permit; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the relevant City agencies and report back to the City Council on the feasibility of the City being able to create a system where all official documents such as building permits, variance applications, License Commission inspection results and other similar information could be tied to a unique property identifier, such as an address, and be available to the general public when searched by that unique identifier.

O-16     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
WHEREAS: There has recently been much concern about bedbugs in Cambridge, whether in individual buildings, in furniture left on the street or in response to the importance of trained hotel workers; and
WHEREAS: Bedbug infestations are likely to increase in frequency; and
WHEREAS: It is not easy for the general public to find out how Cambridge handles bedbug threats (in fact, a recent search for "bedbug" on the City's website only turned up two results, neither of which included any sort of instructions on how citizens should work with the City to address bedbug concerns); and
WHEREAS: An Oct 26, 2009 City Council Order states: "That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to instruct the Cambridge Public Health Department to work with the Cambridge Housing Authority, the Department of Human Services and the Multi-Service Center to address bedbug extermination protocol and the associated costs for residents"; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to ensure that there is sufficient information on the City's website available through a search for "bedbug" for members of the public to quickly determine who they should contact from the City to help them alleviate bedbug threats and to ascertain what the City's role in alleviating bedbug threats in Cambridge is; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on this matter.

O-17     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR SIMMONS
WHEREAS: The 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation signed by president Abraham Lincoln on Jan 1, 1863, will be celebrated in 2013; and
WHEREAS: Although the Emancipation Proclamation applied only to areas under confederate control, and failed to end the institution of slavery in the US, the Emancipation Proclamation signaled a turning point in the effort to abolish slavery in the United States; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to establish a committee to determine an appropriate commemoration in the City of Cambridge of the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation; and be it further
ORDERED: That the Committee should include representatives from the Historical Commission, the Cambridge Public Schools District, the African American community in Cambridge, and Cambridge residents who are interested in participating.

O-18     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR SIMMONS
WHEREAS: Weight restrictions on Cambridge roadways are intended to minimize wear and tear on these roads; and
WHEREAS: Weight restrictions are also meant to increase the safety of other motorists operating on Cambridge roadways; and
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that heavy trucks have been seen driving down Rindge Avenue in violation of the weight restriction on Rindge Avenue; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to work with the relevant departments to increase enforcement of weight restrictions on Cambridge roadways as well as improve signage alerting motorists to weight restrictions on roadways where such restrictions are in place.

O-19     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that there are plans to close 43 Post Office branches within Massachusetts; and
WHEREAS: The Inman Square Post Office is once again being reviewed as a possible closure; and
WHEREAS: The Inman Square Post Office branch serves a great number of Cambridge residents and businesses and serves an elderly population that relies on a walkable location; and
WHEREAS: This location is a valuable resource that should be maintained for our residents; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Council go on record in opposition to closing the Inman Square Post Office and the MIT Post Office or any other Post Office in the City of Cambridge; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Clerk be and hereby is requested to forward a suitably engrossed copy of this resolution to the Postmaster and the Inman Square Business Association and MIT on behalf of the entire City Council.

O-20     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
WHEREAS: On July 4, 2011 there were complaints of a massive amount of fireworks were set off at the Corcoran Park Housing Development; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge Housing Authority and Cambridge Police Department staff were unable to explain what had happened or respond to the complaints in a timely fashion; and
WHEREAS: Private use of fireworks poses a variety of dangers to people and property; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Cambridge Housing Authority and the Cambridge Police Department staff and report back to the City Council on any issues with fireworks at Corcoran Park and how such issues will be proactively addressed in the future.

O-21     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that there have been reports of deteriorating road conditions on Antrim Street and that residents feel that the roads should be repaved in order to improve the situation, not simply repaired as has been done; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confirm with the appropriate departments and report back to the City Council on the feasibility of repaving Antrim Street to rectify the before-mentioned issue.

O-22     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that residents have inquired about the possibility of individually purchasing bike racks found in commercial areas of the city for installation by the city in residential areas; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to look into the feasibility of allowing residents to pay for the requisition and installation of bike racks in residential areas and report back to the City Council with a recommendations for such a program if appropriate.

O-23     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the Cambridge City Council that residents are concerned about the lack of a bike lane and the unsafe car traffic on Blanchard Road as a result of commuters avoiding Route 2; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested confer with the appropriate departments to investigate the before-mentioned issue and report back to the City Council with recommendations.

O-24     Aug 1, 2011  Amended
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that residents are concerned about speeding at the intersection of Carlisle Street and Tremont Street; and
WHEREAS: It has been reported that motorists drive so quickly that pedestrians and residents living on Tremont Street feel unsafe parking, walking and getting out of their vehicle; and
WHEREAS: Some residents feel that a speed bump would alleviate speeding and improve the quality of public safety; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate departments and report back on the feasibility of installing a speed bump on Tremont Street to rectify the before-mentioned issue.

O-25     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR SEIDEL
WHEREAS: New Balance Hubway, the City of Boston's regional bike share program is currently being implemented; and
WHEREAS: This program will initially bring approximately 610 bicycles to about 60 rental kiosks in and around the area; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge is working towards facilitating the implementation of the program across the City; and
WHEREAS: Boston has also developed a new enforcement and education campaign to promote safe behavior among cyclists and drivers in preparation for the City's launch of the new bike-share program; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge has a number of programs which focus on bike safety, including TROMP; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to incorporate information regarding safe bicycling in the City with the dissemination of information related to, and implementation of, the Hubway bike share program.

O-26     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR SEIDEL
WHEREAS: There has been a productive planning process concerning the area on Massachusetts Avenue between Harvard and Porter Squares; and
WHEREAS: This planning process which was begun by representatives from the Agassiz Neighborhood and Neighborhood 9, now includes not only residents but staff from the Community Development Department, local business owners and representatives from Harvard and Lesley Universities; and
WHEREAS: During recent meetings of this planning group business owners commented on the condition of utility and other poles along this section of Massachusetts Avenue, many of which are covered with outdated flyers, notices and advertisements; and
WHEREAS: The Council appreciates the good work of this planning group in working to improve the stretch of Massachusetts Avenue between Harvard and Porter Squares; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to ask the relevant City departments to examine all street poles on this section of Massachusetts Avenue and clean and remove from these poles all outdated flyers, graffiti and other debris.

O-27     Aug 1, 2011  Amended
COUNCILLOR SEIDEL
WHEREAS: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has recently issued a plan to develop approximately one million square feet in Kendall Square for business, retail and housing use; and
WHEREAS: When land is being developed on such a large scale for different uses it therefore has potentially multiple impacts; and
WHEREAS: In the course of discussions in the Ordinance Committee, the question of the relationship between job creation and housing creation was raised; and
WHEREAS: As jobs are created in Cambridge, the location, proximity and cost of housing is a relevant concern; and
WHEREAS: Cambridge has seen development proposals, particularly in the Kendall Square area over the past two decades, that will add millions of square feet of commercial space and offer many employment opportunities in the City; and
WHEREAS: The MIT proposal will create additional square feet of commercial space in Cambridge; and
WHEREAS: Residential development has also been identified as a key component in developing "24 hour" neighborhoods; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Community Development Department and other relevant City staff to examine the relationship between job creation in the City and available housing stock in Cambridge over the past three decades; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested, in consultation with relevant departments, to propose a framework(s) for a policy on the relationship between job creation and housing creation in the City of Cambridge; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager report back to the City Council on this matter.

O-28     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
ORDERED: That the City Council be and hereby requests an update by its relevant members as to the status of a committee hearing on security cameras.

O-29     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR DECKER
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of this City Council that encouraging bicycle safety is a major concern amongst residents and the Cambridge City Council; and
WHEREAS: The city is in the process of trying to expand the utilization of bicycling as an alternative to cars and driving; and
WHEREAS: There is the potential of utilizing new technology to assist in the safety of cyclists and the awareness of drivers; and
WHEREAS: A tool to help increase bike safety might be found in BLAZE, a device invented by Emily Brooke, a final-year Product Design student at the University of Brighton; and
WHEREAS: The device alerts drivers to the presence of bikers by projecting a laser image onto the road in front of the bicycle; and
WHEREAS: To make bikers more visible, the handlebar-mounted device projects a bright green, diamond-shaped shared lane symbol on the pavement, several feet in front of the cyclist. The symbol, even visible in daylight, can be made to flash on and off; and
WHEREAS: The idea is that motorists will notice the green image on the road and take precaution, even if they don't see the cyclist in their blind spot; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested look further into the use of this technology and its practical implementation in the City of Cambridge and any other options to further guarantee the safety of bicyclists; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on this matter.

O-30     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR DECKER
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of this City Council that the elevator in the City Hall has malfunctioned and has become stuck in between floors more than once in recent months; and
WHEREAS: City employees have been trapped inside of the elevator on more than one occasion; and
WHEREAS: It is important for the well-being and safety of employees and visitors to the City Hall that the elevator be in proper working order; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Commissioner of Public Works to evaluate the safety of the elevator in the City Hall and resolve any issues it may have; and be it further
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report back to the City Council on this matter.

O-31     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR REEVES
WHEREAS: The Cambridge Human Services Department has initiated the Cambridge Office of College Success Initiative Working Group Draft; and
WHEREAS: The Cambridge Human Services Department has created a draft budget for the Cambridge Office of College Success Initiative Working Group Draft; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to communicate to the Cambridge Human Services Department about the Cambridge Office of College Success Initiative Working Group Draft and to attempt to initiate it this fall and to report back to the Council on the progress of the project.

O-32     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that there are "No Turn on Red" signs at many intersections that some residents feel would not be marked as such in other cities; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to report on the rationale behind why there are so many "No Turn on Red" signs in the city at intersections where residents would otherwise feel safe to turn right on red.

O-33     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR CHEUNG
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that residents are looking for ways to recycle Styrofoam in order to cut down on waste; now therefore be it
ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the appropriate departments to investigate Styrofoam recycling options and report back to the City Council with recommendations.


O-34     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: It has come to the attention of the City Council that the projected completion of the Green Line Extension has been adjusted to 2018-2020; and
WHEREAS: A successful development of Northpoint is intrinsically tied to the completion of the Green Line Extension and this delay could have negative impacts on the development; now therefore be it
RESOLVED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Assistant City Manager of Community Development and report back on how this delay could impact the development at Northpoint.

O-35     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR TOOMEY
WHEREAS: The Cambridgeside Galleria has recently used sidewalk markings in an effort to promote their duathalon event, designate the duathalon route and advertise the Cambridgeside Galleria; and
ORDERED: The markings appear to be spray-painted on the sidewalk and residents have expressed their concern about how long the marking will be there after the event; now therefore be it ORDERED: That the City Manager be and hereby is requested to confer with the Commissioner of Public Works and report back on the City's policy on allowing these types of markings and when the Cambridgeside Galleria will be removing them after the event.

O-36     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR KELLEY
ORDERED: That the following documents relating to the decriminalization of marijuana are forwarded to the Ordinance Committee for a hearing and report: Public Safety Committee Reports for meetings held on October 20, 2010 and May 10, 2011.

O-37     Aug 1, 2011
COUNCILLOR SIMMONS
ORDERED: That his Honor, the Mayor, be and hereby is requested to discuss with the School Committee the necessity to instituting a marijuana educational campaign at CRLA in an effort to reduce the consumption of marijuana by youth and young adults.


TEXT OF COMMITTEE REPORTS
Committee Report #1
The Community Health Committee held a public meeting on Mar 31, 2011 beginning at eleven o'clock and seventeen minutes A.M. in the Sullivan Chamber. The meeting was held for the purpose of receiving a presentation from the Cambridge Health Alliance on the patient-centered model of care.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Marjorie C. Decker, Chair of the Committee; Councillor Leland Cheung; and City Clerk D. Margaret Drury. Also present were Claude Jacob, Cambridge Chief Public Health Officer; and Dr. Karen Hacker, Ph.D. Institute for Community for Community Health; Allison Bayer, Executive Director Vice President/Chief Operating Officer (now Acting CEO) Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA); Dr. Soma Stout, M.D., Medical Director, CHA; Dr. David Osler, M.D., Senior Vice President for Ambulatory Services, CHA; Lynn Budlong, Vice President for Ambulatory Operations and Primary Care, CHA.

Councillor Decker convened the meeting and explained the purpose. She invited Allison Bayer to begin the presentation. Ms. Bayer provided an overview and described the patient-centered model as a way to have patients become engaged with managing their health care. The CHA started this two years ago. Now the CHA is seen as a leader in the emerging field. The CHA sees this model as by far the best way to deliver care.

Dr. Stout stated that the financial crisis made the CHA really thinks about their reason for existing, that is, where the CHA adds value to the health care market place. They realized that their mission is to improve the health of their communities. The United States spends almost twice as much as every other country, yet our outcomes do not reflect this. The United States ranks thirty-seventh in the World Health Organization's ranking of health care systems. Dr. Stout said that they started by talking to their patients about what they (the patients) wanted and needed. By using the patient-centered medical whole person model they found it was the simple things that needed to be fixed, for example, how patients can get to their appointments. They involved a few hundred members of the CHA staff in an exercise in which staff members took the role of patients. Group after group came up with the same ideas, for example, they consistently wanted to know that when they were sick they could see a health provider that they already know. They needed help navigating the process - five (5) different appointments and transportation to these appointments was daunting. Dr. Stout distributed a chart illustrating the major aspects of patient centered care based on a continuous and respectful relationship with a personal physician (Attachment A). Dr. Stout stated that the personal relationship is so important and so many patients need primary care, there must be a practice- based care team (doctor, nurse and medical assistant) to fulfill the needs of an average PCP patient roster. She emphasized that although there are similarities with the managed care approach of the 80s, this is a very different approach to partnering with patients.

Councillor Decker asked if this model has been implemented throughout the entire CHA system. Dr. Stout said that they started with a pilot program at two sites and now they have spread to five (5) of the CHA health centers, with a sixth coming aboard very soon. This is part of a state demonstration project. The next iteration will include the Cambridge Family Health and North Cambridge Health Center.

Councillor Decker said that she is very aware of the demanding scheduling challenges of CHA staff due to the amount of personal attention and care that they give to their patients. She said that implementation of this program requires a lot of time and resources and asked how does this work when the doctors are so swamped with work.

Dr. Stout said that some of the change is about working smarter not harder; for example, more rigor in handling scheduling and making sure they are building in time capacity for emergencies, because emergencies are inevitable. In the two pilots, ninety-two percent of patients wait less than 20 minutes and wait time has dropped from two weeks to five days for regular routine appointments.

One practice realized twenty-five percent (25%) of appointments were not showing up at all, another twenty percent (20%) were canceling. They saw the need to accommodate both types as part of their regular schedule planning. Dr. Osler said that part of it is an understanding of who the patients are and what they need. Right now, the payment incentives are perverse. Doctors get paid for seeing the patients in their offices when e-mail communication might be a better option for both patient and doctor.

Ms. Bayer said that the challenge is how we work with the financial and structural constraints and shift resources to improve the care. Strategic use of technology such as the use of an electronic health record is key. Lots of time was going into calling in for prescription refills. They are working on patient access lines with a trained person who can assist the patient on the phone. Right now all calls go to the front desk.

Councillor Decker noted her personal positive experience with the effectiveness of e-mail communication with her family's health care providers.

Dr. Stout said that they have done some early experiments with group appointments. She said that they are great for patients with the same goals, for example, reducing heart attack risk, etc. Patients can support each other in their goals.

Dr. Osler said that the CHA relationship with the Department of Public Health is an extraordinary resource.

Councillor Decker said that what she as a mother of children who are patients finds most stressful is having to call the pediatrics office during off-hours. There is lots of waiting time. There is the first wait, then you get an answer telling you to call another number and then another wait. Ms. Bayer said that they know that this has to be addressed. Different practices have used different off-hours answering services. Dr. Stout said that Councillor Decker's comments illustrate the importance of having patients on an advisory board.

Councillor Decker said that one of the reasons she has stayed with CHA is to understand the care her constituents are getting. She added that pre-registration phone calls seem to be redundant and more of an annoyance than an added value. Ms. Budlong said that Councillor Decker just addressed two of the major structural issues that have been identified as top priorities for getting fixed. Ms. Bayer said that the intent of the pre-registration was to be more patient friendly at the actual visit, but it obviously needs fixing.

Dr. Stout said that up to now focus has been on great medical care but they have come to realize that unless patients have a good experience they are not going to be able to access great health care.

Councillor Decker said that a patient advisory board is something that she has talked about over the years. She is interested in seeing how the CHA can more effectively educate patients. Ms. Bayer said that the CHA has done some retooling. The state now requires every hospital to have a Patient Family Advisory Council. The CHA had one before it was a requirement.

Ms. Budlong said that they need not just feedback on what does not go well, also about what went well.

Councillor Cheung asked whether the new approach applies to dental care as well. Ms. Bayer said yes, the changes have incorporated dental care into the overall health care picture. The CHA Chief of Dental Care emphasizes that the mouth is connected to the body.

Dr. Stout said that with this new approach, they are on a journey.

Councillor Decker emphasized the importance of the CHA sending the City Council regular updates that include this kind of information. She thanked all those present for their participation. The meeting adjourned at twelve o'clock and twenty-five P.M.

For the Committee,
Councillor Marjorie C. Decker, Chair


Committee Report #2
The Civic Unity Committee held a public meeting on May 3, 2011 beginning at six o'clock and forty-seven minutes P.M. in the Ackermann Room. The meeting was held for the purpose of continuing discussion with the Civic Unity Advisory Committee of the recommendations of the Cambridge Review Committee report.

Present at the meeting were Councillor E. Denise Simmons, Chair of the Committee; Vice Mayor Henrietta Davis; Councillor Kenneth E. Reeves; and City Clerk D. Margaret Drury. Also present were Sally Haslanger, Professor, MIT, 395 Washington Street; Estelle Disch, Professor, University Massachusetts, 528 Franklin Street; Janie Ward, Professor, Simmons College, 30 Parker Street.

Councillor Simmons convened the meeting and explained the purpose. She distributed an agenda (Attachment A) and began with a discussion of "distilled themes" from the report. She noted that the report asked for a central contact person in the police department.

Councillor Reeves said that with regard to class differences he believes there should be a clarification. He also noted the Yuri Stamps incident. A report of the investigation has been released. The explanation in the report is not an explanation. The report said that the police officer did not know whether he pulled the trigger. Councillor Reeves pointed to the focus on police discretion in the Cambridge Review Committee's final report. Police discretion must be accompanied by good judgment.

Professor Haslanger said that in addition to race/class issues, there were town/government issues:

Vice Mayor Davis said that the disorderly conduct issue is a much larger issue than just in our own City. This is something that we should be able to do something about.

Councillor Simmons asked how one could extract race and class from the discussion and added that to her it seem impossible.

Vice Mayor Davis stated that she believes there is a certain closing of ranks after there is an incident. She added that the Cambridge Review Committee Report leaves her with the question of how is it going to be different if it happens again.

Councillor Reeves noted that police culture plays a big role. The City Manager and Police Commissioner attended role calls to assure the police officers that they would be backing the officers.

Dr. Ward said that there is a way in which we can look at this as a continuation. Peoples' fears are most excited by what happened in the Yuri Stamps situation. There may be an opportunity to tie the two conversations together.

Dr. Ward said that the next-to-last bullet on the agenda would read better if an "individual recommendation versus systematic problem" included "boys behaving badly." She added that the remedies are very different.

Councillor Simmons expressed her interest in tying the two conversations together. She said that there is a need to resolve this in a way that reduces the chances of a "next time."

Professor Disch said that Sergeant Crowley never said "I am sorry." Until that happens, they are all in denial.

Professor Haslanger said that she was impressed by the willingness of the Police Commissioner and Deputy Superintendent to admit that the training police receive in the Police Academy to never back down was wrong. But they did not talk about that in connection with race. So they did not go far enough. Councillor Simmons noted her concern with the training issue, especially for lateral hires.

Dr. Ward said that there is a need to do some really careful thinking about police training. It is not clear as to what part of race relations she would like police officers to become aware of.

Professor Haslanger noted the Binaji experiments at Harvard which looked at how the biases we all have affect our fast responses. As a process of increasing self-understanding, that kind of material could be useful. There is also research about how to combat explicit violence.

Vice Mayor Davis suggested getting Professor Banaji to come to talk to the committee.

Dr. Ward said that race talk in America is such a complicated mess; it is like a chess game-one false move and then it's over.

Vice Mayor Davis stated that she still suggests monitoring the explicit recommendations in the report as a good next step.

Councillor Simmons said that the committee could agree that the recommendation in the report should be monitored and that there are areas for which sufficient recommendations were not included in the report, specifically, race and class.

Professor Haslanger described her experience in designing and conducting workshops at MIT about race and gender. They tried to figure out what scientists could hear, and that brought them to the realization of how important it was to start in their language.

Councillor Simmons said that race and class were not adequately addressed in this report and now we have to bring the issue back. Cambridge gets caught up on avoiding this discussion. Diversity in the room does not guarantee that the conversation will happen.

Dr. Disch described the experience in New Bedford. In response to a troubling increase in arrests of youth New Bedford instituted a program to focus on youth/police relationships. When the police took black kids into police cars for a ride along and the police got to know the kids as people, the arrest rates went down.

Dr. Ward said that it is helpful for individuals to locate themselves in systems. Here, the police decided to interpret the problem within their framework and race and class were outside of the box. She added that she wonders whether there are other systems in Cambridge that are operating similarly. The first thing that comes to her mind is the Cambridge Public Schools.

There ensued a discussion about race and class in the public schools including the effects of micro aggression. Thereafter Councillor Simmons moved the discussion to the issue of next steps with regard to the committee's work on analyzing the Cambridge Review Committee Final Report.

It was agreed that Commissioner Haas and Deputy Superintendent Christine Elow would be invited to the next meeting for further discussion and an update on the police training that they described at an earlier Civic Unity Committee meeting.

Councillor Simmons stated that she would like the committee to take a closer look at the report's recommendations for the Police Department to have a community liaison and/or a contact person for situations which result in elevated levels of public concern, particularly when race/class intersects in the situation.

It was also agreed that engaging in any sort of "blame game" with respect to race and class and why the issue was not dealt with sufficiently in the report would not be productive and that the committee should consider whether and how it wants to continue to address race and class, for example, whether it should continue to focus on the Crowley/Gates incident and report, or on a more general look at race and class in context of the police/criminal justice system, a comparison of race and class in different systems, for example, the police and public education, or examination of recent academic work such as the Binaji experiments.

Councillor Simmons thanked all those present for their attendance and participation. The meeting adjourned at eight o'clock and thirty-five minutes P.M.

For the Committee,
Councillor E. Denise Simmons, Chair


Committee Report #3
The University Relations Committee held a public meeting on Sept 28, 2010 beginning at 4:02pm in the Sullivan Chamber. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss campus safety in Cambridge.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Leland Cheung; Vice Mayor Henrietta Davis; and D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk. Also present were Police Commissioner Robert Haas; Police Lieutenant Daniel Wagner; Dan Riviello, Communications Specialist, Cambridge Police Department; Larry Carr, Director of Campus Services, Lesley University; Nicole O'Leary, Captain of Public Safety, Lesley University; Michael Pierce, Director of Business Relations Cambridge College; John DiFava, Chief of M I T Police; Jay Perault, Captain, MIT Police; Sarah Gallop and Paul Paravanno, co-directors, Office of Government and Community Relations, MIT; Michael Pierce, Deputy Director of Harvard University Police Department; Tom Lucey, Community and Government Relations Office, Harvard University; Stephen Cataldo, special assistant to chief, Harvard University Police Department; Michael Giacoppo, Harvard University Police; and Brian Spatocco, MIT Graduate Student Council.

Councillor Cheung convened the meeting and explained the purpose. Councillor Cheung stated that after hearing that the Daily Beast MIT campus newspaper released the findings of a report that analyzes crime reports of the last two years of almost 9000 schools and found that Harvard ranked 20th and MIT ranked third in crime rankings, he submitted a city Council order requesting that the City Manager review the report and forward the results of his review to the City Council. He added that as a student he did not have the feeling that these campuses were very dangerous.

Councillor Cheung then invited Lieutenant Dan Wagner of the CPD to address the Daily Beast reports. Lieutenant Wagner submitted a report from police Commissioner Hass (Attachment A)for the record. He stated that they had reviewed the Daily Beast report. He stated that the reports utilized flawed methodology. The study combines standards from both the FBI and the Department of Education and used two different methodologies from two different agencies over two years to form its conclusion. The geographic areas evaluated beyond campus boundaries are also not clear and are subject to vast differences. In addition, as the report itself acknowledged, college crime reporting is neither accurate nor consistent. Depending on how institutions classify certain types of crime, for example burglary versus larceny, they may have been counted differently by different universities, weighted differently, or in the case of larcenies, not counted at all. Lieutenant Wagner noted that the data used for the analysis was for the years 2007 and 2008 which saw an uptick in crime in Cambridge. Crime is currently at record lows.

Lieutenant Wagner emphasized that the City of Cambridge and the Cambridge Police Department both have very strong relationships with MIT and Harvard police departments. The CPD is beginning to provide regular in-service training to Harvard University police and MIT police in a combined setting with Cambridge police officers. The CPD is working with universities to incorporate CPD crime prevention and safety tips geared toward students in the welcome/orientation material they receive (Attachment B). Members of the Cambridge police community relations unit met with students at the orientation days in the at the beginning of the fall semester to pass out informational packets containing information on how to report crimes how to keep their belongings safe, and how to sign up for our citizen alert program (Attachment B).

Councillor Cheung asked whether there are differences in the way the colleges are reporting crimes that are affecting the numbers. Lieutenant Wagner reported in the affirmative.

At this time Councillor Cheung then invited Harvard to speak on these issues. Michael Prince, Harvard Police Deputy Chief, stated that he is very new to this position and he is here to listen. Mr. Lucy said that members of the Harvard Administration believe that Cambridge is a safe city and Harvard is a safe campus. They take security very seriously. When you look at the Daily Beast report you have to keep in mind that there are different methodologies used by the universities in their reporting. Harvard's report on the Longwood area always keeps a lot of the surrounding area crime in its statistics. A little more than one third of the included area is beyond the actual campus. There is different reporting to the Department of Education and the FBI. For example, burglary gets reported to the Department of Education and larceny does not. Harvard takes a very conservative approach so food theft from a shared refrigerator is reported as burglary. He added that new guidelines from the Department of Education will lower the number of burglaries reported. Mr. Lucy added that Harvard has a great working relationship with the Cambridge Police Department.

Councillor Cheung noted that the Daily Beast acknowledged that Harvard is particularly good at getting students to report date and acquaintance rape. He asked how Harvard fosters an atmosphere that encourages this reporting. Mr. Lucy replied that Harvard maintains an Office of Sexual Violence and Response that does a lot of outreach. It is a major effort and time commitment but it appears to be working.

Captain Nicole O'Leary of the Lesley University Public Safety Department operated by Securitas spoke next. She stated that their office has a very good relationship with the Cambridge Police Department. Lesley University always takes the attitude that students need to be aware that this is an urban environment, but students feel very comfortable at Lesley. There is a small residential population and the public safety department meets with the residents at the beginning of the term, which fosters a good reporting atmosphere.

Chief John Di Fava, MIT police, stated that the Daily Beast article is more sensational than factual. As with Harvard's Longfellow Avenue campus, the question is how much of the surrounding area is included. Twenty-seven fraternities and sororities are located on the Boston side of the river. He does not know how much of the crime reported comes from the surrounding area in Boston. The MIT physics facility is located in Middletown right next to the Middlesex Jail, and he believes they end up with some of those statistics as well. A more accurate picture can be found in the clearing house statistics on campus crime.

Captain Perault, MIT police, stated that MIT does show a high number for larcenies, and justifiably so; most involve electronics which students leave around. Mr. Spatocco said that from his perspective, it really is burglary that keeps MIT ranking high in the crime statistics, so it is important to analyze where most of these thefts are occurring. He has had theft from his offices two times. He questioned why MIT keeps its buildings so accessible. Ms. Gallop said that MIT has a long-standing open-door tradition of which the Institute is very proud. It is seen as part of MIT's core identity. Chief DiFava said that does not mean that all of the labs and offices must remain open.

Councillor Cheung asked if the urban schools reporting less crime are safer or are underreporting. Stephen Cataldo, assistant to the chief of Harvard University police, stated that he does not know the answer to that question. He suspects that it relates to how different universities define "reasonably contiguous" to the campus area. He uses a broad area as being reasonably contiguous, but on the other hand, the Department of Education has told them in the area is not contiguous unless it is right next to the campus. Ms. Bedell said that New York University was on the list of high crime campuses when she was attending NYU and was involved in student government. There are a lot of ambiguities in the reporting. IYU student government's question then, as is the question now, is how to deal with being on the list.

Councillor Cheung invited the students present to speak. Mr. Chand, graduate student and member of the Harvard Graduate Council, said that on campus students do feel safe, but around the affiliate housing off campus, students do not feel safe, especially during late hours. Mr. Ebrahim, Harvard student, member of the Harvard Undergraduate Council, said that most undergraduates feel very comfortable with the Harvard University Police Department and have a positive relationship with that department. Aside from a recent scare there have not been many big issues. Most worrying to the undergraduates is the recent rape/sexual assault.

Brian Spatocco, MIT Graduate Student Council, stated that the statistics show a one-dimensional crime - robbery. Students do not feel secure with regard to theft. Seventy percent of graduate students live off campus, so off-campus crime is very relevant to them. He urged more attention to the methodology used to gather the statistics.

Councillor Cheung said that burglary and theft to add to the feeling of not being safe. He asked Harvard representatives about the affiliate housing concern expressed by the students. Mr. Pierce said that students who need an escort to get home late at night can call for an escort. Most of those calls come from Peabody Terrace and other Mount Auburn Street housing.

At this time Councillor Cheung asked Commissioner Haas to talk about CPD collaboration with the police and security departments of the universities located in Cambridge. Commissioner Haas said that CPD's relationship with each institution is different. For Lesley University, CPD provides the primary police service. Harvard and MIT have their own police departments. For every large event at the universities, CPD works together with the university police department. They share common radio channels. They have offered in-service training to both MIT and Harvard police departments for 32 years. Crime rates have steadily decreased. Most of the crime is street robbery involving iPods and cell phones.

Lieutenant Wagner said that CPD and the university police departments share crime data daily and communicate at least weekly on current issues. There is very close collaboration with regard to the investigation of crimes and sharing crime data.

Councillor Cheung asked about issues with Peabody Terrace and Mount Auburn Street. Vice Mayor Davis said that she too had heard reports of problems there years ago when she was at the Kennedy School. Lieutenant Wagner responded that there is no ongoing recent robbery pattern for that area. Last year there were 172 robberies citywide. He will look at the statistics on where the robberies are occurring in the city. Vice Mayor Davis noted that the area around Peabody Terrace and Mount Auburn Street is more susceptible to incursions from Memorial Drive. Lieutenant Wagner said that a person walking by him or herself late at night, wearing an iPod, not aware of the surroundings in a place without many other people presents a target of opportunity. There are 4-5 violent crimes a year in the Banks Street, Memorial Drive, Peabody area.

Chief DiFava said that there is a similar issue with respect to the perception of the dangerousness of Sydney Street, a perception that is not supported by the crime statistics. To law enforcement, perception is reality. Vice Mayor Davis said that she remembers having heard something similar while she was attending the Kennedy school. It is important to look at the area over time and with aggregation. Maybe there are physical changes that could be made. She noted that Erie Street in the mid-block area is very isolated.

There was discussion of a new program called bridge stat which provides a new tool for analyzing crime statistics quickly in many different ways, including place-centered ways. Commissioner Haas said that today most of the uses of police resources and deployments are driven by where they anticipate the crimes are going to be. Councillor Cheung agreed that it is important to use a method or reporting that analyzes the information and doesn't just report incident after incident.+

Mr. Chand asked whether students can get information when the perpetrator of a nearby crime is apprehended. Mr. Lucey said that information is available from the Harvard University police. Commissioner Haas added that the information can also be obtained from the CPD, including via Twitter and Facebook.

Councillor Cheung thanked all those present for their participation in this very informative meeting. The meeting was adjourned at 6:08pm.

For the University Relations Committee,
Councillor Leland Cheung, Chair


Committee Report #4
The Housing Committee held a public meeting on Tues, May 24, 2011 beginning at nine o'clock and thirty minutes A.M in the Ackermann Room. The meeting was held for the purpose of receiving information about the availability of and need for single room occupancy (SRO) units in Cambridge and about any other affordable housing suitable for seniors and others in need of SRO housing.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Marjorie C. Decker, Chair of the Committee; Vice Mayor Henrietta Davis; and D. Margaret Drury, City Clerk. Also present were Michelle Carter; Laurelyn Peru; Eva Martin Blythe, Executive Director, Cambridge YWCA; Heather O'Leary, Cambridge YWCA; Trudy Bartlett, Cambridge YWCA; Cassie Arnaud, Housing Planner, Community Development (CDD); Chris Cotter, Housing Director, CDD; Michael Haran, CEO, CASCAP, and member of the Affordable Housing Trust (AHT); Peter Graham, Housing Director, Just-A-Start (JAS); Pam Edwards, Organizer, Mass Senior Action Council, (MSAC); Ruby Woodbine, MSAC; Grendel Ellis, MSAC; Helen Spann, 50 Churchill Avenue, MSCA; Rosemarie Soucey, 950 Erie Street, MSAC; Joan Morris, 2050 Massachusetts Avenue, MSAC; Isabel Teller, 2 Mt. Auburn #608, Cambridge; Hasson Rashed, Cambridge; Al King; Robert Jones, 150 Erie Street; Annie Santulan, MSAC; Charlene Reese, Cambridge; Nancy Messon, 166 Hampshire Street, Mass Senior Action, Somerville-Cambridge Elder Services; Cristina Martinez, MSAC, 20 Ware St. #24; Robert Thames, 264 Mt. Auburn Street #804; Richard C. Wadman, MSAC, 2 Mt. Auburn Street #804; Jim Munafo, Cambridge; Joseph Capared, MSAC; Jack Welch, 164 Auburn Street Apt. 2; Cecilia Burks, MSAC; Victoria Harris; Elaine DeRosa, Executive Director, CEOC; and Peter Daly, Executive Director of Homeowner's Rehab, Inc. and member of the Affordable Housing Trust (AHT).

Councillor Decker convened the meeting and explained the purpose. She began the meeting with public testimony. She invited representatives from affordable housing agencies and advocates, as well as SRO tenants and those in need of SRO units to speak.

Eva Martin Blythe, Executive Director, Cambridge YWCA, stated that the Cambridge YWCA operates single room occupancy (SRO housing) and has done so since 1911. She provided statistics and demographics regarding the occupants of the 108 rooms. Ms. Blythe said SROs can foster community building that is not typically seen in other types of residential housing. She submitted a copy of her remarks (Attachment A).

Jack Welch, 164 Auburn St., Apt. 2, spoke about his desire for more information on this topic.

Laurelyn Peru, 240 Albany St., stated that she has been homeless for thirteen (13) years, including ten (10) years at the Albany Street Shelter on and off, and has worked the entire time. She now receives disability of $720 per month and it is not possible for her to put together a first and last month's security deposit. She has a thirteen year old daughter.

Michelle Carter stated that she is homeless. She became homeless a year ago due to illness. She recently married a man who has lived in Cambridge all his life. They went to Cambridge Housing Authority (CHA) and did not get help. You can only stay at the Albany Street Shelter if you can prove you had been a Cambridge resident before you became homeless. There have to be some places for homeless married people who do not have kids.

Cheryl Thomas stated that she is homeless and has been homeless for over two (2) years. She has three kids, including a 19 year old and an 11 year old. She is very tired of having to find a place for the night every day.

Pam Edwards, Organizer, Mass Senior Action Council, stated that they met with Mayor Maher in December. They had heard stories like those being told today and started doing outreach on single room occupancies and why they have disappeared.

Helen Spann, MSAC, 50 Churchill Avenue, stated that she has worked all of her life. She was a registered nurse. In 2004 she had two cancers in a year. Her doctors will not allow her to work. The CHA refuses to meet with her regarding notices of increases in rent that she has received. She has had the Mayor, his secretary, and the tenant council all working on this without success.

Nancy Messon, MSAC, 166 Hampshire Street, stated that a number of her senior friends have lived as homeless people for years, not in shelters, but on the street, living here and there, sleeping in basements. They are all over sixty (60), some working; almost all are not substance abusers.

Hassan Rashed, SRO tenant at the YMCA, stated that he is a board member of ACT and that he has two community CCTV programs a week. Cambridge is pretty good about taking people of the streets into SRO's. But Cambridge is not good at the next step with regard to the rights of SRO occupants to participate in local government or any organization that offers services to SRO units. He would like more information about the rights of SRO tenants.

Mary Chin, 46 Pleasant Street, spoke in support of more housing resources for homeless women. Many are the victims of past domestic trauma.

Councillor Decker thanked all of those who offered testimony for sharing their stories. She introduced Peter Daly, Executive Director of Homeowner's Rehab, Inc and member the AHT, and Michael Haran, CEO of CASCAP and member of the AHT. The trust was established twenty (20) years ago to help fund affordable housing. Councillor Decker also introduced Christopher Cotter, Housing Director, CDD, Elaine DeRosa, Executive Director of CEOC, and Vice Mayor Henrietta Davis who stated that she is chairing the Silver Ribbon Commission. Vice Mayor Davis said that commission heard from the Mass Senior Action Committee, a few weeks ago. The commission has a long term focus.

Councillor Decker invited Mr. Cotter to begin. He stated that the need is great. The commitment is and should continue to be there to fund SRO's. CDD Housing Department works with the AHT to identify needs. Federal funding for affordable housing is being cut, twenty percent (20%), from one source of funds and fifteen percent (15%) from the other. The Community Preservation Act (CPA) match funds that the City receives from the state have been reduced by sixty percent (60%). CDD staff has been working with the YWCA on a planned 108-room SRO and with the YMCA on a 128 unit project. They hope to see both projects move to closing and construction during FY12. He said that in addition they are trying to add to the stock of affordable family units. Mr. Cotter said that a year ago, in cooperation with CASCAP, sixteen (16) SRO units in North Cambridge were preserved. CASCAP manages SROs. Mr. Cotter said that they also completed fourteen (14) units of SRO housing in conjunction with Heading Home a couple of years ago.

Councillor Decker said that she knows anecdotally that there has been a big decrease in SROs. She asked about the average waiting time for a SRO unit.

Mr. Haran said that in 1979, excluding group homes and the YWCA and YMCA, there were 502 SROs in Cambridge, including some of the private rooming houses that were prevalent earlier in the century. By 1999 there were only 171 units left. On three streets, Inman, Bigelow and Clinton, there were 206 SROs in 1979; by 1999, only thirty (30) remained. Mr. Haran stated that one of the issues for new construction of SROs is that the unit cost is very high and when the AHT has to go to the state or federal government for funding, the cost is way over what those funding sources are willing to pay.

Mr. Daly said that he believes the majority of SROs were lost in the four years after the loss of rent control. He said that they are trying to preserve what we have and to get units into the affordable housing stream. Whenever a lodging house comes on the market they take a close look to see if they can make the finances work to save it. They also have a loan program to help owners preserve current SROs.

Councillor Decker then described the Inclusionary Zoning and Incentive Zoning. The Inclusionary Zoning mechanism has been a good way to add affordable housing to the City, but owners are required to make the affordable units in the building identical to the other units, and market rate developers do not typically build SRO units.

Mr. Daly emphasized the importance of knowing what they are looking for. For example, very few SROs have elevators. Another factor is the income level of the target population and whether the occupants will have low or moderate incomes. If the occupants have a moderate income level, the affordable housing agencies may be able to do reconstruction without subsidies, but if the occupants will be people with low incomes, subsidies will be needed. Mr. Cotter said that smaller buildings are usually the most appropriate for SRO use. Mr. Haran said that these buildings usually require zoning relief, and that there is a need for neighborhood and public support.

Mr. Haran gave the example of a lodging house on Clinton Street that was listed for sale about twenty years ago. The CHA was going to buy it, but there was a great deal of neighborhood opposition. Neighbors asked for time to talk with the CHA and bought it out from under the CHA. The same thing happened on Bigelow Street.

Mr. Graham, JAS, stated that he did not know whether there is a recent survey and data set regarding current occupants of SROs and what they need. When someone has been living in her or his home, moving them can be a destabilizing destruction to their lives, but managers of affordable housing are continuously faced with the challenge of over- and under-housed tenants.

Mr. Rashed, Alliance for Cambridge tenants asked how the AHT has complied with the mandates of Federal and State regulations for tenant participation. Mr. Cotter noted that the process for allocating Community Preservation Act funds requires a public hearing which will be held on June 21, 2011 in the Sullivan Chamber. This is an important opportunity for people to have input into what kind of housing the City should support. He added that all of the AHT meetings are open meetings. In addition, the CHA is in the process of holding meetings on what their capital reconstruction plans are.

Vice Mayor Davis said that there are ongoing group meetings at the Senior Center about shared living opportunities. Eileen Ginnetty, Director of the Council on Aging, is the contact person.

Vice Mayor Davis asked what has worked, what has been the most successful model for producing SROs and what formula makes it work.

Mr. Haran provided the example of Harvey Street, which was a fully occupied SRO purchased by CASCAP. The Harvey Street SRO had been a well run lodging house, and the neighbors did not oppose its continuation. CASCAP asked the tenants what would make their housing better and used tenants' responses in their rehab plan. Neighbors were very concerned about CASCAP's purchase. On the other hand, CASCAP purchased a lodging house on Bigelow Street which was overcrowded and not kept up. Once they met with the neighbors and explained to the neighbors what their plans were for rehabilitation of the building, they were very accepting.

Mr. Cotter said in other places SROs have involved partnerships utilizing both state and federal funds. Mr. Haran said that almost all the existing SROs are filled by tenants with Section 8 vouchers. Back in the 1970s, almost none were.

Mr. Cotter said that when the Section 8 vouchers are project based, people do not need to already have a Section 8 voucher to apply to live there.

Elaine DeRosa, Executive Director of CEOC, said, with regard to what is successful, it is critical that people in need of housing come to the CPA meetings. There will be people there who say Cambridge does not need affordable housing and does not need more homeless people housed here.

Councillor Decker emphasized the need for tenants to organize and to become aware of the advocacy opportunities. She suggested that Mass Senior Action come to the Affordable Housing Trust meetings. She also encouraged a link between CEOC and Mass Senior Action and suggested that they come to the City Council meeting when the report of the committee meeting comes to full City Council. The importance of and need for affordable housing is not always the highest priority for all City Councillors.

Lisa Schulman, Women's Center, Pleasant Street, asked if there was any effort to purchase properties that have been taken by foreclosure. Mr. Cotter said that they do monitor foreclosures but there are not a lot in Cambridge.

Mr. Welch stated that he misunderstood the purpose of the meeting and suggested advocates do an inventory. He said that senior citizens vote and should use that power. He noted that as seniors get older certain kinds of SROs do not work for them.

Sherry Tucker, 854 Massachusetts Avenue, asked if it would cost less to build SROs than apartments with kitchen and bathrooms. Mr. Cotter replied that it depends on the building. Acquisition costs are always high.

Councillor Decker stated that the CHA staff was unable to attend. They have submitted information about CHA resources (Attachment B) and expressed strong interest in future discussion of this topic.

Councillor Decker thanked all those present for their attendance. The meeting was adjourned at eleven o'clock and twenty minutes a.m.

For the Committee,
Councillor Marjorie C. Decker, Chair


Committee Report #5
The Ordinance Committee held a public hearing on July 18, 2011 beginning at 4:35pm in the Sullivan Chamber for the purpose of considering a proposed amendment to the Zoning Ordinance to enable the City's regional bike-share program to site bike-share stations on municipal and private property (Attachment A).

Present at the meeting were Councillor Sam Seidel, Chair of the Committee; Mayor David Maher; Councillor Leland Cheung; Cara Seiderman, Transportation Program Manager, Community Development Department (CDD); Jeff Roberts, Neighborhood Planner, CDD; Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager for Community Development; Susan Glaser, Deputy Director, CDD; Susanne Rasmussen, Director of Environmental and Transportation Planning, CDD; Margaret Drury, City Clerk; and Paula Crane, Administrative Assistant, City Clerk's Office.

Councillor Seidel opened the meeting by stating that he believes that the bike-sharing program will be good for the community, environment and health. He stated that it is an impetus to get people out of their cars and into another mode of transportation. He invited the Community Development Department to present the proposed amendment.

Ms. Seiderman and Mr. Roberts then gave a presentation regarding bike-sharing. (Attachment B). Ms. Seiderman stated that bike- sharing involves a pool of many bicycles shared and used for short trips, usually one-way. At the end of the trip the bicycle is dropped off at another bike sharing station. These stations are modular, movable systems which are solar-powered and wireless. The bike docks can be assembled in a variety of different sizes to accommodate different numbers of bikes. She stated that some of the benefits of bike-sharing are climate change goals, the replacement of car trips, public health goals and the support and extension of the value of public transportation.

Ms. Seiderman informed the committee that there are approximately 240 public bike share systems in the world. They are primarily in Europe and there are dozens of systems in North America such as Montreal, Washington, D.C. and Minnesota. She explained the components of the system and gave some examples of bike sharing such as the Capital Bike Share Program in Washington, D.C. She stated that the Minneapolis system is used by the university and has been in place for two years. They have interesting data regarding how their system has been used. She explained that the subscribers have reported an increase in biking among all groups. Another interesting point is that when asked, people stated that if they had not used the bike-share, they would have used their car. Their survey showed that 90% of the time, the bike-sharing was used for work, errands, etc., and was only used for recreational purposes 10% of the time.

Ms. Seiderman stated that the Hubway program will be launching in Boston next week. The bike-share launch in Cambridge is slated for the fall of 2011 with fourteen stations. The full launch would likely be in the spring of 2012. She stated that a zoning ordinance amendment is necessary because this new use is not covered in the current zoning. There is limited public space in Cambridge and there are many more opportunities on private property. Harvard and MIT are eager to participate in the program. The zoning proposal would permit public system bike-share only, much like public transportation. If the bike-share station is on private property, it is still useable by all.

Mr. Roberts then described the mechanics of the proposed zoning amendment. He stated that the stations that would be located on private property would need to adhere to the zoning. The proposed zoning language (Attachment B) has six main points:
1. Define new use.
2. Exemption from Gross Floor Area
3. Make an allowed use in all districts
4. Specify that Bike-Share Stations won't obstruct yard setbacks
5. Exempt from bicycle parking design requirements
6. Exempt public Bike-Sharing stations from sign regulations.

Councillor Seidel asked about the strategy of the roll out of the program. Ms. Seiderman stated that the City has enough money for fourteen stations. These stations would be primarily located from the Harvard Square area heading east for the rollout. Once they are working and functional, the next tier of locations will be identified. She stated that gaps will be filled-in when determining desirable destination points. She commented that surveys of users will be used and more information will be obtained and made available. Ms. Seiderman submitted copies of letters from the Pedestrian Committee (Attachment C) and the Bicycle Committee (Attachment D) in support of the bike share program and amendment.

Councillor Seidel questioned the setback exemption status. Mr. Roberts stated that he believes the purpose of the system is to serve the general public but he believes that the system needs to be as close to the public way as possible and that in most districts they would be in the setback. Councillor Seidel stated that different locations will warrant different sizes of bike share systems. Mr. Roberts responded that the approach is to make the definition very narrow so it will apply only to the bike system that the City of Cambridge is administering.

Councillor Seidel then opened the meeting to public comment.

Charles Marquardt, 10 Rogers Street, stated that he is very pleased with the program. He believes there needs to be enhanced education between bikes and cars. He stated that the signage should be subdued. He also questioned the maintenance of the bike-sharing stations, for example, clearing of snow, etc. He stated that he is pleased with the schedule but questions the timing and how the City will meet the goals. He submitted an article from the Boston Globe (Attachment E) relative to bike station placement issues.

James Williamson, 1000 Jackson Place, stated his concern for the current state of bicycle riding in the city. He stated that the current situation needs to be under control before we launch into new programs. He relayed recent experiences he has had with aggressive bikers. He stated that he feels that a hold should be put on this program until the sidewalks are safe for pedestrians. He submitted two articles from the Boston Globe (Attachment F) about the safety threat of irresponsible cyclists.

Steve Miller, 92 Henry Street, stated that studies show that this service impacts the least active cyclists by increasing their openness to the benefits of using bicycles and other alternatives to cars for transportation. He stated that bike-sharing will have an impact on congestion. People will become more active participants in public transit. He said that he also believes this program will change bike culture on the streets. He commented that bicycling needs to be a mainstream and safe activity. He believes that the location of the bike stations is an important piece of the program. He would like to start building city-wide networks for bicyclists. He stated that another important piece of the program is signage. Visitors to the City need to feel safe and know where they are going, how far their destination is, etc.

Terence Smith, Manassas Avenue, stated that he is the director of government relations for the Cambridge Chamber of Commerce, but that he is speaking on his own behalf, not in his role with the Chamber of Commerce. He spoke in support of the bike sharing program and zoning amendment and stated that the greatest rise in vehicle traffic is trips that take place during the day.

Margaret McMahon, 14 Highland Avenue, said that she is in favor of bike-sharing but emphasized that there need to be rules for bicyclists. She stated that safety is a priority and she would like to see some restrictions for bicycles.

John Wilhelm, Director of Transportation Services, Harvard University, stated that he has worked closely with the City and safety is a concern for Harvard. Helmets are extremely important and he believes that Cambridge has done well in this regard. He stated that bike sharing creates an atmosphere where bicycles and cars co-exist peacefully.

Stephen Kaiser, Hamilton Street, stated that he has been riding his bicycle for the past forty years. He would like to introduce an additional element of safety. He stated that it is difficult for bicyclists to see what is happening behind them. He commented that he built a rearview mirror for his bicycle and feels that it is important part of the safety element. He realizes that he is in the minority about wanting a mirror on his bicycle but believes having a safe view is very important.

Timothy Rowe, CEO, Cambridge Innovation Center, submitted a letter of support of bicycle sharing and the proposed amendment (Attachment G).

Councillor Cheung stated that it is important to have the bike-share program and he is very excited to see the program roll out. He stated that community awareness is imperative. He stated that this will help to bring more bicyclists. He thanked all the people who have been instrumental in getting this program up and running.

Mayor Maher moved to refer the matter to the full City Council with a favorable recommendation. The matter was referred on a voice vote without objection.

Councillor Seidel thanked the Community Development Department for their hard work and thanked those present for their participation.

The meeting was adjourned at 5:25pm.

For the Committee,
Councillor Sam Seidel, Chair


Committee Report #6
The Public Safety Committee conducted a public meeting on Tues, May 10, 2011 at 6:10pm in the Sullivan Chamber.

The purpose of the meeting was to receive an update on marijuana use and whether a Municipal Code amendment to prohibit smoking marijuana in public places is needed and plans for maintaining and enhancing public safety during the upcoming summer months.

Present at the meeting were Councillor E. Denise Simmons, Chair of the Committee; Councillor Craig Kelley; Councillor Leland Cheung; Councillor Kenneth Reeves; Deputy City Manager Richard Rossi; Police Commissioner Robert Haas; Deputy Superintendent Paul Ames; Officers Steve Demarco and Dan Wagner, Cambridge Police Officers; Kimley Joseph; and Donna P. Lopez, Deputy City Clerk.

Also present were Whitney Taylor, Field Director, ACLU Massachusetts, 211 Congress Street, Boston; Shaleen Tithe, LEAP, 121 Mystic Avenue, Medford, MA; John Amusilp, Law Enforcement Unit, LEAP; Karen Hawkes 10B Morphin Lane, Rowley, MA; and Beth Noll, 41 Wallingford Road, Boston, MA.

Councillor Simmons opened the meeting and stated the purpose. This meeting came about from a City Council order adopted on Aug 2, 2010 which asked the Police Department to report back to the City Council on the impact on the Police Department of decriminalizing marijuana possession. A report was received from the Police Commissioner dated Sept 10, 2010. The report was transmitted to the City Council on Sept 13, 2010. Said report contained two proposed Municipal Code amendments. One proposed amendment would prohibit smoking marijuana in public places (ATTACHMENT A) and the second would impose a non-criminal offense of $200 for refusal to give a police officer their true name and address (ATTACHMENT B). This report was referred to the Public Safety Committee with the request that the Public Safety Committee report back to the City Council on whether to adopt the proposed ordinances. A Public Safety meeting was held on Nov 8, 2010 and conversation led to more questions. It was realized that the proposed ordinance came from the DA office and other cities and towns have adopted this ordinance. Members present at the November meeting were not sure that they were ready to adopt these ordinances. This meeting is another meeting to discuss further the proposed ordinances. The outcome of this meeting is whether the City of Cambridge should adopt these amendments to the Municipal Code.

Councillor Kelley stated that he would like to see wording that states you cannot smoke marijuana. He favored it not be decriminalized. He spoke about enforcement.

Councillor Simmons distributed a list of cities and towns who have adopted ordinances or by-laws prohibiting the public use and possession of marijuana and the language of said ordinances. These cities and towns include Methuen, Winthrop, Duxbury, Springfield, Malden, Marlborough and Milford (ATTACHMENT C). She asked if more or stricter enforcement is needed.

Commissioner Haas stated that there is a need to make the civil offense a more enforceable citation. Councillor Simmons asked if the proposed Municipal Code amendment would give the police better enforcement ability. Commissioner Haas stated that one proposal would regulate where marijuana could be smoked. This is a public health issue. His department has received complaints from residents of Washington Elms and Newtowne Court about the smell of marijuana in the hallways.

Councillor Kelley asked how it can be acceptable to do something that is illegal. Councillor Simmons stated that she believes more education is necessary, especially at the high school. Young people believe that marijuana use is now decriminalized therefore it is legal. She asked would marijuana use be covered if there was a ban on no smoking in public places. Commissioner Haas encouraged the City Council to include marijuana in the no smoking in public places ordinance. The current ordinance only includes tobacco. Councillor Kelley commented marijuana is illegal; tobacco is legal. Why are additional measures needed?

John Amusilp inquired how many people have refused to identify themselves when using marijuana. Commissioner Haas stated that he asks people to stop using the marijuana; this is enforcement. If a citation is issued and not paid there is no consequence. There is no mechanism in place after a citation is issued and 21 days have passed to either pay or appeal the citation. There is no consequence.

Whitney Taylor stated that there is no new citation system for civil infraction. She stated that if a citation is issued and unpaid there can be an arrest. There is a mechanism in the current system. As to the false identify proposal she stated that under home rule you cannot create a local ordinance. Under Article 89 of the Constitution it is unconstitutional to create an additional fine. Possession and smoking is illegal; to add an additional fine would be problematic. Offenders will be forced into a criminal situation because they will be unable to pay the original and additional fines. The second proposed ordinance is problematic.

Deputy Superintendent Ames commented that smoking impacts families in parks. The police get complaints about the smoking. The marijuana ordinance is toothless because offenders are failing to identify themselves. The police can make arrests for consumption of alcohol in parks, but not for smoking marijuana in parks.

Councillor Cheung stated that the false identification ordinance was not constitutional. He was informed that the proposal was drafted by the Attorney General to roll back Question # 2. Ms. Whitney stated that Question #2 was voted in by the voters. However, proposal one is an additional citation. Why do you think that the second citation would have more teeth?

Commissioner Haas commented so the police keep issuing citations day after day. Proposal one is saying that the activity is not allowed in Cambridge in certain places. If a fine is imposed by the police it is for less than an ounce of marijuana, but if smoked it is doubly illegal. Smoking marijuana has impact on other people.

Councillor Cheung stated that he liked the education idea and would rather see data on this matter. He feels he is not informed enough to make a decision.

Councillor Kelley commented that he supported giving the police the authority to issue another fine for smoking in public places making it not right to smoke in public places and impact other people; not just that it is illegal. He wanted the police to have the tools they need to enforce: marijuana is not good to have or smoke. He does not want people going to jail.

Councillor Reeves stated that marijuana can be grown and sold for medicinal purpose in California. Councillor Reeves informed the committee that Proposition 19 in California failed to legalize marijuana. Depending on usage marijuana could be legal. Young people feel that marijuana sales are not a big deal. He stated that the entire criminal justice system in this country is broken. There should be a shift away from criminalizing things like marijuana use. Alcohol and cigarettes are not demonized. Commissioner Haas stated that there is increased violence relating to the sale of marijuana. Enforcement and education must go hand in hand.

Councillor Cheung stated that this is multiple issues. Possession of one ounce or less of marijuana is one issue. Smoking is a second issue. He would rather take the issues separately. He would like to see an emphasis on looking for solutions. He would like to see years of education and see proof that the education effort is not working then talk about further steps. Councillor Cheung wanted this to remain in committee.

Councillor Kelley stated that this is not about criminalizing anything; it does not involve arrest. He favored sending an important message that marijuana is not acceptable. The issue is the smoking, not the possession. Tobacco is a gateway drug. We should start there.

John Amusilp stated that he was opposed to tinkering with Question # 2 which was overwhelmingly passed by the voters. Eighty percent of Cambridge voters favored decriminalizing the possession of one ounce or less of marijuana. Question # 2 did not legalize marijuana use; it makes it a civil infraction. Criminal prohibition has been a failure. Marijuana is the most highly consumed illegal drug. In the last three years there have been 36,000 murdered in Mexico by the drug cartel. This is due to the criminal prohibition of marijuana. He stated that he has not heard anything about people not identifying themselves. The last three presidential candidates started their campaign with a drug disclaimer. This causes undermining the rule of law. There are now more people in prison for non violent drug crimes. What is done now is a failure and causes homicides each year. His organization is against drugs, alcohol and tobacco, but favors incremental change. No case has been made to give an additional fine or increase the current fine. People should respect the police. If told by a police officer to stop smoking marijuana and fail to do so then issue citation. Mr. Amusilp stated that the law is in place and it is not a good idea to tinker with it.

Beth Noll spoke about looking into ways to effectively deal with the nuisance of where people do not want to be bothered by smoke. Why change where you smoke, she asked? Commissioner Haas asked why smoking marijuana was left out of the smoking ordinance. Officer Demarco stated that smoking marijuana in public is offensive and illegal. He asked why the right of the person who is affected by smoke is not enforced. If an offender refuses to identify himself, why issue a citation? Education and enforcement are needed.

Whitney Taylor stated that possession and smoking is the same thing. Issue a citation. She stated that there is a problem with the refusing to identify oneself. The problem is with the municipal citation system. She suggested going to the state to work to fix the state system. There is a legality issue with Article 89 of the Constitution with the false identification proposal.

Councillor Simmons stated that the police wanted the false identification proposal if a citation for marijuana possession is issued. Why would this not be used for all laws? Commissioner Haas responded that there are laws that give the police the right to arrest when a person does not properly identify themselves. This is a tool to protect the public. There is a flaw in the law for people who do not identify themselves. Councillor Simmons stated that 89 cities and towns adopted something to deal with the impediment with Question # 2.

Councillor Simmons stated that the police are saying that the law to decriminalize marijuana has unintended consequences, such as increased use of marijuana, increased nuisance factor and increased violence. The police want the tools to reduce the violence. Mr. Amusilp stated that decriminalization is a half measure and it does have problems, but he is not hearing anything from the police to change the law.

Councillor Simmons stated that the City Council has options. They could do nothing or adopt the recommendations of the Police Department.

Councillor Kelley stated that riding a bike on the sidewalk, which is prohibited, is not the same thing as smoking marijuana. The drug laws do not work but that is not on the table. He did not see that it is a bad thing to give the police the tools needed. He favored the adoption of the false identification proposal.

Ms. Taylor reiterated again: the fine system is in place - use it! She suggested that there be two separate conversations for the two separate ordinance amendment proposals. She further stated that if the citation is not paid it is sent to court. This can escalate. The law is clear "possession for personal use" and "intent to distribute" is a different issue. Officer Demarco stated that officers use their discretion on intent to distribute when marijuana is under an ounce, but under an ounce does not mean you cannot be arrested. It is how the substance is packaged.

Councillor Simmons stated that the ordinance proposal increase the fines. Commissioner Haas stated that it is a nuisance factor when a citation is issued if legal information is not given to the officer. Marijuana consumption in certain public places is a problem, such as in a park or a housing development. Councillor Simmons asked if the ordinance banned cigarette smoking in public places would this be sufficient for marijuana. Commissioner Haas stated again that the ordinance language does not include marijuana. Councillor Simmons stated that the language could be added. She expressed concern with overregulation for persons of color and the poor. She did not want to increase the penalty for this population.

Councillor Kelley asked if one could be jailed for unpaid citations. Officer Demarco responded in the negative.

Karen Hawkes stated that there is a certain bias with marijuana. You do not want kids smoking marijuana. With an adult a marijuana citation is like a bike infraction. She spoke about prescription drugs that contain the same ingredients as in marijuana.

Councillor Simmons questioned if there is evidence that supports increased use of marijuana in public by young people. Commissioner Haas stated that there is an increased consumption of marijuana among students. Decriminalization means legal to kids. The education piece is important. Councillor Simmons stated that education needs to be used at the high school because of the increased smoking on campus.

Kimley Joseph asked once the fine is given is the person handcuffed? Officer Demarco stated that citation is issued at the scene or mailed to the home. Councillor Simmons commented that if the ordinance proposal is adopted it is only as effective as the individual's willingness to give the proper information. Commissioner Haas added that possession of marijuana is one violation; false information is a second violation. Deputy Superintendent Ames stated that when arrest is made the person accused of the crime needs to be identified. Councillor Simmons stated that this ordinance was offered to the police by the Attorney General. It was not a good idea. Ms. Taylor stated that there will be Constitutional challenges. Deputy Superintendent Ames stated that there is flaw in the current situation and he suggested this be remedy.

Beth Noll stated that the message sent should be done carefully. She cited the situation of a chemo patient ingesting marijuana in the park with their family. This type of situation should be considered.

At this time Councillor Kelley submitted the following motion:
ORDERED: That the following documents relating to the decriminalization of marijuana are forwarded to the Ordinance Committee for a hearing and report:
Public Safety Committee Reports for meetings held on Oct 20, 2010 and May 10, 2011.

The motion - Carried.

Councillor Simmons submitted the following motion:
ORDERED: That his Honor, the Mayor, be and hereby is requested to discuss with the School Committee the necessity to instituting a marijuana educational campaign at CRLA in an effort to reduce the consumption of marijuana by youth and young adults.

The motion - Carried.

Councillor Simmons now opened the discussion on plans for maintaining and enhancing public safety during the summer months.

Councillor Simmons asked Commissioner Haas what steps will be taken in the summer months. She is concerned with the safety issues in Area 4. Her biggest issue is the deployment of walking and bike patrols. She wanted 12 patrols in Area 4. A safety walk in Area 4 will be held on Saturday to ask residents to highlight issues and problem areas.

Commissioner Haas stated that officers are deployed where needed. Walking patrols will be maintained in Area 4 and North Cambridge and bike units are assigned by police staffing. More aggressive officers are on bike patrols and are more visible in Area 4, Central Square and North Cambridge. There was a shift of the homeless population to Harvard Square.

Officer Wagner stated that data is used extensively to deploy resources. The data shows emerging patterns or trends, information is provided on who are the offenders, traffic issues and community concerns. He meets bi-weekly with the command staff and review data and decides how resources are deployed.

Deputy Superintendent Ames stated that the increased data provided the police officers with information on who the offenders are and helps to predict where crime will occur.

Officer Wagner stated that the concern is the violence. The nexus of the violence is the distribution of marijuana. Young people are involved in these crimes. The illegal sale of marijuana is driving the violence.

Officer Wagner provided the following information:
160 drug distribution charges
9% were gun related
51% above the age of 23
56% had previous arrests
22% of marijuana arrests had a previous fire arm arrest
5 illegal guns were confiscated.

Councillor Simmons asked if a motorist is stopped at a light how do you know if they have a firearm. Officer Wagner responded by citing an example of when there is a vehicle offense an officer may smell marijuana. The search found marijuana and a gun.

Commissioner Haas stated that the door-to-door campaign continues with DHSP and the Housing Authority. Problems are found and resources are deployed. The police have a youth program. The Youth Academy for 14-16 has been expanded.

Councillor Simmons stated that she wanted to see the highest number of foot patrols in Area 4. She wanted officers deployed who know the residents. Commissioner Haas stated that due to collective bargaining officers must be assigned by seniority.

Councillor Kelley stated that he has received good feedback about the work done in North Cambridge around violent crimes. He suggested mapping crime and put this information in the budget. He asked if the hostage negotiation team is ever used. Deputy Superintendent Ames responded in the affirmative. Officer Wagner informed the committee that the mapping is included in the Bridge Stat Program that comes out monthly.

Councillor Kelley asked if underage drinking is addressed. Commissioner Haas stated that there is enforcement and involvement with drinking and smoking. The police do diversion and referral. There were 434 referrals made. The officers are trained as case workers and work with kids and their families. A child is brought home to their parents when a child is smoking. Follow-up is done. There has been a reduction in gangs and territorial issues.

Councillor Simmons thanked all those present for their attendance.

The meeting adjourned at 8:37pm.

For the Committee,
Councillor E. Denise Simmons, Chair


Committee Report #7
The Ordinance Committee held a public meeting on July 18, 2011 beginning at five o'clock and thirty four minutes P.M. in the Sullivan Chamber. The meeting was held for the purpose of continuing to consider proposed amendments to Section 5.28.2 Conversion of Nonresidential Structures to Residential Use and Section 4.29 clarifying the allowance of additional uses as permissible under Section 5.28.2.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Sam Seidel, Chair of the Committee; Mayor David P. Maher; Councillor Leland Cheung; and City Clerk D. Margaret Drury. Councillor Kelley submitted a letter which explained that he was unable to attend and included comments on the proposal (Attachment C). Also present were Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager for Community Development; Susan Glazer, Deputy Director, CDD; Stuart Dash, Director of Community and Neighborhood Planning, CDD; and Jeffrey Roberts, Neighborhood Planner, CDD.

Councillor Seidel convened the meeting and explained the purpose. He invited the CDD staff to provide an update on staff work since the last committee meeting on this petition. Susan Glazer began the presentation and submitted written material, a handout entitled "Determining the Number of Permitted Units Under Section 5.28.2" (Attachment B) and a document including language for the zoning ordinance amendment to incorporate the Planning Board recommendations and the most recent version of staff recommendations (Attachment A). Ms. Glazer stated that the most recent staff discussions and work focused on outstanding issues from the previous meeting. One issue that was a concern was the size of the units and whether the units could be so large that additional density and parking problems would result. CDD has tried to address that issue by limiting the amount of total gross floor area that can be used for living space within the individual units to 75%. The other 25% would have to be used for common space such as stairways, storage, laundry facilities, etc., or for parking located within the building or for nonresidential use as specified in 5.28.2, as amended. Ms. Glazer noted that this limitation would only apply to projects that consist of 20 units or more and are comprised of at least twice the density allowed by the base district zoning. Mr. Dash referred the committee to Attachment B for an example of the calculations that would result from this proposal.

Mayor Maher said that this has been a long process. It began when the Norris Street neighbors learned that the purchaser of the former North Cambridge Catholic High School intended to convert the building to residential units and that the current Section 5.28.2 could allow up to 53 units on the site. The City Council requested that CDD review the ordinance section and how it has worked and suggest changes. There have been six committee meetings and hearings on this issue. Mayor Maher said that he believes the current proposal is much better than the original Section 5.28.2. With regard to some of the criticism that he has heard calling this proposal an "upzoning" because of the allowance of limited amount of commercial use by special permit in the building, this provision was added to provide an additional tool to mitigate the potential increased density and resulting parking demand from the additional residential units. The mayor added that he intends to propose an amendment to reduce the amount of total GFA that can be used inside individual units to 70% instead of the currently proposed 75%.

Councillor Cheung agreed that the current proposal is a big improvement over the original Section 5.28.2. He asked why the staff did not include the neighbors' proposal of setting twice the GFA allowed in the base zoning as a cap on total GFA. Mr. Dash said that a developer who seeks to convert a building like a school, with significant gymnasium and auditorium space would be looking for more units that would be allowed by twice the GFA of the base district. So the developer would attempt to use the variance process to achieve additional GFA, and the variance law and process does not have the kind of criteria that can achieve the goals that the Zoning Ordinance established for Sec. 5.28.2 conversions.

Mr. Dash said that in looking back at the history of the development under Section 5.28.2, as the City Council requested staff to do, they found that it was the larger projects in neighborhoods that caused the most concern. Thus, there are several provisions in the proposal to provide additional consideration and criteria for projects of more than 10,000 square feet, and additional limitations on the calculation of the number of dwelling units for projects of 20 units or more and GFA of more than twice the allowed GFA in the base district.

Councillor Seidel then moved to public comment.

Dr. Rhizkhala, owner of 40 Norris, distributed a document in which he addressed the intent language in the proposed amendment (Attachment D). He read the intent language in the current version and stated that the only benefit identified by the Planning Board was clarification for developers and neighbors. He sees only one benefit, that of providing clarity. The majority of the proposed language is to clarify. While clarity is an admirable goal, and one that was sorely lacking, the unintended consequences of this proposal are so enormous that he is speechless. He will own this building for many years. It will affect his family for generations. He still prefers a straight cap of two times the FAR. He stated that he agrees that this is a much better piece of legislation than what we started with.

David Bass, 23 Norris Street, asked that there could be a value of nonprofit space within a building undergoing a 5.28.2 conversion. He suggested 65 percent of total GFA as the maximum square footage that could count in calculation of the number of units.

Susan Hall, 23 Norris Street, stated that there is a need to be careful about the language on page one. The average space has not gone from 1818 square feet to 1374 because the 1818 included the usual 15-20 percent of common area allocation while the 1374 does not include that. Unit size is actually reduced to approximately 1,663 square feet. Ms. Hall said that this is a laudable modest start. It is not enough of a change to encourage creative re-use of that space that cannot be included in the calculation of the number of units. She advocated for setting the percentage that could be used at 65 percent. The language is complicated. She suggested an alternative less complicated language such as "limiting GFA that can be . . ."

Young Kim, 17 Norris Street, submitted a letter (Attachment E) and provided testimony. He noted the possibility of using almost all of the 25 percent for commercial space, resulting in very little common space. He questioned whether the BZA has had an opportunity to review the parking changes. He urged all departments that could be involved to get together and review the proposed amendment line by line. Since most of the complicated scenarios end up with number and results that are very similar, he urges that the City Council "keep it simple."

Steve Kaiser, 191 Hamilton Street, said that he is generally in agreement with the comments in Councillor Kelley's letter. There is a clarity issue with respect to the words "upzoning" and "downzoning." He understood the developer's comments regarding the economic purpose as a question of where is his guaranteed profit. He urged the City Council to get a legal opinion on the constitutionality of such private profits.

Charles Teague, 23 Edmunds Street, stated that the big picture is that Section 5.28.2 is essentially pointless. Neighbors are smart enough to accept good development and reject bad ones. He said that as an old family description goes, the proposed changes are "ornaments on a dead tree." He added that the entire zoning ordinance needs work.

Charles Marquardt, 10 Rogers Street, stated that this proposal is complex, a lawyer's dream. Adding to the common space adds to the condo cost. What if the courthouse was a Sec. 5.28.2 project? There would be over 100,000 feet of common area. He also pointed to a seemingly arbitrary array of commercial uses that would be allowed and disallowed. Mr. Marquardt also suggested clarification of the affordable housing calculation.

Barbara Broussard, 148 Third Street, stated she finds the proposal confusing. The most over-developed neighborhood is Residence. C. What would happen if Section 5.28.2 were applied to the Harrington School?

Jean Fong, 53 Norris Street, said that the current zoning ordinance does not allow multi unit projects in Residence A and B districts. The amendment fails to address parking, filling up interim space, density of the project, privacy and nonresidential uses.

Heather Hoffman, 213 Hurley Street, stated that everyone should be part of the process. In ECAPS everyone was at the table. Here there are all of these private meetings. She said that she does not want to have another petition to revoke, like the sign ordinance. Just because this is a good solution for Norris Street, it does not mean it is good for all of Cambridge.

Councillor Cheung asked about Young Kim's comments regarding inconsistency in the way parking is addressed. Mr. Dash stated that he does not believe there is any inconsistency.

Councillor Cheung asked about Ms. Hall's suggestion to keep the maximum GFA at two times the GFA allowed in the base district. Mr. Dash said that there are a variety of projects around the City which are of very different sizes. A percentage makes more sense in dealing with this variety.

Councillor Cheung said he would prefer another Ordinance Committee meeting before the Aug 1st City Council meeting. Councillor Seidel said that he did not believe it possible to have another Ordinance Committee meeting, but he noted that there will be an opportunity for further discussion at the Aug 1st City Council meeting.

Mayer Maher asked CDD staff to expand the chart to cover Residential A, B and C districts.

Councillor Seidel thanked those present for their participation. The meeting was adjourned at seven o'clock and fifteen minutes.

For the Committee,
Councillor Sam Seidel, Chair


Committee Report #8
The Economic Development, Training and Employment Committee held a meeting on June 28, 2011, beginning at 3:08pm in the Sullivan Chamber for the purpose of discussing the creation of the city's economic development goals.

Present at the meeting were Councillor Leland Cheung, Chair of the Committee; Brian Murphy, Assistant City Manager, Community Development Department (CDD); Susan Glazer, CDD; Chris Basler, CDD; Pardis Saffari, CDD; Janneke House, Cambridge Local First; Terrence F. Smith, Chamber of Commerce; Walter Jenkins, MIT Investment Management Office; Patrick Verbeke, Valti LLC, 91 Sidney Street; Mr. Carlone, architect and urban designer, 16 Martin Street; and Charlie Marquardt, 10 Rogers Street.

Councillor Cheung welcomed those present and opened the meeting. He stated that the purpose of the meeting was to define economic development goals for the committee to recommend to the City Council for FY13. He distributed an agenda for the meeting (Attachment A), the City Council' economic development goals for FY09-10 and FY 11-12-13 (Attachments C&D) and the Community Development Department's economic development budget goals for FY12 (Attachment E) as background information. Councillor Cheung then distributed for discussion the suggested goals that he received as a result of a survey that his staff sent to the list of participants of previous meetings of the Economic Development Committee (Attachment B). The survey requested their suggestions as to what economic development goals the City should focus on. Councillor Cheung stated that he expected that the process of prioritizing goals should take two hearings, one to discuss the goals and one to finalize the goals for the FY13 budget.

A discussion of the suggested goals ensued. Regarding suggested goal #2 (emphasis on creating more neighborhood groups and fostering community outside the squares), Mr. Carlone spoke of the importance of meeting space for groups. Terrence Smith questioned what the City's involvement should be relative to neighborhood groups. He stated that he is a representative of a neighborhood group and he does not believe that it is the City's role to fund such organizations. He stated that the best thing the City can do is provide excellent services to people of Cambridge, which Cambridge does very well. He stated that there are two communities in Cambridge, neighborhood and business and the distinction between the two should not be lost.

Ms. Glazer stated that CDD's Economic Development Department (EDD) has supported the business community b y helping business associations promote businesses in their areas. The EDD does help neighborhood associations, though not financially, in terms of staff time, printing, technical assistance and the like. CDD also helps smaller neighborhood associations get off the ground and get moving.

Terrence Smith stated that the Chamber of Commerce supports those types of organizations as well. He commented that sometimes the requests from the organization are for funding and that skews the relationship. He stated that City staff should not become the responsible party. Mr. Smith commented that it is important that people become empowered. He stated that technical support is important but that it must be limited as neighborhoods are responsible for the ultimate support of the association.

Regarding suggested goals #3 (hardship for commercial landlords and tenants when the new tenants wants to use the space for a use not listed in the allowed uses for zoning district where the premises are located. Even a slight change of use could require a zoning variance which requires an application and hearing), # 7 (simplify zoning) and # 8 (accelerate zoning decisions), Councillor Cheung asked Charles Marquardt to speak on these issues. Mr. Marquardt stated that there is great need for the streamlining of the permitting/licensing processes. To go from a crepe restaurant to a waffle house requires a variance. It has taken him six months to get the necessary authorization to remove a wall inside his home. He recommended establishing the use table as a hierarchy of use. If I, II, and III are the overarching use categories and (a) (b) and (c) are more specific uses in the III category, then the ordinance could authorize City staff to sign off on changes of the subsidiary uses. This could accelerate what has become a 6-9 month process to a month. Councillor Cheung stated that this issue was previously labeled a priority. Mr. Marquardt stated that non-conforming status of so many buildings in Cambridge exacerbates the difficulty of making modifications and changes to the building's structure or use that could benefit the business.

Dennis Carlone spoke of a couple that is opening a business to sell nuts and candy on Massachusetts Avenue between Harvard and Porter Square. This is not a zoning change, but the process has taken six months. He stated that they are first-timers and they may need to be helped more than someone who has been through the process before. The permitting is the issue in this case, not zoning. Getting permits has proven to be difficult. He stated that some cities boast "one stop shopping."

Mr. Smith stated that it is a change of use issue, which is a zoning issue. He feels that the Zoning Table of Uses is where one most often runs into problems. He believes that this has to do with the complexity of the Zoning Ordinance and stated that almost half of the properties in City are non-conforming. The Zoning Ordinance issue has not been made easier. Councillor Cheung stated that he was hopeful for some kind of resolution of this problem in this Council term. He stated that there should be a more systematic review of zoning.

Mr. Murphy stated that the reason that a change of use requires a zoning variance is that a change of use will have an impact on the neighborhood. He said that it makes sense to go back and review the table of uses and the current process to see if tweaks to the current process could improve it. The streamlining issue makes sense. One ongoing project in the upcoming budget is putting more permits online through the Inspectional Services Department. He state that he believes that would be beneficial for all involved. He would be happy to take look at the process and what can be streamlined. CDD would like to find ways to reduce time for different processes.

Councillor Cheung asked that the Table of Uses be reviewed for ways to accelerate the decision process, especially for clear-cut issues.

Regarding suggested goal #4 (take advantage of unused warehouse space to lower the rent for start-ups so they can afford to stay in Cambridge instead of moving to Boston's Innovation District), Councillor Cheung asked whether there is any unused warehouse space in Cambridge. Mr. Carlone stated that there is some warehouse space in Neighborhood 9 and North Cambridge. Mr. Smith said that the Concord/Alewife rezoning encourages more mixed use and less industrial use. He does not believe that we have made it harder for pre-existing businesses to exist but it has become harder for companies to come into the City.

Mr. Jenkins stated that warehouses are built to hold "stuff" and when people move in there are not enough bathrooms, parking, etc. Warehouses are not located close to public transportation. He commented that start-ups want to be close to people and transportation. MIT has properties that they would like to do things with but do not lend themselves to needed uses. Warehouses are a wonderful concept but difficult to execute.

Councillor Cheung stated that he wants to ensure that there is a vacant space database listing potential sites for interested parties.

Ms. Saffari stated that she often suggests that people broaden their aspect as far as location when they are looking for space. She stated that she reminds people that Cambridge is only a six square mile city and maneuvering about within the City is not difficult.

Regarding suggested goal #19 (ensuring that the City actively promotes Cambridge as a place to grow business), Councillor Cheung stated that he would like to see a more solid base in which to grow a business.

Mr. Carlone questioned whether the Chamber of Commerce or the City sends welcome packages to new businesses. He believes that sends an important message that the City is invested in its businesses. Councillor Cheung stated that he makes it a priority to sponsor City Council resolutions when he becomes aware of new businesses opening in the city. Ms. Saffari commented that the CDD does make every effort to stay on top of transitioning businesses due to the move in dates of said businesses.

Mr. Smith stated that given the complexity of the issues, the City of Cambridge staff at the License Commission, the Water Department, Pubic Works, etc. do a very good job but the problem is that what each individual department needs can appear to be in conflict or there can be a duplication of information. He stated that the system needs to be simplified in order to provide excellent service.

Mr. Marquardt stated on his tax bill there is only one line that is geared to commercial taxes. He stated that more information regarding commercial taxes would be useful to homeowners and beneficial in showing the comparison to the commercial rate which is $11 lower than Boston.

Regarding suggested goal #6 (that a unique identity for each neighborhood be established and marketed), Councillor Cheung stated that the City Council recently passed the designation of Central Square as a cultural district. Mr. Carlone suggested that each area of the city participate in a survey to state what kind of retail is wanted there. He commented that such surveys may be helpful for business people seeking to navigate through the zoning hierarchy. He commented that if neighborhoods are involved and all parties are on the same page, then the zoning/permitting issues may be minimized.

Regarding suggested goal #9 (need to add additional floors and GFA/FAR to single story retail establishments in major parts of the city), Mr. Marquardt stated that in order to keep first floor boutique retail shops in business, their rents must be lower that the rents a property owner would get from renting to a bank or cell phone store, which means that there have to be additional stories of housing or commercial uses in the buildings in locations such as along Massachusetts Avenue to support the first floor boutiques. Mr. Smith stated that along streetcar corridors one would typically see ground floor retail and apartments above.

In speaking to suggested goal #10 (diversification of industries), Mr. Carlone stated that all space cannot be retail and the city needs to think how we treat that. He stated that he knows some that say form-based zoning will not happen here but it is something that should be investigated and that the principles of form-based zoning should be incorporated into our zoning. Mr. Smith stated that regulations need to allow for diversity. Councillor Cheung inquired as to how regulations would achieve that goal. Mr. Smith stated that the way that you get diversity is to make it possible for a variety of businesses to stay here. He added that when Cambridge's tax rate is 2/3 that of its largest competitor (Boston) and a business is looking to be centrally located, the field narrows between Cambridge and Boston. What fills that gap between Cambridge and Boston is that you can spend less and get more in Cambridge than Boston.

On suggested goal #11(encouragement and assistance in the development and launch of new companies), Councillor Cheung stated that we need to do more to support the clean energy community in the City. Mr. Marquardt questioned how the City could acquire a piece of such a company to let them use rooftops, etc. Councillor Cheung commented that there would be a myriad of issues for the City to have stock in private companies.

Councillor Cheung stated that the City of Cambridge promotes jobs for area residents as stated in suggested goal #12. Mr. Murphy stated that the challenge is that there are not that many Cambridge residents involved in trades. Mr. Smith stated the importance of the schools to provide students with broader scope of career paths. Mr. Murphy stated that the city is working to ensure that students and employers give kids a sense of what is out there regarding trade opportunities as well.

Regarding suggested goal #13 (better collaboration across organizations and the region), Mr. Smith stated that the Chamber of Commerce helps to facilitate business organizations and other Chambers throughout the state as a way to connect Cambridge businesses with the rest of the region as it relates to work done outside of Massachusetts.

Janneke House spoke on suggested goals #14 (ensuring that all city staff with purchasing responsibilities have full knowledge of the priorities of the City to think and buy local) and #15 (create some sort of incentive to encourage city departments to buy from local retailers, for example, a cash back program). She reiterated the importance of buying local and stressed the resources in Cambridge and the importance of using them. Ms. House stated that she was not familiar with cash back programs. Mr. Marquardt stated that it is wise to remind people to buy local due to the fact that local businesses are starting to feel the impact of purchases made via the internet. Ms. Glazer noted that the City is required to follow strict rules with regard to purchasing practices and procedures, such as requesting bids, documenting response, accepting the lowest bid, etc.

Regarding # 17 (improve the physical infrastructure in areas where big business is located) Mr. Carlone stated that if Cambridge wants to encourage businesses, it is not just removing a bush or graffiti; it is making sure lighting is adequate and attractive, that there are comfortable places to sit. People will go where it is a pleasure to shop. He commented that studies have shown if there are comfortable places to sit, sales go up 10%. He said that he wishes there were centers where people could gather.

Mr. Carlone stated that taking a cohesive district as a whole is not mentioned. All squares can be improved as special places. Some spaces are sad at the edges. Brian Murphy stated that he is looking to make goals more smart goals in general. He commented that the challenge is that it is a softer goal whereas some other goals could be more robust.

Mr. Smith stated that when the Chamber of Commerce and the Office of Tourism are contacted they encourage individuals and groups to come to Cambridge when they visit Boston. He stated that it is important to make sure it is easy to navigate the City.

Mr. Carlone said that he would like to see creative arts added to the list.

Mr. Jenkins stated that MIT had a number of vacant buildings and they have been recently successful in finding occupants for those buildings. When MIT went through a process to identify tenants, the perception was that it is easier to do business in Cambridge than Boston. That being said, it was still a difficult task with multiple steps such as permitting process, zoning issues, etc. There is no single set of rules. As a community we can tell people that we can help you, try to make it easier for you, etc. He commented that perhaps some type of ombudsman to help navigate the process would be helpful. Direction is what businesses need. Some landlords just want to get their rent and don't go that extra mile while MIT went national to fill buildings. He stated that it may behoove the City to go out, say I'm going to represent landlords, state what properties are available and give contact information for said property. If the perception is that Cambridge wants to do business, it will happen. The smaller guys need the way paved.

Mr. Smith said it would be great for someone in the CDD to be the ombudsman. A simple approach is to require fewer variances. Absent that, we need to make it easier and be able to direct interested businesses to the services provided.

Mr. Murphy stated that a great deal of Ms. Saffari's and Mr. Basler's work is helping small businesses get started and overcome hurdles. It could be beneficial to have case study sessions to gage how the process works, what was difficult, etc. The CDD is also trying to have a more customer-friendly website.

Ms. Saffari stated that the CDD has workshops to aid businesses in navigating the City and its services. She stated that the workshops will be starting up again soon. There was a request from a business owner that the workshop schedule include some earlier and later times than the last schedule.

With respect to goal # 18 (create programs to support our three business sectors: entrepreneurs, large R&D based, and local) Mr. Marquardt raised the issue of how the City can work with the Cambridge biotech community to showcase the strengths and advantages for biotech companies to locate in Cambridge. BIO 12 will take place in Boston next year. Companies like Alexandria that stand to benefit from the interest that could be generated at this mega conference may want to partner with the City to produce an outstanding display.

Councillor Cheung then asked all who were present at the meeting to choose from the list of suggested goals the five that they believed were the most important for the City to focus on for the FY 13 fiscal year. Thereafter he collected the lists and explained that his aide would tabulate the results. After the results are tabulated they will be forwarded to CDD's Economic Development Department and discussed at the next Economic Development, Training and Employment meeting on this topic.

Councillor Cheung thanked all those present for their participation. The meeting was adjourned at 4:55pm.

For the committee
Councillor Leland Cheung, Chair


AWAITING REPORT LIST
10-50. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on options for amending the ordinance to allow for permitting of civic organizations to use public space after hours.
Councillor Cheung 03/22/10 (O-18)

10-89. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on a delineation of the boundaries of Joan Lorentz Park.
Councillor Seidel, Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 05/24/10 (O-11)

10-133. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on railroad crossing safety policies and procedures, including equipment maintenance and repair in the City of Cambridge.
Councillor Seidel 09/13/10 (O-16)

10-173. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #8
RE: report on the particular facts and general principles to support affordable housing as part of the mitigation in zoning mitigation negotiations.
Councillor Decker 11/08/10 (O-12)

10-176. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #8
RE: report on the feasibility of creating a "Bonding Program" for the purpose of ensuring that a process exists to enable the completion of work on projects where a developer fails to comply with an agreed upon community mitigation agreement.
Mayor Maher and Full Membership 11/22/10 (O-3)

10-177. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on meetings with presidents of Cambridge colleges/universities to work out a proposal that they will pay the tuition and fees for students graduating from Cambridge public high schools.
Councillor Reeves and Full Membership 11/22/10 (O-7)

10-178. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on developing an RFP for experimental music venues and space in Central Square.
Councillor Reeves and Full Membership 11/22/10 (O-8)

10-180. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #8
RE: report on feasibility of developing a formula/mechanism for receiving revenues negotiated during zoning changes and the possibility such revenues generated by a formula for distribution to community based non-profits.
Mayor Maher & Councillor Simmons 11/22/10 (O-12)

10-181. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #8
RE: report on the current formula that the City uses to calculate linkage payments for large scale projects.
Mayor Maher & Councillor Simmons 11/22/10 (O-13)

10-183. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #8
RE: report on the state of the law relating to community benefits as mitigation in zoning amendment petitions.
Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Seidel, Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 12/13/10 (O-1)

10-184. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the possibility of the Cambridge Farmers Market using space for the winter months in the ground floor of the First Street garage or other suitable space.
Vice Mayor Davis, Mayor Maher, Councillor Toomey, Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 12/13/10 (O-2)

10-185. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on establishing a "pilot program" for Clean Tech Start-Ups in the first floor of vacant First Street garage.
Mayor Maher and Full Membership 12/13/10 (O-4)

10-186. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on possible options for providing more support for the homeless youth in Cambridge.
Councillor Decker and Full Membership 12/13/10 (O-5)

10-190. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of implementing the 311 system in Cambridge.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 12/20/10 (O-2)

11-03. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on possibility of allowing homeowners alternatives to alter flat roof structures to create better rain water runoff collection.
Mayor Maher, Councillor Cheung, Councillor Kelley, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel & Councillor Simmons 01/10/11 (O-5)

11-06. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on whether the Responsible Employer Ordinance was complied with in regard to the recent bid on water-proofing project in Lafayette Square.
Councillor Cheung, Councillor Decker, Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Kelley, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel, Councillor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 01/10/11 (O-9)

11-15. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on what incentives were given to Vertex as part of their relocation deal and evaluate how Cambridge could offer those same incentives to companies it is attempting to lure from out of state to the City.
Councillor Cheung, Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Kelley, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel & Councillor Simmons 01/31/11 (O-15)

11-20. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the possibility of retaining the traffic light on Memorial Drive at Magazine Street.
Councillor Kelley, Councillor Cheung, Councillor Seidel, Vice Mayor Davis, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 02/07/11 (O-3)

11-27. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on recent trip of Public Safety officials to Israel and on the City's policies regarding the provision of professional development of City officials by private entities.
Councillor Decker, Councillor Cheung, Councillor Kelley, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel & Councillor Simmons 02/28/11 (O-20)

11-28. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on possible projects that could be completed with the help of Code for America.
Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 03/07/11 (O-1)

11-49. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the current state of the Pacific Street dog park and devise a strategy to make it more accessible and enjoyable for both dog owners and their pets.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 05/02/11 (O-2)

11-53. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on how to make the Follen Street/Little Concord Avenue intersection safer for pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists. Referred back by Councillor Cheung on 5/23/2011 for further information.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 05/16/11 (O-3)

11-58. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of installing a projector presentation screen in the Sullivan Chamber.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 05/16/11 (O-12)

11-59. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on a plan to keep the sidewalk crossings accessible for the fall/winter 2011 at major pedestrian thoroughfares.
Councillor Kelley and Full Membership 05/16/11 (O-15)

11-61. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the percentage of tree canopy coverage.
Councillor Seidel and Full Membership 05/16/11 (O-22)

11-63. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on determining the impact that the Batelle Study recommendations could have on Cambridge.
Vice Mayor Davis 05/16/11 (O-24)

11-64. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the feasibility of implementing paying for city services on-line.
Councillor Cheung 05/16/11 (O-29)

11-65. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on the possibility of emulating the San Francisco Yellow Pages ban in Cambridge.
Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 05/23/11 (O-1)

11-66. Report from the City Manager:  See Mgr #30
RE: report on the feasibility of allowing a one hour off-leash window at Longfellow Park.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 05/23/11 (O-3)

11-68. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on future plans for the East Cambridge Post Office.
Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 05/23/11 (O-6)

11-69. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on working with utility companies to ensure that all pole wire transfers and removal of unsightly older poles are completed in a quick and efficient manner.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 05/23/11 (O-9)

11-71. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on total of donations raised during the 2011 resident sticker renewals for environmental initiatives, identify a project that the funds can be used for and publicly display that the funds were possible from resident donations.
Councillor Toomey, Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Councillor Kelley, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel & Councillor Simmons 06/06/11 (O-2)

11-72. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on determining if the Silver Maple Forest could be purchased for preservation.
Councillor Kelley, Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel, Councillor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 06/06/11 (O-5)

11-73. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on options for disposing of medical waste such as syringes.
Councillor Kelley, Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Decker, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel, Councillor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 06/06/11 (O-6)

11-76. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on long term strategy that mitigates the actions of the Boston cab companies.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/20/11 (O-2)

11-77. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on amending the Paine Park fountain's schedule through Labor Day.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/20/11 (O-3)

11-78. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on where the police currently conduct foot patrols or park & walks and how these locations are decided.
Councillor Toomey and Full Membership 06/20/11 (O-6)

11-79. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on installing benches in front of the Main Library.
Councillor Cheung and Full Membership 06/27/11 (O-3)

11-80. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on enforcement of biking on the sidewalks in Central Square.
Vice Mayor Davis, Councillor Cheung, Councillor Decker, Mayor Maher, Councillor Reeves, Councillor Seidel, Councillor Simmons & Councillor Toomey 06/27/11 (O-4)

11-81. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on producing information for residents and taxpayers regarding readily available financial information online for citizens to view and easily understand.
Councillor Decker and Full Membership 06/27/11 (O-6)

11-82. Report from the City Manager:
RE: report on any possible implications of the merger between the Longy School of Music and Bard College.
Councillor Seidel 06/27/11 (O-9)